No Panera Bread Dough for Sunday Boston Herald

June 15, 2015

From our Never-Ending DisADvantage desk

Once again the Boston Herald is, as they say in the Midwest, sucking hind teat.

Exhibit Umpteen: This ad, which ran on page A3 of yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe.


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Nuts to fast food graf:


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The same ad ran in yesterday’s New York Times (which published this Associated Press interview with Panera founder Ron Shaich last month about the chain’s No No List).

But, insult to (financial) injury, there was no ad whatsoever in the Boston Herald, whose readers arguably could use some healthier fare.

One more missed meal for the hungry local tabloid.

Herald Won’t Bushwhack Jeb Over Spanish Lie

April 7, 2015

See what the hardreading staff just did there? We wrote a Boston Herald headline about the Boston Herald.

You splendid readers are no doubt aware of the current rumpus about Jeb “There’s No I in Hispanic” Bush’s identifying himself as “Hispanic” in his 2009 voter registration. That’s normally mother’s milk for the frothy local tabloid, but not in this case. Instead, Jaclyn Cashman defends the next in line of succession at the House of Bush – and takes a whack at Elizabeth Warren in the process.

Unlike Liz Warren, Jeb Bush rises 
above minority misstep

Jeb Bush

The 2016 presidential race could come down to the fake American Indian versus the fake Hispanic.

Jeb Bush reportedly identified himself as Hispanic on a 2009 voter-registration form, and yesterday it sparked a social media firestorm. Bush’s camp sought to downplay the kerfuffle yesterday, releasing a statement saying: “It’s unclear where the paperwork error was made. The governor’s family certainly got a good laugh out of it.”

Bush’s son, Jeb Bush Jr., who is half Mexican, poked fun at his dad on Twitter by using the hashtag #HonoraryLatino. The former Florida governor responded to the tweet, “My mistake! Don’t think I’ve fooled anyone! RT @JebBushJr LOL — come on dad, think you checked the wrong box #HonoraryLatino.”


Self-effacement! Cross-generational humor! Excellent!

Not like those prune faces at the Grey Lady: “The New York Times, which broke the story, isn’t taking this gaffe lightly. ‘Confusion over heritage,’ the paper declared, ‘is no laughing matter during a campaign season.’”

Yeah yeah – whatever.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, Dan Wasserman draws a different line.


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Your punchline goes here.

Boston 2024 Is Now Officially Circling the Drain

April 4, 2015

From our Late to the Going-Away Party desk

Good Friday turned out to be Bad Friday for Store 2024.

As in, all news was bad news for the local machers mucking up the bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Start with yesterday’s Boston Globe (which has generally taken pity on the totally inept Boston 2024niks), where two – count ’em, two – columnists wrote MISTIA (More in Sorrow Than in Anger) pieces about the botched bid.

First, Shirley Leung on the Business front page:

Olympics bid needs a world-class PR save

In all the hand-wringing over the mess that is Boston’s Olympics bid, Doug Rubin has managed to escape scrutiny.

Until now.unnamed(42)

Boston 2024 is awash in problems — and none bigger is the group’s ability to get its message across that the Games can make Boston a better version of itself. The Olympics are supposed to be a feel-good event, but not here. Instead, the Games are toxic, as if organizers are proposing to build a nuclear waste dump on the Greenway.

There’s plenty of blame to go around, from Boston 2024 chairman John Fish to our naysaying selves. But Rubin and his firm Northwind Strategies are most responsible for making sure the public understands why hosting the Summer Games could be good for Boston.


Which the public assuredly does not.

Next, Scot Lehigh on the Globe’s op-ed page:

Taxpayer risk is Boston 2024’s highest hurdle

WHEN IT comes to hosting the Olympics here in 2024, I’m a skeptic. But now that everyone agrees that voters will get to decide the fate of the Olympics bid, I’m a skeptic in a wait-and-see mode.

The threshold question that Boston 2024 faces is crystal clear. Well before the public vote, the group will need to present a convincing plan showing how Boston (or Greater Boston) can host the 2024 Summer Games without putting taxpayers at risk.

So far, what we have are professions of good intentions. “Tax dollars will not be used to build venues or pay for the operation of the Games,” Boston 2024’s new briefing book asserts.

The reality, however, is that at some point, Boston will have to guarantee that the various Olympic venues will be ready. And that means the city could have to step to the plate if plans go seriously awry. Given the deep opposition to using public dollars for the Games, it’s difficult to see how Mayor Marty Walsh could put Boston in that position without an air-tight assurance that taxpayers won’t be left holding the bag.


Ah, yes, Marty Walsh.

Crosstown at the Marty Walsh Gazette (a.k.a. the Boston Herald), the marty local tabloid – which had been a sort of house organ for City Hall until being thrown under the buss on Thursday – was silent yesterday on all matters Olympic.

Which brings us to Friday’s New York Times drive-by hooting.

U.S.O.C. Misjudged Appetite for a Hot Potato


After completing its long, complicated and anything but transparent process of choosing a city as its candidate to host the 2024 Summer Games, the United States Olympic Committee has found itself in an awkward position.

Boston, the city the committee chose to represent the United States, does not appear to want to host the Games at all.

Too expensive, some Bostonians say — the money used to host the Games should be dedicated to improving schools and social programs. Too many people, others say — Boston has terrible traffic, so why invite thousands more to further clog the streets?

Too unnecessary, say those personally hurt by the notion that the Olympics could improve Boston’s image worldwide: Why does Boston need the Olympics to validate it as a world-class city when Bostonians are perfectly happy with Boston as it is?


Except they’re not. Never really have been.

But Bostonians are even less happy with the Olympics. Then again, that’s just one of many problems with the town’s bid. And so, according to the Times, the endgame is near, in the form of the 2016 statewide referendum Boston 2024 has promised.

If recent history is any guide, that public vote will deal the fatal blow to Boston’s chances. Voters in Munich; St. Moritz/Davos, Switzerland; and Krakow, Poland, all batted away their bids for the 2022 Winter Games. Vienna retreated from its 2028 Summer Games bid after a vote, too.


Everyone under the sun has denied this week’s Wall Street Journal report that “the U.S. Olympic Committee may drop Boston’s bid to host the 2024 Summer Games if local support doesn’t improve soon.”

But now comes today’s Boston Herald, which has apparently found a new go-to guy. “Boston 2024 should ‘clean house’ and install a ‘better team’ that can keep a shorter leash on Chairman John Fish and prevent more embarrassing gaffes — like questioning the patriotism of Olympic critics, U.S. Rep. Stephen F. Lynch told the Herald yesterday.”

Oh, right – we had forgotten that one: Bostonians are unpatriotic if they don’t support this game of five-ring monte.

Please, someone, put these people out of our misery.

Hey! Boston Herald *Was* Above All with Birdman Ad

February 25, 2015

Half a century ago the New York Daily News had a regular feature called $5 for Your Most Embarrassing Moment. And about 90% of the entries included this phrase:

“Was my face red!”

Well, call us the hardredding staff.

The other day, we posted this in the wake of the Academy Awards broadcast:


Well the hardreading staff was leafing through the Boston Herald this morning, as is our wont, when we turned page 5 to discover this:


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Double take:


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Wait – is that really an ad? And if so, why does it appear in the feisty local tabloid but not the Boston Globe? Or the New York Times? Or anywhere else, at least according to the Googletron.

It’s just kind of weird, isn’t it? Then again, maybe the Herald is Above All other papers.



Actually, not so weird, as it turns out.

From yesterday’s New York Times:


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So the flighty local tabloid was, if not Above All, at least Before All.


Today’s Ad-vantage in Boston Dailies: Birdman Herald

February 23, 2015

Well the hardreading staff was leafing through the Boston Herald this morning, as is our wont, when we turned page 5 to discover this:


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Double take:


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Wait – is that really an ad? And if so, why does it appear in the feisty local tabloid but not the Boston Globe? Or the New York Times? Or anywhere else, at least according to the Googletron.

It’s just kind of weird, isn’t it? Then again, maybe the Herald is Above All other papers.


Boston Herald’s Gelzinis Nails Lyin’ Brian Williams

February 8, 2015

At this point, it’s really Cryin’ Brian Williams, as the NBC anchor gets pummeled from all sides for fabricating a harrowing tale of danger during hisIraq war coverage in 2003. Typical of today’s coverage is this New York Times Wire Service pickup in the Boston Sunday Globe.


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Some, of course, has been tougher, like Times Op-It Girl Maureen Dowd’s piece today.

NBC executives were warned a year ago that Brian Williams was constantly inflating his biography. They were flummoxed over why the leading network anchor felt that he needed Hemingwayesque, bullets-whizzing-by flourishes to puff himself up, sometimes to the point where it was a joke in the news division.

But the caustic media big shots who once roamed the land were gone, and “there was no one around to pull his chain when he got too over-the-top,” as one NBC News reporter put it.


But for our money, the toughest – and most damning – is this piece by Peter Gelzinis in today’s Boston Herald.

Brian Williams’ snub of vets no laughing matter

Back in the fall of 2006, long before Brian Williams confessed to “conflating” his helicopter adventures over Iraq, Neal Santangelo knew the NBC news anchor was a fraud.

Santangelo, a Boston firefighter, former president of Local 718 and a proud veteran of the Navy submarine service, served on a committee that brought the Congressional Medal of Honor Society to Boston that year for its national convention.

About six months before the society’s gala banquet at the Convention Center, Williams agreed to serve as master of ceremonies.

But when he arrived on Saturday, Sept. 30, 2006, Williams told committee members Tom Lyons and Neal Santangelo that a “pressing engagement” back in New York prevented him from doing much more than greeting the audience of more than 1,000 guests … and leaving.


That pressing engagement? Parachuting into that night’s Weekend Update sketch on “Saturday Night Live.”



“I … cannot believe that you left us for this,” Neal Santangelo wrote in a letter to Williams a week after the banquet. “In an act of egotistical, blatant self-promotion, you deceived the (Medal of Honor) Recipients, declined to break bread with them and disrespected them.

“You placed comedy before courage … Your conduct was irreverent, insulting, incomprehensible and shameful. You may attempt to ‘spin’ the issue to support your position, but that will do nothing but bring you further shame in my eyes.”

The three-page letter Neal Santangelo wrote out of pure rage and emotion was never sent.


Well, thanks to Gelzinis, it’s out there now.

Boston Globe Coverage ‘Palin’ vs. Herald Sarahfest

January 26, 2015

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

Well the GOP had its first 2016 Iowa Presidential Cotillion over the weekend and say, it was . . . swill.

All the GOP kids were there (but not the adults: Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney), including Sarah Palin (R-Drunken Brawl), who got this coverage in James Pindell’s Boston Sunday Globe piece.

Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin got a standing ovation for a speech in which she referred to President Obama as “a little boy.”


Versus this play in the Sunday Boston Herald, starting with Page One.




Then the high-priced spread inside:


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Read it at your own peril. (But notice the do-me boots lower left.)

Just for scale, this New York Times piece by Ashley Parker and Trip Gabriel buried Palin in the 29th – and final – graf.

The gathering, called the Iowa Freedom Summit and held at the Hoyt Sherman Place theater, represented a return of the full political roadshow to the state. The forum drew more than 100 out-of-state journalists and a long list of Republican figures. On Friday, Sarah Palin ran into Newt Gingrich; his wife, Callista; and Mr. King in a hotel lobby, where onlookers quickly mobbed them.


Not to get technical about it, but Donald Trump got higher play than Palin in the Times. Draw your own conclusions.

Back in Boston, leave it, as often, to Herald columnist Kimberly Atkins to restore some sobriety to the tipsy local tabloid. Under the headline “Entry Trumps all silliness,” Atkins writes today that a Palin presidential campaign is only slightly less absurd than a Trump run.

[A]s absurd as a Palin candidacy sounds, at least her name has appeared on a national ballot. Not only has Trump never run a successful political campaign, his multiple corporate bankruptcy filings belie his claims of robust business acumen, which I assume would be his main presidential selling point.


Crosstown, the Globe’s Pindell has this follow-up story on the web (we couldn’t find it in our print editions). Apparently, the Palindrone won’t be stopping anytime soon.


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