Eagan v. Remy, Round 2

April 1, 2014

As the hardreading staff previously noted, last week Herald columnist Margery Eagan went sour on NESN broadcaster Jerry Remy’s return to the booth, and, in an interview on WEEI’s Dennis & Callahan show, Pres. Red Sox Nation returned the flavor, ripping Eagan’s column without naming her. (Neither, oddly, did the Herald in reporting the Remy interview.)

Ding!

Today the Boston Strong Girl is back in the ring, counterpunching with this piece.

Put anger aside, do what’s right, Jerry Remy

They tell me I ticked off Jerry Remy.

Last week I wrote a column asking why Jerry and Phoebe Remy would seek custody of their granddaughter Arianna. Their son is in jail, accused of stabbing W2ST6100.JPGArianna’s mother to death. Remy’s other two children also have a history of arrests for violent attacks.

Questioning his ability to be Arianna’s grandparent made Jerry Remy mad. He went on WEEI with Herald columnist Gerry Callahan and called what I wrote “disgusting.”

Well, I may disgust him again today for asking why he won’t do the right thing by Red Sox Nation and step aside at NESN.

 

(Fun fact to know and tell: Eagan went to high school in Fall River with Phoebe Remy.)

Eagan concludes with this: “[E]verywhere you look along the long, ugly road that put Jared [in jail], you see Jerry and Phoebe Remy, too. There just can’t be a RemDawg anymore.”

Okay. You’re on deck, BlemDawg.

 


Remy Smartin’ in Boston Dailies?

March 25, 2014

Well, yes and no.

Jared Remy’s certainly hurting after the Boston Globe blowtorched him on Page One Sunday. (In that piece, it should be noted, the stately local broadsheet yet again failed to disclose that Red Sox principal owner John Henry also owns the paper. Or is the hardreading staff the only one who still cares about that kind of stuff?)

Jerry Remy? Jury’s still out.

Start with Gerry Callahan’s full-throated support in today’s Boston Herald.

Red Sox job is Jerry Remy’s call

At what point do you give up on a kid?

When exactly do you throw up your hands, turn your back and walk away from your own child?_CE29101.JPG

Jerry and Phoebe Remy are the parents of a 35-year-old monster with a long history of hurting women — particularly pregnant ones — but they haven’t reached that point yet. Their son Jared is evil to the core, but they still visit him in jail. They presumably pay for his lawyers. They probably hope and pray he will once again come before a pliable Massachusetts judge and avoid the harshest penalties allowed by law.

Somehow this doesn’t sit well with many Red Sox fans who think Jerry Remy should no longer be allowed to sit in the NESN booth with Don Orsillo and talk about baseball.

 

 

But it sits okay with Callahan, who ends his piece this way: “Jerry Remy admits he made mistakes and he knows things will never be the same for Remdawg Inc. But he shouldn’t be stripped of his livelihood and sent home to stare at the walls. Jared should go to prison for the rest of his life. Jerry should go back to work, and, finally and at last, give up on his rotten, hopeless kid.”

Crosstown at the Globe, not everyone is so forgiving. Alan Wirzbicki in a point-counterpoint with Alex Beam:

[I]f Jerry Remy sold used cars, then maybe none of it would matter. The questionable decisions an employee makes with his own paycheck are usually his own business.

But Jerry Remy doesn’t sell used cars. His job is to be a particular TV persona — the gentle, chuckling color commentator on Sox games. Playing that role has made him popular. But now that’s not an image that he can project without turning New England’s collective stomach.

 

Now it’s Beam’s turn:

I understand that when most people read the story of Jerry and Jared, they see an entitled, well-off sports celebrity gaming the legal system on behalf of his wild and dangerous son. I see something different: a complicated, confusing morass, of biblical pain inflicted on a family that wants to balance its love for a disturbed davis_st2278_sptschild against society’s legitimate expectations of personal safety.

Jared is in jail, where he belongs. I’m sure his father and his family are living in a special kind of hell. If the sins of the son are visited on the father, well, that’s not what I call justice.

 

But it’s what a letter to the Globe editor does. Here’s Frank Hannon of Melrose:

CONCERNING THE return of sportscaster Jerry Remy to the booth as his son, Jared, awaits trial in the murder of his girlfriend: Perhaps charity demands that NESN be given the benefit of the doubt about what the network knew of the elder Remy’s role in the repeated enabling of his son. However, the Globe’s expose of the monumentally sordid circumstances of Jared Remy’s record removes all doubt (“For Jared Remy, leniency was the rule until one lethal night,” Page A1, March 23).

Who will be able to watch Remy without being reminded of the unimaginable havoc wrought by his son? Even for crass economic reasons alone, let alone the basic duty of social responsibility that NESN owes the community — and yes, there is such a thing — how can NESN possibly allow Remy to stay on the air?

 

If you’re looking for a tiebreaker, try the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation.  He has an interesting conversation going on in the comments thread.

 


David Ortiz Gets Respect/No Respect from Boston Dailies

February 7, 2014

Fact #1: David Ortiz is unquestionably the greatest clutch hitter in Boston Red Sox history. Fact #2: David Ortiz is 38 years old (at least). Fact #3: David Ortiz will make $15 million this coming season. Fact #4: David Ortiz wants more.

Let the Big Papirama begin!

Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy one week ago.

David Ortiz’s contract talk is selfish, offensive

 

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.33.00 AM

 

David Ortiz was on Boston television the other night. Guess what he was talking about?

His contract.

Big Papi loves to complain about his contract. He’s never satisfied unless he has a multiyear contract. It’s about respect, I guess.

Sorry, but it’s also tone-deaf, selfish, and offensive.

 

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, Gerry Callahan wrote this:

David Oriz can wait

With Papi destined to stay, Ben should avoid long-term deal

 

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First off, let’s paint the whole picture.

David Ortiz didn’t just demand a contract extension from the Red Sox on “Sports Final” with Steve Burton on Sunday night. He demanded a contract extension while holding a white Chihuahua on his lap. And he didn’t just demand a contract extension while holding a white Chihuahua. He demanded a contract extension while holding a white Chihuahua that was wearing a yellow sweater.

 

Chihua-whatever.

Cut to yesterday’s Christopher L. Gasper Globe column.

Ortiz contract request fair, not foul

 

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Ask and you shall receive, or if you’re Red Sox slugger David Ortiz, ask about a contract extension and you shall receive criticism, ridicule, and indignation for daring to ask . . .

Ortiz has drawn the ire of some Red Sox fans and media members [read: fellow Globie Shaughnessy] this winter for having the gall to repeatedly express his desire for a one-year contract extension with a year still remaining on the two-year pact he signed in November of 2012. Ortiz made $15 million last season, and is on the books for another $15 million this season.

Sometimes athletes just can’t win. Failure to express unequivocal desire to stay with a team beyond your current contract brands you disloyal, selfish, and greedy. Expressing a clear preference to stay with a team before your contract is up makes you insolent, selfish, and greedy.

 

You decide, yeah?

 


Hark! The Herald! (Big Papi Edition)

October 16, 2013

From our Walt Whitman desk

Today’s Boston Herald has a swell time patting itself on the back for yet another mention by “Journalism’s own hall of fame” – that would be The Newseum – in its daily Top Ten Front Pages feature.

Under the headline “Sports Stories” there’s this:

When a sports story makes the front page, it usually gets the best play. Just look at today’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which devoted half of Page One to the Cardinals’ baseball playoff loss. Of course, newspapers aren’t always so keen to promote defeat. The Indianapolis Star found a way to downplay the Colts’ loss in “Monday Night Football” by focusing on the positive. Go team!

 

You don’t have to tell the feisty local tabloid twice.

 

Picture 2

 

And don’t miss that dig at crosstown rival Boston Globe:

The Herald was the only Boston paper featured in the Top 10 list yesterday. The Herald’s front page was even tweeted out by Red Sox owner John W. Henry.

 

You know he’s gonna own the Globe too, right?

It doesn’t get much better than that for the Heraldniks.


Jock Shock: WEEI’s Jason Wolfe Punchout

August 16, 2013

The local dailies turn a quick double play today in their coverage of the shakeup at former sportstalk powerhouse WEEI.

Start with the Boston Herald, which goes all Page One over the firing of longtime WEEI VP of programming/operations  Jason Wolfe – except it’s really about Gerry Callahan, a WEEL morning drive personality and a sports columnist for the feisty local tabloid in his spare time.

 

Picture 1

 

The inside story:

IMG_1889.JPG’EEI assures duo after boss axed

WEEI morning men John Dennis and Gerry Callahan — blindsided by the firing of boss Jason Wolfe yesterday — said they have been assured that station suits want them to be “part of the solution” to the once-dominant sports station’s ratings woes.

Callahan, a Herald sports columnist, said Entercom Boston general manager Jeff Brown told him and Kirk Minihane, who was added to the morning show in February, that “we’re going nowhere.” And Dennis, who is on vacation this week, said Brown called him after Wolfe got the ax to reiterate that the morning show was not in any danger.

 

“We’re going nowhere,” eh? All depends on how you hold that one up to the light.

The Herald throws some stats into the mix as well, which illustrate the drubbing WEEI has taken from CBS-owned 98.5 The Sports Hub:

In the most recent ratings period, The Sports Hub’s top-rated morning show, Toucher and Rich, dominated with a 13.4 share. Dennis and Callahan finished fifth with a 6.0. The Sports Hub was No. 1 overall with men age 25-54, both stations’ target audience, while WEEI was fifth, according to Arbitron.

 

For dessert, the Herald serves up some Howiesnark:

 

Picture 3

 

And etc.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, sports media columnist Chad Finn provides more narrative background.

For all of Wolfe’s success at WEEI, he was also complicit in its recent struggles and the attitude that got it there. The station easily vanquished upstart challengers such as WWZN 1510 and ESPN 890 during the 2000s. Neither station had the signal or the resources of WEEI. But in continuing its dominance, the station’s hubris rose, and it radiated as arrogance through the airwaves.

There was a collective sense that those at WEEI believed their success was much more to do with them than with their comparatively strong signal, their broadcast rights deals (particularly with the Red Sox), and Boston fans’ insatiable desire for any level of sports discourse.

 

But then came The Sports Hub, and ‘EEI got smoked.

When 98.5 The Sports Hub launched in August 2009 — a station with CBS Radio’s support, broadcast rights deals with the Patriots and Bruins, and a strong FM signal — WEEI was outwardly dismissive of the potential competition despite its vast resources.

And its complacent actions — including dotting its programming with back-slapping D-list personalities — suggested [The Sports Hub] was just one more competitor that would fade to static soon enough.

 

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Official Campaign Outsider Prediction: Dennis & Callahan are gone in six weeks.


Globe: Ortiz Okay; Herald: Papicock!

March 5, 2013

The jury is very much out on David Ortiz in the local dailies.

From Nick Cafardo’s piece in today’s Boston Globe:

2013-03-04T210923Z_01_FTM07_RTRMDNP_3_BASEBALLSteady progress has David Ortiz feeling upbeat

FORT MYERS, Fla. — David Ortiz feels more optimistic that he’ll be in the Opening Day lineup after running the bases Monday and feeling as if he can manage the expected soreness in his Achilles’.

“It feels good,” Ortiz said. “When I get going I’m fine. The problem is once I cool off, I start to get sore, but the doctor said it will go away. It’s just part of the treatment, part of [when you] start doing things. The injury, you got to start getting used to. That’s why we practice over and over and over and over. So you can get to that point . . . it’s a good day. I was moving pretty good. I don’t think I can run faster than that. Let’s just see how things go later on tonight.”

 

Not so fast there, Big Guy.

From Gerry Callahan’s column in today’s Boston Herald:

STON1530.JPGAging David Ortiz may be Sox’ Achilles’ heel

Much depends on Papi’s health

If he were playing Old Man Basketball at the Y, we’d take him across the street for a couple of beers and let him down easy. It’s not the end of the world, we’d tell him. You can still play golf. You can still walk the dog. You’re still reasonably young and healthy, and you’ve got your whole life ahead of you.

You just can’t do this anymore.

 

For a tiebreaker we turn to this random thought from the Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy:

The David Ortiz Achilles’ situation is especially alarming given that he sustained the injury rounding second base in front of a home run hit by Adrian Gonzalez. That’s like Tony Soprano straining his Achilles’ walking down the driveway to pick up the morning newspaper.

 

Ouch.


Gronkpocalypse 2! (Formerly Gronkmageddon 2!)

November 20, 2012

The Boston Herald is a bit bipolar in its Gronkoverage of the Patriots tight end, who broke his arm on a meaningless play in Sunday’s rout of the Indianapolis Colts.

(Front page: THE GRONK CRISIS. Back page: GOTTA MOVE ON.)

But the feisty local tabloid is absolutely sure that the Gronkastrophe deserves four full pages in today’s edition.

Start with this Duh! headline in the news section:

Doctors: Best play is to let it fully heal

Despite the public clamor and Rob Gronkowski’s obvious determination to return as soon as he can from a broken forearm, the general consensus from medical professionals is that the 23-year-old All-Pro tight end should err on the side of caution — even if it means missing the start of the playoffs.

Dr. David Forsh, chief of orthopedic trauma at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, said that Gronkowski could potentially be sidelined up to eight weeks. Even when the tight end gets his cast off, he could be delayed with more rehabilitation to get his range of motion and strength back.

“The concern with these fractures is not how soon they heal, which is normally about 6-8 weeks, but when he’d be able to return to play,” Forsh said. “It really depends on how he does with his rehab and how quickly he heals it.”

The print edition has a swell illustration with all kinds of medical claptrap to obsess over.

Then there’s this piece on the facing page:

Patriots must break the mold in life minus Gronkowski

All-Pro tight end’s absence won’t be filled by just one player

FOXBORO — Sunday afternoon, Rob Gronkowski ran over, around and past hapless Colts players, debilitating Indy with his full arsenal of skill, brawn and athleticism.

Today, those are mere highlights to a Patriots [team stats] team and fan base that now must bear life without their All-World tight end.

Gronkowski had successful surgery yesterday morning and had a metal plate inserted into his broken left forearm. He told people Sunday night that he would miss 4-6 weeks, according to sources, and a separate source said he would miss “a few weeks” after yesterday’s procedure. Unless there’s a drastic change, those sources all believe he’ll be back for the playoffs.

Then it’s on to the sports section for two more pages of coverage, starting with this Ron Borges column:

No ‘extra’ work needed

Silly to play Gronkowski on special teams

FOXBORO – The argument that Rob Gronkowski should not have been on the field when he broke his forearm blocking for an extra point because his team was leading by 34 points Sunday is a specious one.

The argument that he should not be blocking for extra points and field goals at any time is not.

And then finish it all off with this Gerry Callahan piece:

No Gronk? Next man up

While fans gnash teeth, Pats shrug off injury and move on

The news broke one hour and 43 minutes after the forearm did. From the parking lots to the private boxes, from barrooms to living rooms, Patriots [team stats] fans were in a panic.

Did you hear? Gronk was down. Gronk was out.

The news was bad, real bad: Gronk broke.

Just like the hardreading staff’s patience with this story.

Regardless, we dutifully trundled crosstown to the Boston Globe to see if they’d developed more of a sense of urgency than they exhibited yesterday.

And indeed they had:

Can we go now?

 


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