Dailies Double: Boston Papers Hit the Mittfecta

January 14, 2015

Today’s local dailies feature very special Op-Ed ValPaks – columnist + editorial cartoonist – focused on the Last Temptation of Mitt.

Start with the Boston Globe’s Scot Lehigh, who provides this summary of Mitt Romney’s Sisyphean presidential history:

Romney has run twice now, and has twice failed to demonstrate convincing campaign competence or a genuine ability to connect. And though an occasional gaffe is inevitable in a long campaign, Romney spent an astonishing amount of time munching on his own shoe leather. Further, even in the GOP’s strange 2012 callithumpian parade of candidates, he had trouble closing the deal . . .

Even by political standards, Mitt’s malleability has left him looking opportunistic and inauthentic. And for good reason: He is.

 

Ouch.

Lehigh’s conclusion: “For Romney, this looks less like the road to redemption than the path to palookaville.”

Double ouch.

The Globe’s Dan Wasserman is slightly more graphic.

 

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Coincidentally, the Boston Herald’s Jerry Holbert also goes the superhero route.

 

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Uh-huh. On the facing page, though, syndicated columnist Jonah Goldberg isn’t so sure.

You know how superhero flicks often have an extra scene after the credits to hint at what the sequel will be like? Well, this would be the perfect end to the movie “Romney 2012.”

The problem is that “Romney for president” is now an art house film thinking it’s a blockbuster franchise and that there’s a huge market for another sequel. There’s not.

 

So third time’s not the charm? Goldberg’s conclusion: “[T]he idea that a one-term Massachusetts governor, who hired Jonathan Gruber to help design his health-care plan, is just what the Republicans need to run against Hillary Clinton is odd, particularly when the GOP has a much more talented, and fresher, field than it did in 2012.”

In other words, don’t bet the Mittfecta.


Comic Strips Not ‘Living’ Large in Boston Globe

January 12, 2015

Well the new Living section (which replaces the late, unlamented G section) debuted in the Boston Globe today, and here’s how the paper’s press release touted the launch:

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The Boston Globe Launches New Living/Arts Section with Daily Themes and Fresh Content

Monday through Saturday section to feature everything from food to technology to parenting tips; debuts January 12

Boston (January 12, 2015) – The Boston Globe launched today the new Living/Arts section – a daily broadsheet section focusing on arts, culture, entertainment, and lifestyle. Previously the “g” section, Living/Arts is now bigger and bolder with a fresh design and collection of new compelling features and columns.

The Living/Arts section will include the Globe’s award-winning coverage of arts and culture, as well as family, events, books, style, restaurants, and nightlife, among other new features, in an engaging and eye-catching package.

The new section will revolve around daily themes, Monday through Saturday . . .

 

And etc.

There’s no mention in the press release of the comics pages, mainly because they’ve moved to the back of the Metro section. And, to all appearances, they’ve moved down in size as well.

G:

 

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Metro:

 

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It’s hard to tell from the Globe’s ePaper edition, but here’s an individual matchup.

G Zippy:

 

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Metro Zippy:

 

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The hardreading staff recycles so religiously, we don’t have an old G section lying around the Global Worldwide Headquarters for a paper comparison, but we’re searching elsewhere in hopes of putting an old-fashioned ruler to the strips.

Meanwhile, if any of you splendid readers can enlighten us further, please do.


Hark! The Herald! (Whole in Their Head Edition)

January 12, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid seems determined to run a Whole Foods/Herald story as often as possible.

It started with this piece last Wednesday.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

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In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

(Boston Magazine’s Eric Randall immediately had a smart piece chronicling the Herald’s “screeds against the half of the country that columnist Howie Carr sometimes collectively refers to as ‘Whole Foods nation'” along with a roll call of the Herald’s Whole lotta love.)

Then Saturday’s Herald featured this update from Donna Goodison:

It’s a Whole new story at 
old Herald site

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Whole Foods Market debuted its newest Boston store in the South End Friday — its second largest in the region and considered a flagship for its North Atlantic division — and co-CEO Walter Robb sees room in the Hub for another of its size.

“We’ve seen the city evolving, so we have lots of plans,” the Boston native said. “The opportunity to come in here and get 50,000 square feet — that’s hard to do these days, and I do think there’s another one (in the future pipeline).” . . .

Its South End supermarket is in National Development’s $200 million Ink Block project, the former Boston Herald headquarters site for more than half a century, and it memorializes the newspaper’s history throughout its decor.

 

Of course it does.

Then yesterday, there was this thoroughly readable piece from Peter Gelzinis:

From press to produce

The legendary author Thomas Wolfe was misinformed when he wrote “You Can’t Go Home Again.”117A1228.JPG

I’m here to say you can. But when you do, you’ll discover home has been transformed into the biggest Whole Foods store in Boston.

 

It’s a sweet trip down Memory Lane with Bert McNeil and Mike Bello, Danny and Dennis Messing, and especially Gelzinis himself.

But there’s also a subtext to all that Wholesomeness: “Herald publisher Patrick J. Purcell [is] a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.”

So – a Whole lotta money involved.

And today?

Wholly absent.

But we don’t expect that to last long.


Empathy Gap in Boston Dailies’ Colleen Ritzer Coverage?

January 11, 2015

From our Late to the Party of the First Part desk

The savage 2013 murder of Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer has finally wended its way into court, and yesterday’s local dailies presented very different pictures of the initial legal proceedings and their effects on Colleen’s mother, Peggie Ritzer.

Jessica Heslam’s column in the Boston Herald:

Voice connects moms in teacher tragedy

Peggie Ritzer’s face creased with anguish as the recorded voice of another mother on the other side of the 010915chism008courtroom — the mom of the teenager charged with raping and killing Ritzer’s beloved daughter Colleen — brought her to tears . . .

Diana Chism was at the Danvers police station. Her son Philip had been found, the cops told her, but he was under arrest and they believed he had hurt somebody — a teacher.

“Oh my God, please don’t tell me somebody’s dead. Oh my God, I’m going to pass out,” Diana said on the dramatic recording, played in Salem Superior Court yesterday at a hearing to determine whether the teen’s statements to police will be tossed out.

Peggie Ritzer shed many tears yesterday, often cupping her face in her hands . . .

 

From the Boston Globe piece:

Ritzer’s parents, Peggie and Tom, were also there. When details of her daughter’s death emerged, Peggie Ritzer sometimes wept or hunched over and hung her head low.

 

Not judging. Just noting.


Boston Globe Is ‘Living’ Large

January 9, 2015

As you splendid readers no doubt know by now, our stately local broadsheet is dumping its (tabloid-size!) G section (tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy’s Media Nation), to be replaced by a New! Improved! Living/Arts! section.

In other words, it’s all over but the touting.

From yesterday’s Globe:

 

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Family – Stories – Food – Scene – Weekend – Life. Anything they left out?

Don’t say readers.


Boston Dailies Are #NotAfraid

January 8, 2015

As the hardreading staff has noted on numerous occasions, Boston is lucky to be not just a Two-Daily Town, but a Two-Cartoonist Town as well.

The Boston Herald starts with this front page:

 

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Inside, Jerry Holbert has this to offer:

 

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Crosstown, the Boston Globe’s Dan Wasserman gets a big chunk of the editorial page:

 

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Cartoonist Ted Rall points this out at The Nib:

More full-time staff political cartoonists were killed in Paris yesterday than are employed at newspapers in the states of California, Texas and New York combined.

More full-time staff cartoonists were killed in Paris yesterday than work at all American magazines and websites combined.

 

Count your blessings, Boston. In more ways than one.


Hark! The Herald! (Whole Foods Edition)

January 7, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid has a good one in today’s edition.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

_17A1132.JPG

In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

Whole Foods spokeswoman Heather McCready told the Herald’s Donna Goodison, “We really held on to a lot of the Herald. We were happy to take it, frame it and keep it as a time capsule for our store.”

Sweet.

And a sweet deal for Herald publisher Pat Purcell, “a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.” Not to mention (and the Herald piece doesn’t) that the land itself belonged – belongs? – to Purcell.

That’s a lot of frangipane tarts, yeah?

 


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