The Herald Runs on Dunkin’

September 29, 2014

As our Walt Whitman desk attests on a regular basis, the Boston Herald is a past master at using its newshole to promote . . . that’s right – the Herald. And now apparently, the fuzzy local tabloid is offering the same sort of ad-itorial package to its advertisers.

Witness the latest installment of the paper’s daily plug for Boston Herald Radio, the webcast that up to several people a day listen to.

 

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Nice bit of venial synergy for Dunkin’ Donuts, eh? Lede of the “interview” at left.

Todd Wallace, field marketing manager for Dunkin’ Donuts, joined Boston Herald Radio’s “Morning Meeting” with Hillary Chabot and Joe Battenfeld to talk about the iconic coffee chain’s new products.

 

You gotta hear this segment to believe it. Those Heraldniks sure can take the r out of radio.


Hark! The Herald! (Democratic Guv Debate)

August 25, 2014

From our Walt Whitman desk

So. Is the Massachusetts Democratic gubernatorial primary primarily – inexorably – changed now that the candidates have had their debate on Boston Herald Radio?

‘Cause that’s what today’s feisty local tabloid promised.

Start, as  always, with Page On, the top half of which touts the Big Bakeoff.

 

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Inside, the Herald has two pages of new/hype in anticipation of the main event.

 

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Tale of the tape:

 

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And just in case you haven’t grasped the transformative power of a debate on Internet radio, the Herald scribes all strike the same chord in their ledes.

Jaclyn Cashman:

Leave your talking points at the door. Save your stump speeches for the campaign trail. At today’s Boston Herald Radio debate, we’re aiming for a free-flowing conversation where we’ll learn more about the three candidates facing off in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

 

Joe Battenfeld:

It’s a long shot, but there’s still a way for Attorney General Martha Coakley to lose the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and it would have to start at today’s Boston Herald Radio debate.

Coakley’s campaign is showing signs of cracking. Democratic party leaders are getting worried it will be 2010 all over again.

 

John Nucci:

Believe it or not, the primary election is just over two weeks away, and Democrats face a critical choice on who will represent their party in November. The timing of today’s Democratic gubernatorial debate on Boston Herald Radio makes it pivotal, and likely to set the tone for the closing days.

 

As of 1 pm – the debate’s over, the poll numbers are out – here’s the only coverage the hardsearching staff could find: A Boston Globe online recap.

In bitter debate, Democratic gubernatorial candidates take aim at each other, Baker

In the most bitter debate of Democratic gubernatorial race so far, Treasurer Steven Grossman sharply questioned the judgment of frontrunner Martha Coakley, painting her a protector of the Beacon Hill establishment, as former Medicare and Medicaid chief Don Berwick attacked his two rivals for their support of casino gambling in the state and their years-long embrace of “politics as usual.”

Coakley, the attorney general, defended herself, offered a few hits on Grossman, but also aimed some fire at Republican Charlie Baker, who is expected to be his party’s gubernatorial nominee.

Just over two weeks before the Sept. 9 state primary, the three Democratic candidates vying for their party’s nod upped their rhetoric against each other right from the beginning of an hour-long Boston Herald Radio debate at the newspaper’s Seaport headquarters.

 

Oh, wait – here’s the Herald recap:

Coakley, Grossman and Berwick let loose on Herald Radio debate

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The debate between the Democratic candidates for governor kicked off in high gear today as Treasurer Steve Grossman went on the attack over Attorney General Martha Coakley’s $100,000 settlement with a lobbying group.

“It’s the worst form of judgment,” said Grossman, who slammed what he called the go-easy environment on Beacon Hill.

 

Not so easy-going off Beacon Hill though.

The Herald knows it’s not who listened to the web stream of the debate that will determine its impact. It’s the play the debate gets in the rest of the news media that counts.

Stay tuned.

 


Hark! The Herald! (Radio Daze Edition)

August 8, 2014

From our Walt Whitman desk

It’s been one year since the feisty local tabloid launched Boston Herald Radio, and the paper is celebrating the anniversary in its accustomed style.

Start, as usual, with Page One.

 

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“Best yet to come”? That’s good to hear.

Inside, the firsty local tabloid devotes a full-page, Joe Battenfeld-bylined piece to the anniversary bash.

 

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Our favorite part:

Herald Radio’s launch was named to the prestigious Frontier Fifty list of outstanding talk media webcasts in the nation by industry bible Talkers Magazine.

 

Which got the headscratching staff to wondering: How many talk media webcasts are there in the nation?

We couldn’t find the answer on the Googletron (we’re guessing it’s a lot), but we did locate BHR on the Frontier Fifty:

 

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Let’s hope Boston Herald Radio’s second anniversary headline is, We’re Number 35! We’re Number 35!

Good luck, guys, and happy anniversary.


Is One Local Daily Baker Dozin’?

April 24, 2014

Today’s Boston dailies have two different views about GOP gubernatorial hopeful Charlie Baker’s campaign-finance prospects – one good, the other not so much.

The Boston Globe’s Frank Phillips has this story:

Scott Brown’s candidacy could hurt Charlie Baker

Analysts see more GOP money and resources going to New Hampshire’s US Senate battle

 

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Scott Brown’s entrance into New Hampshire’s US Senate race has created a political and media firestorm that some analysts believe will damage critical underpinnings of Charlie Baker’s gubernatorial candidacy in Massachusetts.

Many of the state and national Republican resources that would have been showered on Baker’s race for governor — in terms of fund-raising, strategists, and manpower — will now be directed at Brown’s challenge to Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

Just as problematic for Baker is the huge amount of money that will pour into the Boston media market, aimed at southern New Hampshire, to boost Brown’s candidacy in what the national GOP and the Democrats see as a key battleground over control of the Senate . . .

 

That translates into several potential problems for Baker. Start with independent expenditure groups and party committees scooping up big chunks of commercial inventory on Boston TV stations, leaving less desirable slots for Baker. Then factor in the inevitable smashmouth nature of the spots on both sides of the Granite State bakeoff; some of the mud slung at Brown will surely land on Baker as well.

So, to recap: Fewer dollars, worse ad placement, geld by association.

Then again, crosstown at the Boston Herald Two-Time Charlie’s prospects look much sunnier. Page One, lower half:

 

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This one is Joe Battenfeld’s story:

Super PACs Join Fray

May pour big $ into governor’s race

Two new Super PACs — one Democratic and one Republican — have jumped into the Massachusetts gubernatorial race, the latest sign that shadowy special DSC_1259.JPGinterest groups and power brokers will be pouring millions of dollars into the race for the Corner Office.

One of the Super PACs, called “Massachusetts Forward Together,” has a clear purpose — to “support the gubernatorial candidacy of Steve Grossman,” according to papers filed yesterday with the state’s campaign finance office. Grossman, the state treasurer, is a Democratic candidate for governor.

The other Super PAC, chaired by longtime Republican strategist Beth Lindstrom, appears to be an effort to support the candidacy of Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker. Neither of the organizations has reported spending any money yet.ADP_0008.JPG

Lindstrom’s PAC has the intentionally vague name of “Commonwealth Future” and its stated purpose is “to support candidates who create jobs, grow the Massachusetts economy and improve education,” according to its filing with the state.

 

So, to recap:

Maybe Charlie Baker’s in good shape.

Maybe not.

But only if you read both dailies.

 


Herald Devalues Patrick Speech

January 29, 2014

Last night Gov. Deval Patrick (D-Lame Duck Dynasty) delivered his last State of the Commonwealth speech, and today’s Boston Herald is on it like Brown on Williamson.

Start, quite naturally, on Page One:

 

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Inside, the Gov guff spreads across two pages (and a warm Two-Daily Town welcome back to the entirely random Little Green 1!).

 

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Howie Carr’s column features his usual mail-in mutterings, while Joe Battenfeld’s piece begins “There is no ‘I’ in team, but there definitely is one in Patrick.” (As my brother Bob says, there may be no I in team, but there is Eat Me.)

Then there’s the obligatory tsk-tsking editorial, and an editorial cartoon from the ever-clever Jerry Holbert.

 

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Combined, it’s a Full Herald, the journalistic equivalent of a Full Newark (white necktie, white belt, white shoes).

Attention-getting, but tough to look at for too long.

 


What Can Brown Do for New (Hampshire)?

December 18, 2013

Today’s local dailies have his ‘n’ his takes on the peripatetic Scott Brown (R-Elsewhere).

Start with the Boston Globe’s twofer: a news report about Brown’s impending move to the Granite State, and this editorial dopeslap.

In most states, such an obviously opportunistic move would present an obstacle to any kind of political future. But Massachusetts and New Hampshire are paired in an interesting way. A rejection of Massachusetts-style taxation and intrusive government is an important part of the New Hampshire narrative. Alas, so too is a deep suspicion of artifice or pretense.

The qualities that made Brown appealing to Massachusetts voters — affability and a middle-of-the-road approach to governing — will play as well, or perhaps even better, in New Hampshire. But the quality that ultimately led to his defeat in 2012 — the lack of a substantial agenda, leading to concerns about the seriousness with which he engages national problems — may be even more brutally exposed in New Hampshire.

 

Not to mention he’s a carpetbagging moderate who’s soft on guns rights.

The Boston Herald’s Joe Battenfeld says Brown will have to scramble in more ways than one:

There are certain things you have to do in the Granite State, like being subjected to direct and sometimes uncomfortable questions from voters. No dodging the media glare, either. Giving a speech, shaking some hands and fleeing to the safety of the pickup truck won’t cut it.

Here are some other suggestions for Brown:_DSC8035.JPG

• Don’t pronounce Berlin like the city in Germany. The locals won’t like that very much.

• Don’t say that you’re looking forward to seeing the Old Man of the Mountain. It’s not there anymore . . .

• And please don’t try to pretend you love guns and like to hunt “varmints.”

 

Then again, early indications are Brown will have lots of help if he is interested in running. From Politico’s Morning Score:

National Republicans are encouraging Brown to run, and see him as the party’s only chance to make that race competitive. Now, as James Hohmann reports, the GOP group Ending Spending is dropping $100,000 on a new ad hitting [Democratic Sen. Jeanne] Shaheen and running online ads to draft Brown (http://politi.co/199Cl8r).

 

Here’s the website. And here’s the TV spot hitting Shaheen with the Obamacare stick (kicker: “So next November, if you like your Senator, you can keep her. If you don’t, you know what to do . . . “):

 

 

Of course, first Scott Brown needs to decide what to do.


More Than One Hitch to Baker/Polito Union

December 4, 2013

The shotgun wedding between Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker and lieutenant governor hopeful Karyn Polito had its engagement announcement in Monday’s Boston Globe.

Running mate issue gets thornier for Charlie Baker

Karyn E. Polito, the former Republican legislator who lost a 2010 run for state treasurer, is poised to announce her candidacy for lieutenant governor this week, a move that puts GOP gubernatorial favorite Charlie Baker in a difficult spot as he ponders a potential running mate.

Polito, a 47-year old Shrewsbury resident, is expected to declare as early as Tuesday that she will seek the nomination for the second spot on the 2014 10282010_28treasurer_photo3-7754405gubernatorial ticket, according to several state Republicans with knowledge of her plans.

Baker is expected to lead the ticket, and Polito’s candidacy would pose a politically ticklish question for him: whether to try to control the makeup of his ticket, as he successfully did in his 2010 run for governor, or to leave the decision to voters.

Having Polito as a running mate could be both an asset and a potential liability.

 

And etc.

The GOPpy couple tied the knot in today’s edition of our stately local broadsheet.

Charlie Baker picks Karyn Polito as running mate

Nod to conservatives may also help him with women voters

SHREWSBURY — Charlie Baker, the leading Republican candidate for governor, named former state representative Karyn Polito as his running mate Tuesday, presenting voters with a unified ticket fully 11 months before the gubernatorial election.

Polito’s selection serves as an overture to party conservatives, among whom she is popular, and as an effort to raise Baker’s standing among female voters, a baker-bigconstituency he lost heavily when he ran for the corner office in 2010.

Her hometown of Shrewsbury also bolsters Baker’s candidacy in Worcester County, a stronghold for Republicans in recent elections.

Polito, in her 2010 bid for state treasurer, racked up more votes than Baker did in the three-way race for governor. As she announced her candidacy at a Shrewsbury diner on Tuesday, she said she wants voters to see her as a “mom, a business owner, and an optimist.”

 

Leave it to the Boston Herald, though, to crash the reception.

Insider: Pick not Charlie’s first choice

Former State Rep. Karyn Polito wasn’t Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker’s first choice — or even his second, according to a source who said Baker considered several other female GOP running mates and even former Attorney General Tom Reilly before settling on Polito.120313politotf05

“It’s not uncommon, when candidates look for running mates, that you get further down the list than you hope to,” said a Republican source close to the Baker campaign. “Discussions were had with a lot of other people, and there were a lot who weren’t interested.”

 

Karyn Polito: mom, business owner, optimist . . . second runner-up. 

According to the piece by Hillary Chabot and Matt Stout, “Baker . . . reached out to Mary Connaughton, a former GOP candidate for auditor, who told the Herald two weeks ago that she turned down the offer because she is happy with her job at the Pioneer Institute.”

Finishing behind Connaughton is one thing, but Tom Reilly? Really?

Today’s feisty local tabloid also has a Joe Battenfeld piece on the Two-Time Charlie/Karyn Enough knot-tying, along with a pro & con honeymoon preview.

(Skunk at the Garden Party honors go to the Globe’s Scot Lehigh, who says Massachusetts should tear the sheets and dump the lieutenant governor’s office altogether, which will happen about the same time Baker and Polito adopt Tim Murray).

The hardreading staff gives that couple 11 months.


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