Boch to the Future on Minimum Wage

March 5, 2014

Ernie Boch Jr. is one smart guy.

First he takes the old man’s car kingdom and turns it into a dynasty. He has his own band, his own charitable foundation, and throws Bochanalias at his mansion in Norwood that wind up in the Wall Street Journal.

And today he ran this ad in the Boston Globe.

 

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And the stately local broadsheet returned the favor with this piece posted to its (New! Metered!!) website about 20 minutes ago.

Car dealer Ernie Boch Jr. will raise hourly wages

Hikes minimum rate for his employees; announces decision as Obama visits area

Car dealer Ernie Boch Jr. had a message for President Obama to read when he arrived in Boston on Wednesday. Boch isn’t waiting for the government to boch-bigraise the minimum wage.

“President Obama: I did it!” he wrote in a signed, full-page ad that appeared in Wednesday’s Boston Globe. Boch, a Republican who has supported political candidates from both parties, said he will raise the pay of his minimum wage workers to $10.10 on April 1.

“I believe that, even above minimum wage, it’s extremely difficult to make a living, especially with a family and expenses,” Boch said in an interview Tuesday. “I’m doing what I think is the right thing, which is what Obama is proposing. I’m doing my part.”

 

Boch’s also doing his part to keep this a Two-Daily Town: He ran the same ad in the Boston Herald.

 

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Actually, not exactly the same ad. Notice the “Advertisement . . . Advertisement . . . Advertisement” at the top of the Herald ad?

Not there in the Globe version.

Who’da thunk the feisty local tabloid would ever be more transparent than the Globe?

Will wonders never cease.

 


Globe Fails to Deliver Delivery-Fail Story

December 26, 2013

From our One Town, Two Places desk

Once again the local dailies live in parallel universes.

Today’s Boston Herald front page:

 

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The inside story:

A Christmas delivery meltdown that saw retailers and shippers failing to del­iver gifts on time for the holiday could spur an upheaval — and even a backlash — in online shopping, experts said yesterday, as consumers took to social media to vent their spleen.A UPS delivery man prepares to deliver packages on Christmas Eve in New York

“I think too much was promised because the 
industry and the carriers
 underestimated how much demand there will be for
that last-minute type of delivery. I don’t think there’s any doubt that a lot of consumers and stores alike were really besieged at the last moment,” said Jon Hurst, president of the 
Retailers Association of Massachusetts.

 

Reaction by Herald commenters was decidedly mixed.

 

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Inevitably, the feisty local tabloiders wound up turning on each other:

 

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Crosstown at the Boston Globe, the story was . . . lost in transit.

Today’s stately local broadsheet has nothing on the carriers putting the X in Xmas, but it did have this helpful primer on returning gifts.

The garish sweater from your aunt. The Chia Pet from your brother-in-law. The PlayStation game from a grandmother who forgot you have an Xbox. Getting rid of unwanted gifts is as much a holiday tradition as receiving them.AP103518433181

About one-third of consumers returned at least one gift last year, according to the National Retail Federation, and many still do it the old-fashioned way: at a store’s customer service counter.

But before you get in line, take some basic steps to make it less aggravating.

Most crucially, if you received a receipt with your gift, keep it until you are sure you won’t be returning the item, said Edgar Dworsky, the Somerville-based founder of the consumer advocacy and education site ConsumerWorld.com.

 

Really? A lot of people include a receipt with their Christmas presents? The hard gifting staff had no idea.

One last thing: This time, at least, the Herald had the better nose for news. The Wall Street Journal had the carrier meltdown on its front page today, and the New York Times ran it on D1 of the Business section.

Season’s Beatings in the daily bakeoff, eh?


Knee-Slapper o’ the Day (WSJ Herald Hunter Edition)

October 22, 2013

Well the hardreading staff unfolded the Wall Street Journal the other day and here’s what fell out.

 

IMG_2449

 

(Photo courtesy of: The Missus.)

Okay, so we’re gonna open the envelope now.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER

By Invitation Only

You are among the select few entitled to receive your first 12 weeks of the Wall Street Journal – in both print and digital form – for only $1 a week.

 

Uh-huh – Herald readers will take the Journal (forget about one dollar a week – try $700 a year) right around the time Barack Obama double-dates with Ted Cruz.

File under: The WSJ should just set its money on fire.


Al Jazeera America Has Bad News for the Boston Herald

August 20, 2013

The hardreading staff gets four newspapers delivered to the Global Worldwide Headquarters every day: Boston Globe, Boston Herald, New York Times, Wall Street Journal.

Guess which one didn’t have an ad promoting today’s launch of Al Jazeera America, the Qatar-based news organization that recently bought Al Gore’s ghostship channel, Current TV?

That’s right. The Herald.

Today’s Globe featured this ad on the back page of the A section:

 

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The Journal ran the same ad, except with different colors.

The Times, meanwhile, had two Al Jazeera America ads. This full-page ad in the A section:

 

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And this smaller one in the Business section.

 

Picture 5

 

The Herald got bubkes.

Of course, this happens to the feisty local tabloid all the time, as the hardreading staff has previously noted. Then again, it’s just possible that the paper rejected an effort by AJAM to purchase ad space. Maybe one of the hardhating Heraldniks who reads this will let us know.

Regardless, it’s one thing for Al Jazeera America to buy ads, and quite another to sell them. From TVNewser:

One of the complicating factors with regard to [today’s] launch: it is not clear whether AJAM will have much advertiser support.

The channel’s executive team touted its light commercial load leading up the launch arguing that it was a differentiator, but also declined to say who the flagship launch advertiser would be.

 

That, and cable carriage, will likely determine the fate of AJAM. But not in the near future: They’ve got some pretty deep pockets in Qatar, however you pronounce it.


The ‘Ray Donovan’ Rumpus? It Ends Tonight!

July 2, 2013

As the hardworking staff at Campaign Outsider noted earlier, the Times-Industrial Complex rendered a split decision on Showtime’s new series Ray Donovan. New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley found it “grandiose, predictable and painfully slow,” while kissin’ cousin Boston Globe critic Matthew Gilbert considered it “fantastic.”

So the hardworking staff went to a tiebreaker: Wall Street Journal critic Dorothy Rabinowitz, who called it a “hard-bitten and buoyant tale.”

But then came Boston Herald critic Mark Perigard, who hated it.

 

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So we needed another tiebreaker.

Which was me and the Missus.

Our verdict:

Meh.

The Missus wants to stipulate that we love Liev Schreiber, but the rest of the cast does a lot of scenery-chewing, and Jon Voight has had so much cosmetic surgery, it now qualifies as a head transplant.

Regardless, we’ll give it one more chance.


Boston Globe Herald Hostage, Day 4

February 24, 2013

The Schadenfreude Gazette is so desperate for new ways every day to bash the Globe over its impending sale, the feisty local tabloid is willfully ignoring reality just to get in some cheap shots. Today’s case in point (no idea why the “1” is upper right, but couldn’t get rid of it):

Picture 1

 

Let’s skip over Howie Carr’s bulk-mail offering (“I have next to nothing in common with the pampered pukes of Morrissey Boulevard — I went to a state college, I’m not in the Social Register, I don’t have a trust fund, I wasn’t born and raised on Park Avenue, I never summered in the Hamptons” blah blah blah) and go right to the alleged news report.

121611globemh01.1Murdoch, Times have mutual interest in bid

Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, reported to be on The New York Times Co.’s shortlist of suitors for its Boston Globe, would be a bargain hunter looking to get the Hub newspaper on the cheap from his archrival at the Times, who in turn could use the News Corp. chairman’s bid to drive up the price of other offers, according to media analysts.

“The perception is that Rupert is the leading buyer of newspapers in the country if not, I suppose, the world. So obviously … if you are selling a newspaper, you certainly want him in the action,” said Vanity Fair contributing editor Michael Wolff, author of “The Man Who Owns the News: Inside the Secret World of Rupert Murdoch.”

 

This is just refried slop from yesterday’s edition, complete with quotes from the reptilian Michael Wolff. It also recycles this piece from the Wall Street Journal:

The Wall Street Journal, which Murdoch’s company bought from the Bancroft family for $5 billion in 2007, cited sources in reporting Friday that the Times Co. is “hoping to draw a bid” from Murdoch — even as the Times has been in talks with another potential buyer who submitted a 
$100 million bid last month.

 

Problem is, they forgot to crib the most important part:

News Corp.’s ownership of a television station in Boston would rule out purchase of the Globe, given regulatory rules that prohibit companies owning a newspaper and a TV station in the same market, said a person familiar with the situation.

 

But hey – why let facts get in the way of a good poke in the competition’s eye, eh?


Boston Globe Herald Hostage, Day Three (Volume 2)

February 23, 2013

The print edition of The Schadenfreude Gazette has arrived at the Global Worldwide Headquarters of Two-Daily Town, so here’s a better look at today’s offerings:

Picture 1

 

The hardreading staff previously noted the feature story. A taste of the others:

As it went down on Twitter …

Globe reporter Mark Shanahan — @MarkAShanahan — tweeted yesterday’s town hall gathering, where New York Times. Co. vice chairman Mark Golden discussed plans to sell the broadsheet with Globe employees. Here is Shanahan’s report:

‘Sorry for the way this unfolded. It was not our intention,’ says @nytimes about being scooped on its plan to sell @bostonglobe . . .

 

And:

Herald’s commenters plot future for broadsheet

With a for-sale sign planted outside the Boston Globe, would-be media moguls of every stripe were set free this week to sketch their plans for a bold entry into the New England media landscape.

All they needed was $100 million, give or take.

“I would buy the Globe in a heartbeat if I had the money,” said George during yesterday’s Friday Throwdown news chat. “And I would take the editorial page from far left to common-sense middle of the road.” . . .

 

And – THIS JUST IN from the feisty local tabloid’s website (picked up from the Wall Street Journal):

STON7943.JPGReport: Times gets $100M Globe bid, wants Murdoch deal

The New York Times Co. is pushing for a deal for the Boston Globe with media mogul Rupert Murdoch, but has also received a bid for the beleaguered broadsheet for more than $100 million, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The bid came from Rick Daniels, a former Gatehouse Media New England president and ex-Globe executive, and private equity firm Boston Post Partners, represented by managing director Heberden Ryan, the Journal said. The Herald first reported that Boston Post Partners has long been a key player in the sale of the Globe.

 

Of course, current FCC regulations prohibit cross-ownership of a TV station and newspaper in the same market, and it’s unlikely Murdoch would trade Fox 25 for the Globe.

Meanwhile, crosstown at the stately local broadsheet, there’s this in today’s print edition, back on Metro B5:

Michael Golden_1Globe staff briefed on plans to sell paper

Executive vows responsible handover

New York Times Co. vice chairman Michael Golden told Boston Globe employees Friday that the company has a duty to seek the highest bidder in a sale but aims to leave the newspaper in responsible hands.

“We have no intention to send the New England Media Group to the slaughterhouse,” he said in one of three town-hall style meetings with employees.

Golden came to Boston to discuss the Times Co.’s plan to sell the Globe, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, and their related websites. In the meetings, he made no promises about what kind of suitors the Times Co. would consider.

 

When asked by the staff whether the Times Co. has a duty to find “a good steward of New England’s largest newspaper,” he replied “we will take what we consider to be the best bid.”

Uh-oh.


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