Herald Immigration Coverage Borders on Obsessive

July 15, 2014

In its perpetual effort to play to the cheap seats, the Boston Herald has been on the current immigration rumpus like Brown on Williamson. Start with Sunday’s Page One:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 2.40.14 PM

 

That day’s tally: One news report, two local columns, one national column.

Yesterday, it was one news report, one local column, one national column, one editorial cartoon.

Today it’s full-tilt boogie: Two news reports (one of them dragging the Massachusetts gubernatorial candidates into the mix), two local columns, one national column, one editorial. (You can get the overall flavor of the Herald’s coverage here.)

As a special bonus, the frisky local tabloid posted this piece on its website earlier today:

Scott Brown slams secret immigrant flights

{object}

U.S. Senate candidate Scott Brown called the ongoing immigration crisis at the southern border “a disaster” during an interview today on Boston Herald Radio and blasted federal officials for not coming clean about secret flights of illegals landing in the Bay State.

“The fact that this is being done without people’s knowledge, it’s kind of behind the scenes, is really not appropriate. It needs to be above board, everyone needs to know what’s going on and where we’re going with this whole disaster,” he said. “It is affecting our national security, it is affecting our economic security and to think that we don’t have a secure border and we’re providing these incentives for people to come here illegally is just wrong.”

 

A number of people feel the same way about letting Brown cross the Massachusetts border.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, the immigration coverage has been more, well, low-key.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 2.33.02 PM

 

(Not to get technical about it, but the Pope piece seems to be web-only.)

One town, two different worlds, yeah?


For Third Time, Chicago Lawyer Uses Amy Lord’s Murder to His Ad-vantage

July 15, 2014

Joseph Zingher’s back in town.

As the hardreading staff has dutifully noted, the Chicago lawyer has run ads twice in the local dailies pushing for disclosure of ATM crime statistics. In both cases Mr. Zingher invoked the name of Amy Lord, the 24-year-old South Boston woman brutally murdered last year. Mr.  Zingher essentially blames local politicians for her death, since they refuse to collect and publicize the ATM crime data that could force banks to change their policies.

Specifically, Zingher would like to see banks introduce ATM duress codes. Not coincidentally, Zinger holds a patent for one such code – a reverse PIN (U.S. Patent 5,731,575). For the record, he addressed that issue in an earlier post:

Mr. Zingher claims his interest is not financial, since his patent is close to expiring. “The idea I’m going to make any money off this is ridiculous,” he told us in April. He also said he hopes to “trigger a class action suit” because suppressing ATM crime information has been part of the banking industry’s business model for 30 years.

 

Regardless, Mr. Zingher has upped the ante with his latest ad, which ran in today’s Boston Herald.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 1.02.08 PM

 

Not sure what the “corporations are people” dog whistle is doing there, but Mr. Zingher zings a passel of local pols in his ad. Call the roll:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 1.37.46 PM

 

The most prominent name, though, is Amy Lord’s. The hardreading staff would never infringe on the Lord family’s privacy, but we’d sure like to know how they feel about Mr. Zingher’s ads. His protestation aside, they give us the creeps.


Ads ‘n’ Ends from the Boston Globe

July 15, 2014

Herewith, some advertisements from the Boston Globe which the hardreading staff meant to spotlight, but never got around to.

From last Friday’s edition, an ad about the electric lines proposed for New Hampshire’s White Mountains that we knew nothing about.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 11.57.12 PM

 

Some background, if you care. Us, we don’t really go to New Hampshire.

But we do care about Boston’s homeless population, so we were glad to see this in Saturday’s Globe:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 12.11.46 AM

 

Check them out here.

Finally – literally – there was also this ad in Saturday’s Globe:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 12.14.44 AM

 

Funeral and Memorial Information Council? We knew?

Obviously, talk among yourselves.


What Can Brown Do for the Herald?

July 14, 2014

Well, for starters, give them an exclusive on his daughter’s big day – and dress. In return, Scott Brown (R-Elsewhere) got this:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 12.28.42 PM

 

And this:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 12.29.17 PM

 

Not only is it a touching story (“The first time Huff saw her daughter in her wedding dress, she wept, she said.”), it’s also exclusive to the flouncy local tabloid. The Boston Globe got bubkes, as a search of the stately local broadsheet indicates.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 12.11.41 PM

 

As you can see, the Globe hasn’t been on Arianna Patrol since that July 10 piece headlined “Kelly Ayotte to officiate at wedding of Scott Brown’s daughter.”

And so she did. You just wouldn’t know it from the Globe.


Herald “Undercover” Cab Report Is Underwhelming

July 10, 2014

For two days now the Boston Herald has featured a series called No Fare, which examines the Boston cab industry and holds a bakeoff between the Uber mobile-app car service and traditional taxis. (Sounds like the little brother of last year’s Boston Globe taxidermy of the industry? Let’s not get technical with the filchy local tabloid, eh?)

But the hardreading staff would take issue with today’s front page.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 11.20.55 AM

 

Yeah, that WE GO UNDERCOVER is a bit of an overstatement: The taxis vs. Uber ratings involved Herald reporter Erin Smith’s taking “more than a dozen test trips . . . between Logan International Airport and Kenmore Square, as well as other destinations, over the past week.”

And here’s the result:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 11.24.41 AM

 

Don’t get us wrong – that’s good work, and Smith is hardly responsible for the hyperventilating headlines the Herald editors hatch.

But undercover? C’mon. The Globe had a reporter actually drive a cab in its expose, and better yet, he got into an accident like a real cabdriver.

That’s the Boston way.


After Cab Expose, Boston Globe Has a Hohler Nother Problem

July 5, 2014

The Boston Globe’s taxidermy of the local cab industry last year has left some tire tracks on the stately local broadsheet. From the start, as the hardreading staff dutifully chronicled, crosstown rival Boston Herald has been on the Globe’s Driven to the Edge series like Brown on Williamson, especially since Globe reporter Bob Hohler got into an accident while posing as a cab driver. (Globe editor Brian McGrory insisted at the time that “[Hohler] was not masquerading as a cab driver, he was a cab driver.” And a reporter. Potato-potahto. Yesterday, the frisky local tabloid reported that the whole thing has gone to lawyers.

Pair sue reporter in cab crash

A Boston Globe reporter who went undercover as a cab driver for a series of reports on the city’s taxi industry is being sued by two of his passengers, who are claiming more than $12,000 in medical expenses after a late-night crash in November 2012. Passengers Daniel Kim and Jiwoon Choi of Boston both endured “serious personal injuries, great pain and suffering, mental anguish, lost wages and/or diminished earning capacity” after their cab, driven by Globe reporter Bob Hohler, was struck by another car at the intersection of Stuart and Clarendon streets. The suit claims Hohler failed to “exercise due care” in driving the cab. Choi claimed she suffered a fractured left orbital bone, as well as neck, head and back injuries, racking up medical bills of $9,248. Kim injured his right knee, head and left hand with medical bills of $3,600, according to the suit filed in Boston Municipal Court.

 

The harddoubting staff doesn’t expect the Globe will report the suit in today’s edition, but we’ll keep you posted.

P.S. It didn’t.


Both Boston Dailies on Drugs Today!

July 2, 2014

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

It’s Oxy Day in the local dailies, with both papers front-paging a new Centers for Disease Control report on prescription pain killers.

Ear on the Boston Herald’s front page:

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-02 at 3.14.54 PM

 

Story inside:

Critics: Docs part of opiate crisis

Graphic template

Bay State physicians rank in the top 10 nationally in prescribing OxyContin and other opiates, according to a shocking new federal report that experts say should be a wake-up call for local docs writing scripts for highly addictive drugs hand over fist.

“Those type of prescribers need to get the message: This is a deadly drug. These are highly addictive and there’s an over-prescribing of them,” said John McGahan, president of the South Boston-based Gavin Foundation, which provides education, prevention and addiction treatment.

“We’re not having people coming in saying, ‘I’m a heroin addict and I didn’t use prescription opiates first.’ It would be a rare bird,” McGahan said.

 

The piece goes on to note that “Massachusetts ranks eighth nationally and third in New England — behind Maine and New Hampshire — in the prescribing of so-called ‘extended-release’ painkillers.” It also points to a recent Herald report that “[showed] oxycodone prescriptions have spiked by roughly 27 percent over the last three years in Massachusetts . . . Oxycodone prescriptions for children have also increased by 34 percent across more than 25 pediatric specialties during the same three-year span.”

Yikes, eh?

But crosstown at the Boston Globe, the front-page story is slightly less, well, yikes.

State ranks low in prescribing of opioids

Long-acting pills an exception

Massachusetts physicians rank among the top 10 nationally in prescribing OxyContin and other long-acting painkillers, according to a government report released Tuesday that highlighted wide state-by-state variation in the rates of use of addictive opioid medications.

But the state ranked low, 41st nationally, for overall prescribing of opioids, which have become a major concern because of rising rates of abuse and overdose deaths. Long-acting pain medications such as OxyContin are only one of several types of opioids, which also include methadone, codeine, and hydrocodone.

Addiction specialists said the Massachusetts figures were encouraging.

 

We guess they just didn’t say it to the Boston Herald.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,255 other followers