Arthur S. Demoulas Hates the Boston Herald

July 31, 2014

Why else would he refuse to hire Boston Herald readers?

From today’s Boston Globe:

 

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(There’s plenty of news coverage of the latest developments in the Demoulas Slapfight/Market Basket Rumpus here.)

Crosstown at the feisty local tabloid, the only appearance of the ad was in this news report.

Market Basket is running ads today seeking directors and assistant directors for its stores, and accountants, accounts payable/receivable associates, and grocery and perishable buyers in Tewksbury and Andover. The fairs are open to employees seeking new positions and the public.

 

Market Basket is running ads (note the plural), just not in the Herald. So Market Basket does not want to hire Herald readers? That just seems wrong.

The thirsty local tabloid did, however, get a consolation prize – this ad from an alphabet-soup coalition attacking Hamas.

 

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Even that was bittersweet, though. As the hardreading staff noted, the Globe had the ad a week ago.


Hey, Forget Arthur S . . . The Boston Globe Owns Market Basket Today

July 30, 2014

As the hardreading staff noted earlier, yesterday’s Boston Herald got the better of the Globe in the Boston dailies’ coverage of the Demoulas Slapfight/Market Basket Rumpus. But today, the stately local broadsheet was on the story like Brown on Williamson, with four – count ‘em, four – pieces on the grocery-store equivalent of mutually assured destruction.

Start, of course, with Page One (the Globe ePaper is Lost in Cyberspace right now, so no screenshots for you!).

Market Basket board still ponders sale offers

Bid by ousted leader reportedly the focus

Negotiations over the fate of the embattled Market Basket grocery chain stretched into a second day Tuesday, as the company’s board said the owners were evaluating a sale to help rescue the multibillion-dollar business.

As analysts warn that the value of the company falls and the threat to workers’ jobs rises with each day of indecision, the board said it was still considering offers by ousted president Arthur T. Demoulas and other suitors. People familiar with the talks said Demoulas’s offer was the focus of discussions throughout the day.

 

And Market Basket is the focus of the Globe throughout today’s paper. Drifting back to the Business section we find Shirley Leung’s column about other grocery families that struggled with ownership, Jack Newsham’s piece on Market Basket loyalists shopping at the competition, and a look at social media by Callum Borchers and Andrew Ba Tran, complete with nifty graphic.

Social media play key role in Market Basket saga

 

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It should be no surprise that in the digital age Facebook has served as the center of the Market Basket protest movement. But just a few short weeks ago, many of the employees leading the fight barely knew their way around the Internet.

Until recently Market Basket didn’t have an official company website. It quickly crashed and is still not working. Managers have company e-mail accounts but use them sparingly. When you work in a supermarket, the colleague you need to talk to is never more than a few aisles away.

“Technology is not part of our company culture,” acknowledged Tom Gordon, who was a a grocery supervisor at market basket for 39 years before being fired in early July for helping organize the protest. “I’m still using my flip phone, if that’s any indication.

Yet a Facebook page called Save Market Basket has become the hub where workers lay out the next course of action to get their ousted president, Arthur. T. Demoulas reinstated, post news articles and letters from the company’s board of directors, and where tens of thousands of customers have pledged their support.

 

feels like there’s no bottom to this well, doesn’t it?


Margery Eagan to Boston Globe

July 30, 2014

Boston Herald columnist Margery Eagan is taking her talents crosstown to the Boston Globe’s Catholic website, according to Two-Daily Town sources.  She’ll join the vertical the Globe established for John L. Allen Jr., former correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

The feisty local tabloid will be significantly less feisty without Eagan, who’s never been shy about weighing in on all matters Cathoholic.

Check out Boston Public Radio on WGBH radio this afternoon for further details from Globe editor Brian McGrory.

And all best, Margery.

UPDATE: Here’s the Globe press release.

Margery Eagan Named Spirituality Columnist For Crux, A New Website Covering Catholicism

BOSTON (July 30, 2014) – Margery Eagan, a well-known Boston columnist and radio talk show host, will become the spirituality columnist for Crux, a website devoted to Catholicism being launched by Boston Globe Media Partners in early September.

Eagan has been a columnist at the Boston Herald since the early 1980s, interrupted by a stint as a senior writer at Boston Magazine. She will continue to co-host “Boston Public Radio,” a daily current events talk show, with Jim Braude on WGBH Radio (89.7 FM).

In her column for Crux, Eagan will explore issues of spirituality, contemplation, and devotion, drawing on her personal experience with her Catholic faith, as well as that of other Catholics and those of various religious traditions.

“Margery has had a longstanding fascination with issues around spirituality and has spent no small part of her adult life exploring deep issues involving her Catholic faith,” said Globe editor Brian McGrory. “We couldn’t be more delighted to add her smart, engaging voice to our strong roster of reporters and columnists that will be the backbone of this new site.”

Crux will be a standalone website that covers the institution of the church, with particular focus on how the words and actions of Pope Francis affect Catholics worldwide. It will delve into the practices and challenges of living a Catholic life, and publish the wide-ranging thoughts and opinions of Catholics and others. It will be found atwww.cruxnow.com. Readers can follow Crux on Twitter, @Crux, and Facebook,facebook.com/crux.

Teresa Hanafin, editor of the new site, said Eagan’s exploration of her own spirituality through retreats and extensive reading will add a valuable dimension to Crux. “There are many, many Catholics who engage in a very deep, spiritual examination of their faith and their personal relationship with God,” Hanafin said. “Margery is of that world. She understands it, she experiences it, and now she will discuss it with the readers of Crux.”

A native of Fall River, Massachusetts, Eagan received a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from Stanford University. She has written for the Fall River Herald News, the New Bedford Standard Times, the Burlington Free Press in Vermont, Boston Magazine, and the Globe. She has appeared on CNN and Fox News, and is a regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a media criticism show that is part of the “Greater Boston” public affairs show on WGBH television.

 


Boston Herald’s a Better Manager of Bottomless Market Basket Story

July 30, 2014

From our Late to the Party Poopers desk

Monday’s local dailies both featured the obligatory quotidian update on the Demoulas Slapfight/Market Basket Rumpus.

The Boston Globe’s Page One piece:

Pressure mounts on Market Basket board of directors

No decision on offer of buyout by Demoulas as chain’s losses increase

With a multibillion-dollar supermarket empire hanging in the balance, the Market Basket board of directors met Monday to again consider a buyout offer from Arthur T. Demoulas but agreed only to continue negotiating, according to a person briefed on the discussions.

Demoulas had previously set the end of Monday as the deadline for rival members of his family to respond to his offer to buy their half of the company. The board’s continued negotiations will keep Demoulas’s bid on the table for now, according to the person familiar with the discussions, but both sides are facing pressure to resolve the family feud that has paralyzed the 71-store chain and caused tens of millions of dollars in losses.

 

Among those pressures: a total revolt by Market Basket store managers.

Are-they-nuts graf:

Meanwhile, managers of some stores signed a petition stating that they would resign unless Arthur T. Demoulas is reinstated as president of Market Basket or if the company is sold to an outside buyer. It was unclear how many managers had signed the petition Monday night.

 

Excuse us – it was not unclear to the Boston Herald.

It’s ‘Artie T’ or they’re bagging it

Market Basket managers to quit unless CEO reinstated

Market Basket managers have reaffirmed their commitment to working for nobody else but fired CEO Arthur T. Demoulas, saying they’ll quit if he isn’t reinstated — a threat that could remove the working management of most of the chain’s stores, already reeling from a loss of customers and protests by thousands of workers.

Managers and assistant managers from 68 of the Tewksbury chain’s 71 stores had signed a petition by yesterday evening stating they would resign immediately if Demoulas isn’t reinstated “with full authority” or another buyer other than Demoulas purchases the company, according to Steve Paulenka, a former Market Basket facilities and operations supervisor who was fired July 20 for helping spearhead employee protests and job walk-offs.

 

So who’s doing a better job of bagging this story?

Quotidian update later today.


John Henry Uses Herald to Whack Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy

July 27, 2014

The Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman got an email interview with Boston GlobeSox owner John Henry, which, of course, was Page One news for the feisty local tabloid.

 

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The email exchange between Silverman and Henry was pretty much what you’d expect.

Henry takes stock of perplexing Sox

The Red Sox are genuinely perplexed.

Barely more than two weeks ago, principal owner John Henry was told by his general manager that the Red Sox “are probably the IN4Z7200.JPGbest team in the division. We just aren’t playing like it.”

The reasons behind the team’s incredibly underwhelming and disappointing caliber of play for most of the first four months of the season are not clear to Henry and the front office. With the trade deadline looming Thursday, Henry and his baseball operations people have been trying to get a better handle on what’s gone wrong and discover if there’s time left to fix it.

 

It’s not exactly riveting stuff – when Silverman asks if the Sox are sellers or buyers, Henry replies, “We’ll see what happens (this) week.”

Ya think?

But there is one juicy item in the piece: A not-so-veiled reference to this from Boston Globe scribe (and Henry employee) Dan Shaughnessy last Sunday (reproduced in full for, well, full effect).

When did Boston go so soft on the Red Sox?

At this hour, your Boston Red Sox enjoy a friendlier environment than almost any of the 30 teams in baseball. The Sox have a chance to finish in last place for the second time in three years, win a playoff game in only one of six seasons, and still be perceived by their fans as “perennial contenders.’’ The Sox can play nine games under .500 for the first 95 games and still have a Nation of believers thinking they can win the division, or compete for the phony second wild card. Sox owners can pare payroll ($72.5 million scheduled to come off the books for next year), stay well below the coveted luxury tax threshold, and listen to regional applause while fans pay the highest ticket prices in baseball. The Sox can get folks to buy into the notion that it’s foolish to compete in the open market for the services of their best pitcher. Sox tickets and merchandise are hotter than they were at this time last summer and Pat Moscaritolo, president of a Boston tourist group, says, “For the past 10 years that I’ve been tracking visitor spending and the economic impact of the Red Sox, it’s almost unaffected by the team’s performance.’’

The Sox were positively surging with five wins in six games against terrible/mediocre teams (aggregate 21 games under .500) as they prepped for the Royals Saturday night. The KC-Boston matchup is a good one, since it sometimes sounds like the Sox want to be a middle-market team. Like the Royals of recent decades (29 years since making the playoffs), the Sox now sell the fans on “watching the kids.” Don’t people realize that EVERY team has a farm system stocked with young players who’d love to play in front of sellout crowds in the moribund final months of a season? It amazes me how soft this baseball market has become. In 1978 fans and media crushed the Sox for a 99-win season that concluded with eight consecutive pressure-packed victories. The Boston manager was unmercifully booed on Opening Day the following year. Now everything is awesome because the Boston ballpark is a tourist destination and fans fall in love with the hype of every young player coming through the system. Swell. When did we become St. Louis?

 

Ouch. The only thing Shaughnessy left out? That the principal owner of the GlobeSox etc. etc.

Regardless, how much fun is it that Henry employed his own crosstown rival to dope-slap his wayward minion, saying this:

 “Fans continue to sell out Fenway. They’ve suffered through some really bad games this year, but they continue to show up and the mood at the park among the fans is very positive when I walk through the stands. Before Tom [Werner], Larry [Lucchino] and I arrived I believe fans had less patience.

“A loud curmudgeon I know accuses them of being soft, bad fans — but anyone paying attention knows the mood has changed at Fenway over the years. People expect good things from the Sox and really love being at Fenway. This team accomplished something very special last year therefore the fans aren’t about to not give them the benefit of the doubt.”

 

Love that double negative. Wonder what Mr. Shaughnessy thinks.


Who Cracked Hack Attack?

July 25, 2014

Now that former probation commissioner John J. O’Brien has gone down like the Hindenburg, the local dailies have  begun patting themselves on the back in earnest.

Today’s Boston Globe Page One:

The federal prosecution was based in large part on a 2010 Boston Globe Spotlight series that exposed widespread patronage hiring in the Probation Department, which oversees defendants facing charges in a criminal court and mediates disputes in family courts.

 

Crosstown, however, the Boston Herald remembers it a bit differently, giving the Globe series third billing:

 

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That’s some serious glory-grabbing by the heisty local tabloid, eh?

Hey, Globeniks: Rebuttal?


The NABJ Is Coming! The NABJ Is Coming!

July 24, 2014

Once again, ad-vantage, Boston Globe. From today’s Sports section comes this ad for the 39th Annual Convention and Career Fair of the National Association of Black Journalists (in two parts for legibility).

 

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Looks great. Except . . . George Washington? Really? Or is it just me?

Anyway, crosstown rival Boston Herald once again got adnored. On the other hand, the feisty local tabloid does have a monopoly on the slapfight between Casey (“A Rose for Mary”) Sherman and Brighton private detective John DiNatale over the Boston Strangler case. (Nutshell: Sherman got it wrong about who killed his aunt; DiNatale got his father Phil’s files from the investigation; Track Gal Gayle Fee’s got it all here.)

That’s all for today.


Boston Globe Ad-vantage: Hillary and Hamas

July 23, 2014

From our Ad Hoc desk

Interesting confluence of ads in the Boston Globe today.

On page A6:

 

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And before you say, “Really, Hillary? Sam’s Club? Seekonk?” you should remember that Walmart/Sam’s Club sells a helluva lot of books every year.

Plus, it seems fitting that Madame Former Secretary should share an edition of the Globe with this ad (back page of the A section):

 

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Drive-‘em-nuts graf:

 

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You’ll find the website for the alphabet-soup coalition here. The hardwatching staff will be interested to see if there’s a pro-Palestinian/anti-Israeli rejoinder in the stately local broadsheet tomorrow.

Meanwhile, crosstown at the Herald, ads (but not the two above) occupy roughly three of today’s first 30 pages. That’s hardly enough scratch to pay the Boston Herald Radio gerbils.

(To be sure graf comes next.)

To be sure, it’s mid-week mid-summer, but, man, they gotta be feeling some ad nauseum at the the thirsty local tabloid.


Wynn-Lose Casino Bid in Boston Dailies

July 20, 2014

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

In Boston’s ongoing Casino Roulette, the latest Wynn Resorts offer got very different reactions in the local dailies.

Boston Globe:

Wynn makes offer to Boston

Proposal is richest to a city near planned Everett casino

Wynn Resorts has offered the City of Boston $1 million upfront and $2.6 million annually, along with hiring preferences for city bbcfcc7493b24cd4be382d27cbf275be-bbcfcc7493b24cd4be382d27cbf275be-0residents, as compensation to offset the possible effects of a planned hotel and gambling resort on the Mystic River waterfront in Everett.

It is the richest deal Wynn offered to any community around the company’s planned resort, but far less than the $18 million annual payment promised to Boston by a rival applicant, Mohegan Sun, which is proposing a Revere casino.

 

Right – far less, as the Boston Herald headlined:

Wynn offer pales beside Sun’s

Rejected Everett deal a fifth of Mohegan’s

The best-and-final offer Wynn Resorts made to Boston — but Mayor Martin J. Walsh rejected — to soften the impact of the casino it IMG_8716.JPGwants to build in Everett called for $6 million in one-time payments and $2.6 million annually, according to a copy of the deal obtained by the Herald.

The cash pales in comparison to the $30 million upfront and minimum annual $18 million pledged to Boston by rival Mohegan Sun for a gaming resort on the Revere side of Suffolk Downs.

 

That’s the local dailies in a nutshell: Sunny-side-up Globe, sunny-side-down Herald.

Eggs-actly.


Demoulas Ad Fits Boston Globe to a (Arthur) T

July 20, 2014

The endless Demoulas Family/Market Basket rumpus will no doubt have its own A&E reality program (Grocery!) eventually, but for now it’s playing out mostly in the local dailies.

Saturday’s installment featured this Page One piece in the Boston Globe.

Workers stand up for ousted Demoulas

Thousands skip Market Basket to back ex-chief

TEWKSBURY — They left their jobs as butchers and baggers, cashiers and clerks, and came from Rochester, N.H., Fitchburg, Raynham, and Milford for a noisy show of worker solidarity against company bosses they distrust.rally5

In an unusual sign of unity and devotion, more than 2,000 supporters of ousted Demoulas Market Basket chief executive Arthur T. Demoulas gathered outside the chain’s headquarters Friday to demand his return to the top of the family supermarket empire.

They carried colorful signs and cheered speeches against corporate greed, all the while risking being fired for skipping work to attend the protest.

“We do this every day until he comes back,” Tom Trainor, a longtime Market Basket supervisor, said of the employee protests on behalf of Demoulas, who was fired in late June by a board controlled by his chief rival and cousin, Arthur S. Demoulas.

 

And there might be more axing to come judging by this full-page ad in yesterday’s Globe:

 

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Nut grafs:

 

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Doesn’t sound very hopeful for the rankish file, eh?

But, wait!

Here’s the Boston Herald’s take:

Market Basket workers escape ax

Rally

There had yet to be fallout last night for Market Basket employees who ditched work yesterday to rally for the reinstatement of the grocery chain’s fired CEO even as their own jobs were on the line.

An estimated 2,500 to 3,000 Market Basket employees and others showed up at the company’s Tewksbury headquarters yesterday to show support for former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas, fired last month by a board aligned with his rival cousin and shareholder, Arthur S. Demoulas.

 

The above appeared on page 13, which likely has nothing to do with the unfortunate (for the Herald) fact that the Market Basket ad did not run in the feisty local tabloid.

But hope springs eternal for the Sunday Boston Herald, yeah?


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