Is It Time to Forgive Pete Rose? No!

July 14, 2015

As the hardreading staff has disclosed elsewhere, we did seven years in Ohio during a former life. Specifically, we were in Cincinnati from 1967-1974, and . . .

the one thing that kept us sane was this miniature Brooklyn Bridge across the Ohio River to Kentucky.


It’s known as the Singing Bridge because of the hum you hear as you drive across its metal grid roadbed. More important, it was John Roebling’s starter bridge before he (and his son and – especially – his daughter-in-law) built its lookalike in Brooklyn in the waning years of the 19th century. The Brooklyn Bridge was, at its opening in 1883, the tallest structure in the Western hemisphere and the longest span in the world: 1,600 feet from tower to tower.

(Fun fact to know and tell: On May 17, 1884, P. T. Barnum led 21 elephants over the Brooklyn Bridge to prove that it was stable. For the whole fascinating story, read The Great Bridge by David McCullough, who was once described as “the Herodotus of Hydraulics.”)


Anyway, the thing that drove us most insane during our exile in Porkopolis was The Big Red Machine, that insufferable 1970s incarnation of the Cincinnati Reds, which “a number of baseball historians [have claimed] were the second greatest team ever, after the famed 1927 Yankees.”

Nonsense. Everyone knows that was the 1961 Yankees.

Regardless, the Big Red Machinist we despised most was the reptilian Pete Rose, who’s back in the spotlight this week because the disgraced betmeister has been given a pass to tonight’s All Star game in Cincinnati by MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, who’s also said he’ll consider lifting the lifetime ban of Rose, which could make him eligible for the Hall of Fame. Support is also coming from some of the current MLB All Stars, and from Boston Globe sportswriter Nick Cafardo, who writes sympathetically about Rose in today’s edition.

Rose issue thorny

CINCINNATI — There is no debate in this neck of the woods. Pete Rose should be reinstated. Pete Rose is a Hall of Famer. Pete Rose is “Our Bad Guy.”

Despite revelations by ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” last month that Rose also bet on baseball as a player-manager in addition to the Dowd Report saying he bet as a manager, Cincinnati has forgiven him for transgressions that got him banned from baseball 26 years ago.


So, apparently, has Cafardo.

When Rose is announced Tuesday before the All-Star Game as one of the Reds’ Franchise Four (along with Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, and Barry Larkin) the ovation likely will be spine-tingling.

And one wonders whether this might be the last baseball public appearance Rose will ever make.

Isn’t it time to forgive?


No it’s not. Never will be.

Boston Globe Leaves Sox Game Early

August 4, 2014

Well the hardreading staff opened up our costly home-delivered Boston Globe this morning and here’s what we found on Page One of the Sports section:




Seriously? A thumbsucker on Clay Buchholz? All due respect to Nick Cafardo, but where the hell’s the game report?

Answer: In a later edition than the one we got this ayem.

Usually, it’s the Boston Herald that’s missing the action, but today the feisty local tabloid was on the money for a change. Back page:


Screen Shot 2014-08-04 at 1.27.22 PM


And it wasn’t just last night’s ballgame where the Globet was a day late.

From our Late to the Wedding Party desk comes this item from today’s Names column:


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Right, “as reported over the weekend” – IN THE BOSTON HERALD. ON PAGE ONE.


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New slogan for the late-ly local broadsheet: Half the News That’s Fit to Print.

Globe: Ortiz Okay; Herald: Papicock!

March 5, 2013

The jury is very much out on David Ortiz in the local dailies.

From Nick Cafardo’s piece in today’s Boston Globe:

2013-03-04T210923Z_01_FTM07_RTRMDNP_3_BASEBALLSteady progress has David Ortiz feeling upbeat

FORT MYERS, Fla. — David Ortiz feels more optimistic that he’ll be in the Opening Day lineup after running the bases Monday and feeling as if he can manage the expected soreness in his Achilles’.

“It feels good,” Ortiz said. “When I get going I’m fine. The problem is once I cool off, I start to get sore, but the doctor said it will go away. It’s just part of the treatment, part of [when you] start doing things. The injury, you got to start getting used to. That’s why we practice over and over and over and over. So you can get to that point . . . it’s a good day. I was moving pretty good. I don’t think I can run faster than that. Let’s just see how things go later on tonight.”


Not so fast there, Big Guy.

From Gerry Callahan’s column in today’s Boston Herald:

STON1530.JPGAging David Ortiz may be Sox’ Achilles’ heel

Much depends on Papi’s health

If he were playing Old Man Basketball at the Y, we’d take him across the street for a couple of beers and let him down easy. It’s not the end of the world, we’d tell him. You can still play golf. You can still walk the dog. You’re still reasonably young and healthy, and you’ve got your whole life ahead of you.

You just can’t do this anymore.


For a tiebreaker we turn to this random thought from the Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy:

The David Ortiz Achilles’ situation is especially alarming given that he sustained the injury rounding second base in front of a home run hit by Adrian Gonzalez. That’s like Tony Soprano straining his Achilles’ walking down the driveway to pick up the morning newspaper.



Hall of Fame/Hall of Shame

December 16, 2012

Interesting split decision in today’s Boston Globe sports pages over Baseball Hall of Fame balloting, which is currently underway.

Commissioner Emeritus Bob Ryan makes his position clear from the get-go.

I’m not voting for Bonds, Clemens, or Sosa


I am in possession of the toxic ballot.

It is the Hall of Fame ballot voting members of the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) have dreaded for the last five years. Our feet are finally being held to the bonfire. How will we as a body judge the candidacy of the all-time home run leader, the only man to win seven Cy Young Awards, and a man with 609 career home runs who is the only person to homer 60 times or more in three seasons?

Absent, shall we say, a complicating factor, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and Sammy Sosa would be ultra-mortal locks. Based on the numbers, there wouldn’t be the slightest hesitation in checking the box next to their names.

But what sports fan doesn’t know there is a complicating factor?


The rest of the piece has Ryan wrestling with/explaining his choices. The final score:

Summing it up: Yes to [Jeff] Bagwell, [Craig] Biggio, [Edgar] Martinez, [Jack] Morris, [Mike] Piazza, [Tim] Raines, and [Curt] Schilling. Sorry to anyone else not named Bonds, Clemens, Sosa, McGwire , and Palmeiro.


By contrast, Globe baseball scribe Nick Cafardo skipped the Hamlet stuff and just included this in his Sunday Baseball Notes column:

Roger ClemensBarry BondsSammy SosaMike PiazzaJeff BagwellCraig BiggioAlan TrammellTim Raines, and Jack Morris were all checked on my Hall of Fame ballot.


Reasoning, we hope, to come.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, meanwhile, no mention whatsoever of the Hall. It’s not like there are no BBWAA voting members at the feisty local tabloid – Steve Buckley, Jeff Horrigan, and Michael Silverman are listed on Wikipedia‘s BBWAA roster.

We’ll let you know if they let us know.



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