Boston Herald: Suffolk U Schooled in Regan-onomics

February 11, 2016

After Suffolk University tore the sheets with local PR poobah George (Orange You Glad to See Me?) Regan, you just knew he would not go gentle into that “good night.”

Exhibit A: Joe Battenfeld’s column in today’s Boston Herald.

More PR Woes for Suffolk

Regan firm mulls fight over termination

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A powerful public relations firm fired by Suffolk University President Margaret McKenna claims it has a contract with the school and may fight the decision, triggering another potentially nasty public war.

Suffolk fired Regan Communications on Tuesday in a curt, unsigned memorandum, saying the school “no longer requires the ongoing services” of the well-known PR firm headed by longtime Boston power broker George Regan, according to a copy of the memo obtained by the Herald.

The memorandum, from “Suffolk University” but not signed by McKenna or the school’s board of trustees, came with a check for $31,623.90 for services through Feb. 9.

 

That, presumably, is on top of the roughly $300,000 the PR firm made from Suffolk in the past year.

Our favorite part: The pillow fight between Suffolk spokesman Greg Gatlin, who says Regan’s contract expired a year and a half ago, and Regan spokesman Scott MacKenzie, who says Regan Communications has a contract with Suffolk through the end of this year.  MacKenzie added, “Greg Gatlin forgets a lot of things like where he got his start in public relations” – namely, Regan Communications.

Meow.

Postscript

Once again, the Herald is out front on the Suffolk rumpus. From today’s piece:

Suffolk’s board of trustees, which had been planning to oust McKenna and replace her with former Attorney General Martha Coakley until the Herald reported on the power struggle, plans to meet tomorrow; Regan’s firing is expected to be discussed.

 

The firsty local tabloid had the original story January 28. The Boston Globe had it January 29.

Check the lately local broadsheet tomorrow for further developments.


Boston Globe Also Fails to Deliver on Refunds

February 8, 2016

When the Boston Globe’s home delivery went Chernobyl last month, the lately local broadsheet promised a credit to stiffed subscribers for the papers they failed to receive.

Turns out the Globe’s definition of credit doesn’t involve actual money. Here’s management’s latest email.

Dear Subscriber,

Many of you have contacted us recently regarding credits for missed deliveries.

Missed deliveries are credited to your account by extending your “paid through” date for the appropriate number of days. To view a detailed list of your credits by date, log in to BostonGlobe.com/MyGlobe and click on Delivery Credits in the Billing section.

We apologize for any inconvenience you may have experienced, or may still be experiencing, as a result of our delivery transition. We deeply appreciate your patience, and your loyalty to the Globe.

The Boston Globe Team

 

So instead of getting your money back, you get more papers that might or might not be delivered. Which, in turn, would extend your subscription even further.

Paging Mr. Kafka . . . paging Mr. Franz Kafka . . . 


Alumni Group Says ‘Suffolk U!’ to Board Chair (II)

February 5, 2016

The weeks-long rumpus over Suffolk University president Margaret McKenna’s administration of the school came to a head – and a headline – today, as board chairman Andrew Meyer prepared to step aside while McKenna keeps her job.

Boston Herald’s Joe Battenfeld:

Sources say Suffolk University president Margaret McKenna to keep her job

In a stunning defeat for Boston’s power brokers, 
Suffolk University trustees are abandoning a plan to fire President Margaret 
McKenna while the board chairman steps aside in a truce to end a nasty week-long war that caused major damage to the Beacon Hill institution.

McKenna may have saved her job, but her troubles are far from over. The school still has major financial and enrollment problems and it’s not clear she has the savvy and leadership skills to lead it out of its mess.

 

That move, however, didn’t keep Alumni for the Integrity of Suffolk University from running this ad in today’s Boston Globe.

 

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Check that Twitter hashtag in the ad and you get this:

 

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Nice touch: The Suffolk ad lower right.

A press release listed these folks as the major players in the alumni group:

Jared Cain, class of 2008 & former Student Government President

Dennis Harkins, Class of 2015, Former Trustee Ambassador and Student Government Secretary

Geraldin Batista, Class of 2014, former Student Government Secretary & President of the Black Student Union

Megan Caron, Class of 2012, former Student Government President

 

And here’s their Letter to the Editor.

Pretty impressive alums, eh? Suffolk must be doing something right.

UPDATE: Splendid commenter Jeff sends along this postscript:

Geeze John, I’m surprised you omitted the juicy demand from the alumni group that all trustees with affiliations to Regan Communications Group step down and that – “for the sake of the institution’s integrity, that all business associations and trustee relationships with Regan Communications Group be investigated by a third party, in an effort to rectify any existent impropriety.” Talk about in your face!

 


Boston Dailies Split on Freedom-Seeking Killers

February 4, 2016

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

How odd is this?

Wednesday’s Boston dailies separately – or is that respectively? – featured two heinous murderers seeking redemption for the umpteenth time.

The Boston Globe front-paged one of them.

More pain as killer again bids for parole

NATICK — Every five years, in a hushed parole board hearing with the family he traumatized and tore apart, Richard turner020216METRO03parole17Seymour apologizes to his ex-wife and daughter, and to the memory of the teenage son he beat to death in a drug-fueled rage.

And each time, his family remains unmoved, refusing to forgive him for a brutal crime that has already kept him behind bars for three decades.

On Tuesday, Seymour’s family renewed the painful ritual of arguing against his release, telling the state’s parole board they are haunted by the thought of Seymour being set free. Their grief over Patrick Seymour’s death, they said, has never left them.

 

You can read the gruesome details, but the bottom line is this:

The decision of the board is not expected for several months. According to the most recent study by the state’s Executive Office of Public Safety, about one-quarter of parole requests are granted for inmates serving life sentences.

This year, Patrick Seymour would have turned 48.

 

And this year Jeffrey Curley would have turned 29. But Charles Jaynes and Salvatore Sicari brutally murdered him in 1997. And now Jaynes, like Seymour, is looking to wiggle free of his punishment.

From Wednesday’s Boston Herald:

Child killer Jaynes seeking new trial

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Charles Jaynes, the self-styled Wiccan serving life for the 1997 kidnapping and murder of 10-year-old Jeffrey Curley of Cambridge, is 
imploring a panel of federal appellate justices to either grant him a new state trial or set him free, arguing the public was wrongfully barred from his first one — and that he was the victim of lousy lawyering.

A three-justice panel that includes retired U.S. 
Supreme Court Justice David Souter took Jaynes’ appeal under advisement yesterday as Jeffrey’s father Robert Curley endured yet another court hearing, 19 years after his son was kidnapped and killed by Jaynes and Salvatore Sicari, his body dumped in a river in Maine.

 

It’s heartbreaking what these families have to endure in the wake of their unimaginable tragedies.

It’s also the American justice system.

Your objections go here.


Boston Herald Is the Local Line King in Sports

January 31, 2016

Ever since the Boston Globe dumped the Tank McNamara comic strip from its Scoreboard page last year (a move the hardreading staff roundly denounced), the hately local broadsheet has been shrinking its agate-type offerings at an alarming rate.

Exhibit Umpteen: Saturday’s edition of the Globe, specifically the top of the Scoreboard page.

 

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Look at all those college basketball games. Then look at the anemic Latest line.

That’s just sad.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, meanwhile, there was this:

 

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And that’s just the half of it. Literally.

Today’s editions bring more of the same. Globe Sports:

 

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Herald Sports:

 

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Hey, Globeniks: Get your sports guys in line, eh?


Boston Globe Editorial That Looks Like Advertising

January 29, 2016

First in what we think might be a long-running series

Did the Boston Globe just reprint a Delaware North/Boston Properties press release?

From yesterday’s mately local broadsheet:

 

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Close-up of the un-bylined piece:

 

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Text from the “Globe Staff”:

Boston Properties and Delaware North Wednesday officially launched construction of a massive new complex on Causeway Street in front of TD Garden and North Station. Dubbed, “The Hub on Causeway,” the first phase of the complex underway will include a new grocery store from Star Market, a 15-screen movie theater from ArcLight Cinema, office space, and underground parking.

The first phase is to open in late 2018.

Additional phases would bring a 38-story residential tower, and two shorter towers for offices and a hotel.

The developers are also building a new entrance to North Station as well as an underground connection between the train and subway stations.

 

Sure sounds like a press release to us.

That reminded the hardstashing staff of a post we uncharacteristically held off publishing several weeks ago:

When its home delivery isn’t going Chernobyl, the Boston Globe has been all about advertising partnerships lately. So you’ll excuse us if we wonder about this piece in [the January 3rd] Address section of the $tately local broadsheet.

 

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Up close:

 

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The hardcounting staff tallies the plugs (and potential advertisers) thusly:

Heidi Pribell/Pribell Interiors: 5

Medusa Studio: 1

Visual Comfort: 1

Osborne and Little: 1

Oly: 1

Global Views: 1

Bernhardt: 1

Ballard Designs: 1

 

Maybe nothing will come of this. Maybe something will. We’ll keep an eye out.

[Full disclosure: In truth, we’ve been less than vigilant in tracking the potential advertisers above. We’ll try to do better in the future.]

But Delaware North/Boston Properties?

That’s a done deal.


Northern Avenue Bridge: Fix It or Nix It?

January 28, 2016

From our Late to the Bridge Party desk

The headscratching staff freely admits we’re confused: Is Boston’s venerable Northern Avenue Bridge slated for a $100 million fix or a $100 million replacement?

Or are they the same?

From yesterday’s Jordan Graham/Owen Boss piece in the Boston Herald:

Public shock unlikely to derail GE deal

Critics blast tax breaks

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Massive tax breaks that helped bring General Electric’s world headquarters to the Hub are being blasted by critics for creating too sweet a deal for the global conglomerate — but don’t expect a public movement like the one that derailed the Boston 2024 Olympic bid to sidetrack the relocation.

In exchange for agreeing to move its global headquarters to the booming Seaport District, GE will get $145 million in grants and tax breaks from the city and state. But under the agreement, Boston will also pay up to $100 million to fix the dilapidated Northern Avenue Bridge . . .

 

Then again, there’s Shirley Leung’s column in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

Out with the old, Lynch says

The Northern Avenue Bridge could soon fall down, and US Representative Stephen Lynch is ready to release $9.4 northern ave. bridge 1-175606million in federal funding to help design a new one.

The city will need to match a portion of the money, but Lynch has been waiting more than a decade for Boston to do something about the century-old span. Last week, officials said they plan to start removing the dilapidated bridge in March after the Coast Guard raised concerns that it might tumble into the Fort Point Channel.

 

But here’s the headscratching part:

The Walsh administration will begin a formal public process this spring to decide whether to rehab the bridge or build a new one. The city has to do something after committing up to $100 million to replace the link as part of its agreement to woo General Electric Co.’s world headquarters to Boston.

 

Except the Herald says the commitment is to fix the link, not replace it.

So, to recap:

The local dailies agree that the Northern Avenue Bridge is dilapidated.

But, as Leung might say, will the state fix it or nix it?

You tell us.


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