‘Next’ Ad-dition to the Boston $unday Globe

November 17, 2014

Granted, the hardreading staff is well into the early (there’s that characteristic optimism!) stages of its dotage, but we don’t recall ever seeing this particular section in the Boston Sunday Globe.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 12.30.50 AM

 

Regardless, the Next section is a gold(en-years)mine of advertising. Representative (facing pages) sample:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 12.35.13 AM

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 12.35.30 AM

 

That comes on the heels of last week’s new sections Chill and Longwood: A City Within the City.

Do we see a pattern emerging here?


In Like Flynn at the Boston Herald

November 14, 2014

Score one for the Boston Herald: Today’s feisty local tabloid beats its crosstown rival to a juicy local story.

Start at the top of Page One:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 11.29.25 AM

 

 

The story inside:

 

New Flap in Bid to Honor Flynn

A panel headed by City Council President Bill Linehan is floating the controversial idea of naming the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center — a key landmark closely linked to the recently deceased Mayor Thomas M. Menino — after former Mayor Raymond L. Flynn.

The proposal, included in a press release yesterday by the Raymond L. Flynn Commission headed by the STON1922.JPGSouth Boston councilor, met with immediate resistance from longtime city observers who worked with both mayors.

“Ray Flynn and Tom Menino were both old friends and they both deserve recognition, but I was in the trenches when I represented the City Council in the late 1990s, and Tom Menino was the person who drove the construction of the convention center, there’s no doubt about that,” said Larry DiCara, a former council president.

 

Along with that piece the Herald includes the obligatory reader reaction and also – awkward!this column by the paper’s occasional chinstroker, Ray Flynn himself.

It was always about serving Hub’s people

2V0R6598.JPG

At the outset, let me say I never wanted my name on any city building or billboard — not even a sign at a baseball field.

But I am humbled by the kind gesture of Boston City Councilor Bill Linehan and his committee in recognizing my service to the people of Boston over the years.

The honor of serving the city I love was always enough for me. Working hard every day and doing the best I could for the needy and those without a political voice was all I ever wanted to do.

 

And etc.

Linehan – as he so often does – started moonwalking as soon as his trial balloon drew the least bit of heat. Right now, we know something will be named after Flynn and something after Menino – details TBA.

Details also TBA in the Boston Globe, which at post time had nothing on the naming rumpus.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 11.00.31 AM

 

Maybe the stately local broadsheet should give Ray Flynn a column, eh?


Pick One: Boston Globe Majors in (U)Mass Marketing or, Boston Globe Pimps Out Page One

November 13, 2014

The Boston Globe is having quite a financial fling with the University of Massachusetts these days. First it was this “Special Supplement to the Boston Globe” that ran this past Sunday.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.19.16 PM

 

As the hardreading staff noted, that’s “Special” as in “Advertising,” which the Globe would have stated explicitly if it cared to be honest with its readers.

Now comes this doozie in today’s edition of the $tately local broadsheet (photos courtesy of the Missus).

 

IMG_4197

 

That was followed by this:

 

IMG_4196

 

Along with this:

 

IMG_4193

 

And this:

 

IMG_4191

 

At least they labeled the wraparound “Advertisement,” eh? But it’s the leasing out of the Globe banner that’s the problem here. Funny thing is, ten years ago the Globe rejected that kind of sellout. From the January 19, 2004 Boston Business Journal:

Globe rejected a front-page advertisement for JetBlue

The Boston Globe apparently rejected a proposal by JetBlue Airways Corp. to run the same full front-page advertisement touting the airline’s arrival at Logan International Airport that the Boston Herald published last week amid voluble criticism.
The Boston Herald ended up running the ad on Jan. 7, catching considerable flak for accepting an ad that one source valued at least at $25,000. But a JetBlue official told the Boston Business Journal that the Globe also was approached with the same opportunity.

 

And turned it down, sort of.

Globe spokesman B. Maynard Scarborough said he believed the newspaper’s advertising department discussed selling a “wrap” to JetBlue, but no deal was reached. Such a wrap would not have contained mock editorial content, he said, adding the Globe does not sell Page 1 advertising and has no plans to do so.

 

Well, that’s now “inoperative,” as they say.

Here’s what the Herald did run (via WBUR’s Bob Oakes).

 

1540124

 

That’s the actual front page on the left, the ad front page on the right.

And while we’re tripping down Memory Lane with local journos, here’s what the redoubtable Dan Kennedy wrote in the Boston Phoenix Media Log back then:

[A]t the very least, the front should have been prominently labeled as an ad. This isn’t just a violation of the traditional wall separating business and editorial – this is an out-and-out demolition.

 

Today at Media Nation, Dan wrote this: “If the Globe hasn’t crossed a line, perhaps it has moved the line past where we always thought it was.”

Fair enough. But to us, they did cross the line.


Herald Has Healthy Edge in Obamacare Dustup

November 12, 2014

There’s a nifty little rumpus underway over a gaffe by a local healthcare guru who sort of told the truth by accident.

It all got started a few days ago when an outfit called American Commitment posted this video:

 

 

In yesterday’s edition, the Boston Herald was on it like Brown on Williamson.

Obamacare architect blasted for ‘deliberate deception’

An MIT professor considered one of the architects of Obamacare is being blasted by critics over a video they say shows him admitting the law’s “lack of transparency” was designed to dupe a gullible American public.

Jonathan Gruber, an economics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, made the explosive comments that have now gone viral on the Internet as a panelist during a lecture on “The Role of Economics in Shaping the ACA” at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School on Oct. 17, 2013

 

Gruber then hied himself to the friendly confines of MSNBC for damage control.

 

 

But that did nothing to mollify the projectile pundits on the right.

 

 

Today the feisty local tabloid ran this follow-up:

Regrets over remarks on ‘stupidity’ of voters

George Gosner Jr, Spring Insurance Group     Jonathon Gruber, Massachusetts Institute of Technology     AndrŽs L—pez, AJL Consultants     Louis Malzone, Massachusetts Coalition of Taft-Hardly Funds     Nancy Turnbull, Harvard School of Public Health     Celia Wcislo, 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East     Ian Duncan, Solucia Inc.

Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber yesterday walked back his controversial remarks that a “lack of transparency” triggered by the “stupidity of the American voter” helped pass the embattled health care law, saying he “spoke inappropriately.”

“The comments in the video were made in an academic conference,” Gruber told MSNBC yesterday. “I was speaking off the cuff, and I basically spoke inappropriately. And I regret having made those comments.”

Gruber declined a Herald request for an interview.

 

Big surprise, yeah?

Also not surprising: The Boston Globe has ignored the whole donnybrook.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 12.26.00 PM

 

So what else is news?


Boston Globe Special Sections Are Serious Ad-ditions

November 10, 2014

As the hardreading staff plowed through yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe, we were struck by all the special sections it featured: Chill, Longwood: A City Within the City, and 11 Ideas from Boston 2014.

That last stood out because of what was printed at the top of each page:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.19.16 PM

 

Close-up for the bifocal set:

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.28.07 PM

 

There were ads sprinkled throughout the “Special Supplement,” such as this one:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.24.40 PM

 

But we think the whole section is an ad – at least that’s the implication. Here’s another clue from an inside page:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.30.50 PM

 

The other two sections – Chill and Longwood: A City Within the City – are run-of-the-mill news sections designed to be ad magnets in particular categories.

Longwood first.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.16.03 PM

 

Representative ads:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.16.30 PM

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.17.21 PM

 

Then Chill.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.17.43 PM

 

This section was an absolute ad bonanza. Representative samples:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.51.49 PM

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 1.18.14 PM

 

Our prediction: Look for lots more of this in the future, especially the “Special Supplements.” Maybe next time the Globe bean counters could be a little more transparent about what they’re serving to their readers.


Why Does the Boston Ad Club Hate the Herald?

November 8, 2014

The hardreading staff has always loved the Hatch Awards (a.k.a. The Night of the Long Knives), which annually honor the best advertising campaigns in New England.

From a previous life:

 

Picture-22

 

(Warning: Dr. Ads is not a licensed physician.)

Yesterday the Ad Club ran this celebratory ad in the Boston Globe.

Screen Shot 2014-11-08 at 12.18.35 AM

Best of Show went to Mullen (the ad agency that initiated the Night of the Long Knives when it velvet-roped-off its seating area one Hatch night back in the ’80s).

P.S. The Ad Club ad did not run in the Boston Herald.

Just like last year.

Par for the (of) course.


Hark! The Herald! (Charlie Baker’s House! Edition)

November 7, 2014

The Boston Herald has its promo mojo working overtime today.

From Joe Battenfeld’s piece:

National office for Charlie Baker? Nope, and you can believe it

Sick of governors with a flair for fancy speeches and a nose for the national
stage?

Massachusetts, here comes your man.

“Not to worry,” Gov.-elect Charlie Baker said in a Boston Herald interview. “I will not be a governor who gets involved in national politics.”

Sure, you’ve heard that one before. Michael Dukakis. Bill Weld. Mitt Romney. Deval Patrick. They all said they just wanted to be a great governor — right before they booked flights to Iowa.

But with Baker, he probably means it.

 

Accent on “probably.”

And accent on “Boston Herald interview,” as if the flirty local tabloid was the only girl Baker danced with yesterday. (His spotlight dance with the Boston Globe is here. In that interview – in his home – he also “expressed little desire to get involved in national Republican politics.”)

Just so you don’t forget, the Herald photo captions also tell the tale.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 11.35.44 AM

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 11.36.37 AM

 

And, even better than the Heraldniks going to Charlie’s house, he went to their house this morning.

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 11.36.10 AM

 

Isn’t that special?


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,303 other followers