Globe Floods the Zone with Hernandez Coverage

June 22, 2013

Both local dailies are on the Aaron Hernandez whodunit like Brown on Williamson. The Boston Herald devotes half its front page to it:

 

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Inside are double-barreled columns from Ron Borges and Joe Fitzgerald (the latter a Never Mind to a piece Joe Fitz wrote about what a great guy Hernandez was upon his arrival at Gillette Stadium.

 

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There’s also an editorial expressing the appropriate level of outrage (and actually quotes the Boston Globe and agrees with it – stop the presses!).

Meanwhile, today’s Globe also devotes half of Page One to L’Affaire Hernandez:

 

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But it’s what’s inside that elevates the Globe coverage to obsessive levels.

Here’s how they list the reporting of the main story:

 

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They had someone down in Hernandez’s hometown of Bristol, CT talking to his high school friends, and they sent Brian MacQuarrie to Florida to report on a shooting last winter that allegedly involved Hernandez.

And the best part of the Globe’s coverage is this Page One subhede: “Hernandez is largely out of view as rumors outdistance real news.”

Can’t wait for real news to catch up.


The Tamerlan Tsarnaev Diaries (Boxing Edition)

April 21, 2013

From our Compare and Contrast in Clear Idiomatic English desk

Interesting columns in Saturday’s local dailies about Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s short-lived boxing career.

Ron Borges in the Boston Herald:

Boston Marathon SuspectsPro boxer threw punches with ‘evil’ Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2010

If Edwin Rodriguez knew back in late 2010 what he knows now, his boxing encounter in Worcester with Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev would have had a different ending, that’s for sure.

Reached yesterday afternoon, Rodriguez, the No. 2-ranked super middleweight in the world, pulled no punches when discussing his only encounter with Tsarnaev.

“I wasn’t trying to kill him; we were just sparring,” Rodriguez said, “but I would have if I knew he was that evil and a coward.”

 

Money quote:

“It told you everything that he showed up at my gym with nobody,” Rodriguez said. “I’ve never been to a gym by myself. When you go to someone else’s gym, you always want someone to have your back.”

 

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, columnist Kevin Cullen filed this:

22045677Nothing tough about this boxer’s character

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was a pretty good boxer, and he fashioned himself a tough guy. He was so tough he was charged with assaulting his girlfriend.

Last Monday, tough guy Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his brother left bombs on the sidewalk on Boylston Street and killed an 8-year-old boy, a 29-year-old woman who grew up in Medford, and a 23-year-old Chinese graduate student at Boston University.

 

Money quote:

It takes a tough guy to pack a bomb with ball bearings and nails and purposely put it in a crowd so that it will kill and maim men, women, and children. The Tsarnaevs were so tough that when they decided to kill a fine police officer named Sean Collier on Thursday night, they approached him from behind and shot Collier in the head even before Collier could get out of his cruiser.

 

Boston journalists are fighting mad about the Marathon mayhem, no doubt about it.


Gronkocalypse 3!! (Globe Rips Off Herald Division)

April 8, 2013

From our Gronkmageddon desk

Sunday’s Boston Herald plays its New England Patriots scoop Gronk-and-center in the Sports section:

 

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The Ron Borges/Karen Guregian report:

STON2744.JPGAnother Rob Gronkowski setback

Sources say readiness for year in peril

Wes Welker may not be the only important pass catcher Tom Brady is missing when the Patriots season begins in September. His biggest one may be absent as well.

According to multiple sources familiar with the situation, tight end Rob Gronkowski has been battling a stubborn infection in the area around where a second metal plate was installed to repair his broken left forearm and his readiness for the season is in jeopardy.

 

Crosstown rival Sunday Boston Globe had, well, nothing on the Gronkbeat in its print edition.

But our stately local broadsheet did post this on its website at 11:33 on Sunday morning:

Texans Patriots Football.JPEG-0884e-4033Gronkowski has infection and could need more surgery

Rob Gronkowski’s left arm continues to be a concern for the Patriots and their standout tight end.

The infection that led to Gronkowski undergoing a third surgery on the forearm has lingered, and according to league sources, he could be facing a fourth surgery if it does not clear up in the coming weeks.

If the infection continues, doctors could decide to remove the second plate he had placed in his arm because that could be the cause of the infection — but it is unknown at this point exactly what is causing the infection, one of the sources said.

Things could be further complicated if it is discovered that the infection has spread to other parts of the arm.

 

One thing that didn’t spread: Credit to the Herald for breaking the story.

Poor form, Globeniks. Poor form.


Gronkpocalypse 2! (Formerly Gronkmageddon 2!)

November 20, 2012

The Boston Herald is a bit bipolar in its Gronkoverage of the Patriots tight end, who broke his arm on a meaningless play in Sunday’s rout of the Indianapolis Colts.

(Front page: THE GRONK CRISIS. Back page: GOTTA MOVE ON.)

But the feisty local tabloid is absolutely sure that the Gronkastrophe deserves four full pages in today’s edition.

Start with this Duh! headline in the news section:

Doctors: Best play is to let it fully heal

Despite the public clamor and Rob Gronkowski’s obvious determination to return as soon as he can from a broken forearm, the general consensus from medical professionals is that the 23-year-old All-Pro tight end should err on the side of caution — even if it means missing the start of the playoffs.

Dr. David Forsh, chief of orthopedic trauma at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, said that Gronkowski could potentially be sidelined up to eight weeks. Even when the tight end gets his cast off, he could be delayed with more rehabilitation to get his range of motion and strength back.

“The concern with these fractures is not how soon they heal, which is normally about 6-8 weeks, but when he’d be able to return to play,” Forsh said. “It really depends on how he does with his rehab and how quickly he heals it.”

The print edition has a swell illustration with all kinds of medical claptrap to obsess over.

Then there’s this piece on the facing page:

Patriots must break the mold in life minus Gronkowski

All-Pro tight end’s absence won’t be filled by just one player

FOXBORO — Sunday afternoon, Rob Gronkowski ran over, around and past hapless Colts players, debilitating Indy with his full arsenal of skill, brawn and athleticism.

Today, those are mere highlights to a Patriots [team stats] team and fan base that now must bear life without their All-World tight end.

Gronkowski had successful surgery yesterday morning and had a metal plate inserted into his broken left forearm. He told people Sunday night that he would miss 4-6 weeks, according to sources, and a separate source said he would miss “a few weeks” after yesterday’s procedure. Unless there’s a drastic change, those sources all believe he’ll be back for the playoffs.

Then it’s on to the sports section for two more pages of coverage, starting with this Ron Borges column:

No ‘extra’ work needed

Silly to play Gronkowski on special teams

FOXBORO – The argument that Rob Gronkowski should not have been on the field when he broke his forearm blocking for an extra point because his team was leading by 34 points Sunday is a specious one.

The argument that he should not be blocking for extra points and field goals at any time is not.

And then finish it all off with this Gerry Callahan piece:

No Gronk? Next man up

While fans gnash teeth, Pats shrug off injury and move on

The news broke one hour and 43 minutes after the forearm did. From the parking lots to the private boxes, from barrooms to living rooms, Patriots [team stats] fans were in a panic.

Did you hear? Gronk was down. Gronk was out.

The news was bad, real bad: Gronk broke.

Just like the hardreading staff’s patience with this story.

Regardless, we dutifully trundled crosstown to the Boston Globe to see if they’d developed more of a sense of urgency than they exhibited yesterday.

And indeed they had:

Can we go now?

 


The Boston Globe’s Ryder Cup-Out

October 2, 2012

Here’s how Monday’s Boston Globe reported the throat-grabbing collapse of America’s Ryder Cup team on Sunday, after it had built a supposedly insurmountable 8 1/2 – 3 1/2 lead over the European squad.

Europe turns tables on US

It rallies, avenges galling 1999 loss

MEDINAH, Ill. — Move over, Brookline, and make room for Medinah. There’s a new location that forever will be locked in Ryder Cup lore.

Turning the tables on a day from 13 years ago that still stings, Europe staged the greatest comeback — or benefited from the biggest collapse, depending on your perspective — in Ryder Cup history, pulling off a victory just as improbable as the one grabbed by the United States at The Country Club in 1999.

Just as emotional, too, at least to the Europeans, who sang and danced and hugged and sprayed champagne over their fans from a bridge near the clubhouse when it was over. Keeping former Ryder Cup icon Seve Ballesteros close to their hearts all week — and wearing his image on their sleeves Sunday — the Euros would have made the late Spaniard proud, somehow finding a way to win when the situation 24 hours earlier seemed hopelessly lost.

The Globe even provides this helpful graphic:

But it was the Boston Herald that cut to the chase on its back page:

 

 

Yeah, that’s more like it.

Only one question left:

How’s that Monday morning hangover, Herald columnist Ron Borges? Borges wrote this in Sunday’s edition:

No shot, Europe

U.S. lead too daunting

MEDINAH, Ill. — For the European team to win the 39th Ryder Cup competition today it won’t take a comeback. It will take a resurrection.

The Euros find themselves buried in a deeper hole this morning than the Greek economy. They don’t need a bailout plan. They need a concession speech.

Actually, Ron, you need a concession speech.

Not to get technical about it.

 


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