Ernie Boch Jr. Is Sort of Boston’s Car Zareh

May 3, 2015

Well the hardreading staff was perusing the Boston Herald the other day when we stumbled upon this ad from Mr. Upward (Auto)Mobility Ernie Boch Jr.

 

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That auto-promotion (a regular feature in the Bochy local tabloid) reminded us of the late, great Zareh Thomajan, the self-styled Thief of State Street.

Backstory from The 100 Greatest Advertisements 1852-1958: Who Wrote Them and What They Did, by Julian Watkins.

 

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Zareh Thomajan’s legendary series of ads like this one ran in Boston newspapers for almost three decades.

 

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In 1960 Zareh’s son Greg took over the family business and maintained the Zareh tradition with ads like this:

 

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Greg Thomajan published his series of ads in The Son of the Thief of State Street.

One of his last:

 

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Zareh Thomajan, we imagine, rests well too.

Meanwhile, memo to Ernie Boch Jr.:

Step up your game, son. And maybe, instead of chronicling other fabulously wealthy guys, write about the car-selling business in the same humanizing way Zareh (and Greg) wrote about the rag business.

Just a suggestion.


Boston 2024 Is Now Officially Circling the Drain

April 4, 2015

From our Late to the Going-Away Party desk

Good Friday turned out to be Bad Friday for Store 2024.

As in, all news was bad news for the local machers mucking up the bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Start with yesterday’s Boston Globe (which has generally taken pity on the totally inept Boston 2024niks), where two – count ’em, two – columnists wrote MISTIA (More in Sorrow Than in Anger) pieces about the botched bid.

First, Shirley Leung on the Business front page:

Olympics bid needs a world-class PR save

In all the hand-wringing over the mess that is Boston’s Olympics bid, Doug Rubin has managed to escape scrutiny.

Until now.unnamed(42)

Boston 2024 is awash in problems — and none bigger is the group’s ability to get its message across that the Games can make Boston a better version of itself. The Olympics are supposed to be a feel-good event, but not here. Instead, the Games are toxic, as if organizers are proposing to build a nuclear waste dump on the Greenway.

There’s plenty of blame to go around, from Boston 2024 chairman John Fish to our naysaying selves. But Rubin and his firm Northwind Strategies are most responsible for making sure the public understands why hosting the Summer Games could be good for Boston.

 

Which the public assuredly does not.

Next, Scot Lehigh on the Globe’s op-ed page:

Taxpayer risk is Boston 2024’s highest hurdle

WHEN IT comes to hosting the Olympics here in 2024, I’m a skeptic. But now that everyone agrees that voters will get to decide the fate of the Olympics bid, I’m a skeptic in a wait-and-see mode.

The threshold question that Boston 2024 faces is crystal clear. Well before the public vote, the group will need to present a convincing plan showing how Boston (or Greater Boston) can host the 2024 Summer Games without putting taxpayers at risk.

So far, what we have are professions of good intentions. “Tax dollars will not be used to build venues or pay for the operation of the Games,” Boston 2024’s new briefing book asserts.

The reality, however, is that at some point, Boston will have to guarantee that the various Olympic venues will be ready. And that means the city could have to step to the plate if plans go seriously awry. Given the deep opposition to using public dollars for the Games, it’s difficult to see how Mayor Marty Walsh could put Boston in that position without an air-tight assurance that taxpayers won’t be left holding the bag.

 

Ah, yes, Marty Walsh.

Crosstown at the Marty Walsh Gazette (a.k.a. the Boston Herald), the marty local tabloid – which had been a sort of house organ for City Hall until being thrown under the buss on Thursday – was silent yesterday on all matters Olympic.

Which brings us to Friday’s New York Times drive-by hooting.

U.S.O.C. Misjudged Appetite for a Hot Potato

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After completing its long, complicated and anything but transparent process of choosing a city as its candidate to host the 2024 Summer Games, the United States Olympic Committee has found itself in an awkward position.

Boston, the city the committee chose to represent the United States, does not appear to want to host the Games at all.

Too expensive, some Bostonians say — the money used to host the Games should be dedicated to improving schools and social programs. Too many people, others say — Boston has terrible traffic, so why invite thousands more to further clog the streets?

Too unnecessary, say those personally hurt by the notion that the Olympics could improve Boston’s image worldwide: Why does Boston need the Olympics to validate it as a world-class city when Bostonians are perfectly happy with Boston as it is?

 

Except they’re not. Never really have been.

But Bostonians are even less happy with the Olympics. Then again, that’s just one of many problems with the town’s bid. And so, according to the Times, the endgame is near, in the form of the 2016 statewide referendum Boston 2024 has promised.

If recent history is any guide, that public vote will deal the fatal blow to Boston’s chances. Voters in Munich; St. Moritz/Davos, Switzerland; and Krakow, Poland, all batted away their bids for the 2022 Winter Games. Vienna retreated from its 2028 Summer Games bid after a vote, too.

 

Everyone under the sun has denied this week’s Wall Street Journal report that “the U.S. Olympic Committee may drop Boston’s bid to host the 2024 Summer Games if local support doesn’t improve soon.”

But now comes today’s Boston Herald, which has apparently found a new go-to guy. “Boston 2024 should ‘clean house’ and install a ‘better team’ that can keep a shorter leash on Chairman John Fish and prevent more embarrassing gaffes — like questioning the patriotism of Olympic critics, U.S. Rep. Stephen F. Lynch told the Herald yesterday.”

Oh, right – we had forgotten that one: Bostonians are unpatriotic if they don’t support this game of five-ring monte.

Please, someone, put these people out of our misery.


Boston Herald’s Cohen Crazy Re: Climate Change

January 17, 2015

Only in the ditzy local tabloid could a character like Adriana Cohen have a regular column. But we’ll get back to that in a minute.

First, Page One of the New York Times:

 

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Then, Page One of the Boston Globe:

 

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Just for good measure, Wall Street Journal piece by Robert Lee Hotz (you can’t make this stuff up).

Now, back to Ms. Cohen’s piece today.

Glut of climate misinformation chilling

Is a thermometer a climate denier?

It must be because according to global-warming alarmists, the Earth is heating up, which will undoubtedly cause environmental “Armageddon.”

They demand our government (aka taxpayers) spend billions fighting climate change all while politicians pass job-killing regulations in the process.

 

And what’s her evidence? “My car thermometer registered negative 3 degrees last week! Pipes burst in homes and heating bills soared as the dreaded ‘polar vortex’ swooped down from the Arctic.”

Really. There’s ill-informed, and then there’s resolutely ignorant.

You pick.


New Balance Balances Local Dailies in ‘Heroes’ Ad

December 30, 2014

From our Late to the Parity desk

Local shoemaker New Balance yesterday saluted “each and every police officer, firefighter, first responder and service man & woman” in this full-page ad that ran in both – say it again, both – Boston dailies.

 

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Truth to tell, the ad also ran in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

But as the Heraldnix might say, why get technical about it.


Boch to the Future on Minimum Wage

March 5, 2014

Ernie Boch Jr. is one smart guy.

First he takes the old man’s car kingdom and turns it into a dynasty. He has his own band, his own charitable foundation, and throws Bochanalias at his mansion in Norwood that wind up in the Wall Street Journal.

And today he ran this ad in the Boston Globe.

 

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And the stately local broadsheet returned the favor with this piece posted to its (New! Metered!!) website about 20 minutes ago.

Car dealer Ernie Boch Jr. will raise hourly wages

Hikes minimum rate for his employees; announces decision as Obama visits area

Car dealer Ernie Boch Jr. had a message for President Obama to read when he arrived in Boston on Wednesday. Boch isn’t waiting for the government to boch-bigraise the minimum wage.

“President Obama: I did it!” he wrote in a signed, full-page ad that appeared in Wednesday’s Boston Globe. Boch, a Republican who has supported political candidates from both parties, said he will raise the pay of his minimum wage workers to $10.10 on April 1.

“I believe that, even above minimum wage, it’s extremely difficult to make a living, especially with a family and expenses,” Boch said in an interview Tuesday. “I’m doing what I think is the right thing, which is what Obama is proposing. I’m doing my part.”

 

Boch’s also doing his part to keep this a Two-Daily Town: He ran the same ad in the Boston Herald.

 

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Actually, not exactly the same ad. Notice the “Advertisement . . . Advertisement . . . Advertisement” at the top of the Herald ad?

Not there in the Globe version.

Who’da thunk the feisty local tabloid would ever be more transparent than the Globe?

Will wonders never cease.

 


Globe Fails to Deliver Delivery-Fail Story

December 26, 2013

From our One Town, Two Places desk

Once again the local dailies live in parallel universes.

Today’s Boston Herald front page:

 

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The inside story:

A Christmas delivery meltdown that saw retailers and shippers failing to del­iver gifts on time for the holiday could spur an upheaval — and even a backlash — in online shopping, experts said yesterday, as consumers took to social media to vent their spleen.A UPS delivery man prepares to deliver packages on Christmas Eve in New York

“I think too much was promised because the 
industry and the carriers
 underestimated how much demand there will be for
that last-minute type of delivery. I don’t think there’s any doubt that a lot of consumers and stores alike were really besieged at the last moment,” said Jon Hurst, president of the 
Retailers Association of Massachusetts.

 

Reaction by Herald commenters was decidedly mixed.

 

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Inevitably, the feisty local tabloiders wound up turning on each other:

 

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Crosstown at the Boston Globe, the story was . . . lost in transit.

Today’s stately local broadsheet has nothing on the carriers putting the X in Xmas, but it did have this helpful primer on returning gifts.

The garish sweater from your aunt. The Chia Pet from your brother-in-law. The PlayStation game from a grandmother who forgot you have an Xbox. Getting rid of unwanted gifts is as much a holiday tradition as receiving them.AP103518433181

About one-third of consumers returned at least one gift last year, according to the National Retail Federation, and many still do it the old-fashioned way: at a store’s customer service counter.

But before you get in line, take some basic steps to make it less aggravating.

Most crucially, if you received a receipt with your gift, keep it until you are sure you won’t be returning the item, said Edgar Dworsky, the Somerville-based founder of the consumer advocacy and education site ConsumerWorld.com.

 

Really? A lot of people include a receipt with their Christmas presents? The hard gifting staff had no idea.

One last thing: This time, at least, the Herald had the better nose for news. The Wall Street Journal had the carrier meltdown on its front page today, and the New York Times ran it on D1 of the Business section.

Season’s Beatings in the daily bakeoff, eh?


Knee-Slapper o’ the Day (WSJ Herald Hunter Edition)

October 22, 2013

Well the hardreading staff unfolded the Wall Street Journal the other day and here’s what fell out.

 

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(Photo courtesy of: The Missus.)

Okay, so we’re gonna open the envelope now.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER

By Invitation Only

You are among the select few entitled to receive your first 12 weeks of the Wall Street Journal – in both print and digital form – for only $1 a week.

 

Uh-huh – Herald readers will take the Journal (forget about one dollar a week – try $700 a year) right around the time Barack Obama double-dates with Ted Cruz.

File under: The WSJ should just set its money on fire.


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