New Boston Globe Saturday Design Is WSJr

October 3, 2015

The Boston Globe unveiled a new look this morning, one that appears very much like a knockoff of the Weekend Wall Street Journal. (Sorry, no WSJ e-paper, so you’ll have to spring for one yourself, or – god forbid – take our word for it.)

Brave New Globe, Page One:


Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 2.08.09 PM


The paper we received had more of a gray banner, but then again the whole page was kind of washed out compared to the e-paper. Regardless, we were happy to see this helpful note from Globe Editor Brian McGrory:


Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 2.09.13 PM


Okay . . .

So Metro, Nation, World, Business, and Opinion are all smushed together in the A section, which has a bouncier feel than the weekday paper.

The new Good Life section is pure Wall Street Journalism.


Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 2.21.26 PM


The hardreading staff tries never to pass judgment on first impressions.

But you’re certainly welcome to.

Boston Herald Wants No More-a Healey on DraftKings

September 18, 2015

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey is living in a fantasy world.

She’s hot on the heels of the hot sports “contest” website DraftKings, which has spent $81 million on TV spots in the past six weeks, according to the Wall Street Journal. But that’s not keeping Healey from nickel-and-diming the DraftKingpins. She’s investigating whether the so-called fantasy sports site is actually a betting scheme in sheep’s clothing. And, as per usual, the Boston dailies see her quest quite differently.

The Boston Globe plays it straight with a C1 piece below the fold.


Screen Shot 2015-09-18 at 12.13.36 PM


Crosstown at the Boston Herald, the story gets the expensive two-page spread.


Screen Shot 2015-09-18 at 12.10.10 PM


The punting local tabloid looks at the AG’s overreach from the fantasy fan’s point of view Owen Boss’s report, the legal perspective in Bob McGovern’s column,  and a John Sapochetti piece representing the umbrage-industrial complex.

And we’re betting we haven’t heard the last of this from the Heraldniks either.

Boston Heraldsteria! (Prez Ad Spend Edition)

September 1, 2015

First in what we expect will be an endless series

The chronically overcaffeinated Boston Herald jumped on the 2016 presidential campaign ad bandwagon yesterday with this Herald Special Report by Erin Smith and Jack Encarnacao.

Campaign ads will have Mass. appeal

$18M in local spots already booked for 2016

Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 12.53.46 AM

Presidential candidates and super PACs have already booked more than $18 million worth of ad time on local television through next year — just the start of a more than $300 million presidential bonanza for area TV stations.

With ad buys variously targeting women, men and both older and younger demographics, the campaigns and PACs could make 2016 the most moneyed campaign season ever. But it could also be the last big presidential election of the TV age, before the Internet starts cutting deeply into broadcast ad revenues.


First of all, 2016 will not be the last big presidential election of the TV age. Internet ads can mobilize, but nothing amplifies the way television spots do.

Second of all, this part of the Herald piece is pure fantasy:

“There’s so much money that’s going to be spent on television advertising that they will run out of spots,” said Kip Cassino of Borrell Associates, a media research company. “There is going to be more political spending — from last Fourth of July until Election Day 2016 — then [sic] has ever been spent in the history of the nation. It’s going to be more than $16 billion.”


$16 billion? Seriously?

Let’s consult a more sober-minded source, shall we?

From yesterday’s Wall Street Journal piece by Patrick O’Connor:

Kantar Media, which tracks TV advertising, predicts overall spending for the 2016 elections will be about $4.4 billion, up roughly 16% from the $3.8 billion candidates and outside groups laid out for cable and broadcast ads in 2012. “TV remains the best way to reach passive voters who are not necessarily looking for information,” said Elizabeth Wilner, who oversees Kantar’s Campaign Media Analysis Group.


Interestingly, this WSJ graphic directly contradicts the Herald claims by Borrell Associates’ Kip Cassino.




Notice the source of the graphic?

Borrell Associates!

Go figure.

Ernie Boch Jr. Is Sort of Boston’s Car Zareh

May 3, 2015

Well the hardreading staff was perusing the Boston Herald the other day when we stumbled upon this ad from Mr. Upward (Auto)Mobility Ernie Boch Jr.


Screen Shot 2015-05-03 at 1.03.47 AM


That auto-promotion (a regular feature in the Bochy local tabloid) reminded us of the late, great Zareh Thomajan, the self-styled Thief of State Street.

Backstory from The 100 Greatest Advertisements 1852-1958: Who Wrote Them and What They Did, by Julian Watkins.


Screen Shot 2015-05-03 at 2.00.09 AMScreen Shot 2015-05-03 at 2.00.57 AM


Zareh Thomajan’s legendary series of ads like this one ran in Boston newspapers for almost three decades.


Screen Shot 2015-05-03 at 1.19.44 AM


In 1960 Zareh’s son Greg took over the family business and maintained the Zareh tradition with ads like this:


Screen Shot 2015-05-02 at 12.34.45 PM


Greg Thomajan published his series of ads in The Son of the Thief of State Street.

One of his last:




Zareh Thomajan, we imagine, rests well too.

Meanwhile, memo to Ernie Boch Jr.:

Step up your game, son. And maybe, instead of chronicling other fabulously wealthy guys, write about the car-selling business in the same humanizing way Zareh (and Greg) wrote about the rag business.

Just a suggestion.

Boston 2024 Is Now Officially Circling the Drain

April 4, 2015

From our Late to the Going-Away Party desk

Good Friday turned out to be Bad Friday for Store 2024.

As in, all news was bad news for the local machers mucking up the bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Start with yesterday’s Boston Globe (which has generally taken pity on the totally inept Boston 2024niks), where two – count ’em, two – columnists wrote MISTIA (More in Sorrow Than in Anger) pieces about the botched bid.

First, Shirley Leung on the Business front page:

Olympics bid needs a world-class PR save

In all the hand-wringing over the mess that is Boston’s Olympics bid, Doug Rubin has managed to escape scrutiny.

Until now.unnamed(42)

Boston 2024 is awash in problems — and none bigger is the group’s ability to get its message across that the Games can make Boston a better version of itself. The Olympics are supposed to be a feel-good event, but not here. Instead, the Games are toxic, as if organizers are proposing to build a nuclear waste dump on the Greenway.

There’s plenty of blame to go around, from Boston 2024 chairman John Fish to our naysaying selves. But Rubin and his firm Northwind Strategies are most responsible for making sure the public understands why hosting the Summer Games could be good for Boston.


Which the public assuredly does not.

Next, Scot Lehigh on the Globe’s op-ed page:

Taxpayer risk is Boston 2024’s highest hurdle

WHEN IT comes to hosting the Olympics here in 2024, I’m a skeptic. But now that everyone agrees that voters will get to decide the fate of the Olympics bid, I’m a skeptic in a wait-and-see mode.

The threshold question that Boston 2024 faces is crystal clear. Well before the public vote, the group will need to present a convincing plan showing how Boston (or Greater Boston) can host the 2024 Summer Games without putting taxpayers at risk.

So far, what we have are professions of good intentions. “Tax dollars will not be used to build venues or pay for the operation of the Games,” Boston 2024’s new briefing book asserts.

The reality, however, is that at some point, Boston will have to guarantee that the various Olympic venues will be ready. And that means the city could have to step to the plate if plans go seriously awry. Given the deep opposition to using public dollars for the Games, it’s difficult to see how Mayor Marty Walsh could put Boston in that position without an air-tight assurance that taxpayers won’t be left holding the bag.


Ah, yes, Marty Walsh.

Crosstown at the Marty Walsh Gazette (a.k.a. the Boston Herald), the marty local tabloid – which had been a sort of house organ for City Hall until being thrown under the buss on Thursday – was silent yesterday on all matters Olympic.

Which brings us to Friday’s New York Times drive-by hooting.

U.S.O.C. Misjudged Appetite for a Hot Potato


After completing its long, complicated and anything but transparent process of choosing a city as its candidate to host the 2024 Summer Games, the United States Olympic Committee has found itself in an awkward position.

Boston, the city the committee chose to represent the United States, does not appear to want to host the Games at all.

Too expensive, some Bostonians say — the money used to host the Games should be dedicated to improving schools and social programs. Too many people, others say — Boston has terrible traffic, so why invite thousands more to further clog the streets?

Too unnecessary, say those personally hurt by the notion that the Olympics could improve Boston’s image worldwide: Why does Boston need the Olympics to validate it as a world-class city when Bostonians are perfectly happy with Boston as it is?


Except they’re not. Never really have been.

But Bostonians are even less happy with the Olympics. Then again, that’s just one of many problems with the town’s bid. And so, according to the Times, the endgame is near, in the form of the 2016 statewide referendum Boston 2024 has promised.

If recent history is any guide, that public vote will deal the fatal blow to Boston’s chances. Voters in Munich; St. Moritz/Davos, Switzerland; and Krakow, Poland, all batted away their bids for the 2022 Winter Games. Vienna retreated from its 2028 Summer Games bid after a vote, too.


Everyone under the sun has denied this week’s Wall Street Journal report that “the U.S. Olympic Committee may drop Boston’s bid to host the 2024 Summer Games if local support doesn’t improve soon.”

But now comes today’s Boston Herald, which has apparently found a new go-to guy. “Boston 2024 should ‘clean house’ and install a ‘better team’ that can keep a shorter leash on Chairman John Fish and prevent more embarrassing gaffes — like questioning the patriotism of Olympic critics, U.S. Rep. Stephen F. Lynch told the Herald yesterday.”

Oh, right – we had forgotten that one: Bostonians are unpatriotic if they don’t support this game of five-ring monte.

Please, someone, put these people out of our misery.

Boston Herald’s Cohen Crazy Re: Climate Change

January 17, 2015

Only in the ditzy local tabloid could a character like Adriana Cohen have a regular column. But we’ll get back to that in a minute.

First, Page One of the New York Times:


Screen Shot 2015-01-17 at 11.20.37 AM


Then, Page One of the Boston Globe:


Screen Shot 2015-01-17 at 11.18.42 AM


Just for good measure, Wall Street Journal piece by Robert Lee Hotz (you can’t make this stuff up).

Now, back to Ms. Cohen’s piece today.

Glut of climate misinformation chilling

Is a thermometer a climate denier?

It must be because according to global-warming alarmists, the Earth is heating up, which will undoubtedly cause environmental “Armageddon.”

They demand our government (aka taxpayers) spend billions fighting climate change all while politicians pass job-killing regulations in the process.


And what’s her evidence? “My car thermometer registered negative 3 degrees last week! Pipes burst in homes and heating bills soared as the dreaded ‘polar vortex’ swooped down from the Arctic.”

Really. There’s ill-informed, and then there’s resolutely ignorant.

You pick.

New Balance Balances Local Dailies in ‘Heroes’ Ad

December 30, 2014

From our Late to the Parity desk

Local shoemaker New Balance yesterday saluted “each and every police officer, firefighter, first responder and service man & woman” in this full-page ad that ran in both – say it again, both – Boston dailies.


Screen Shot 2014-12-30 at 12.52.16 AM


Truth to tell, the ad also ran in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

But as the Heraldnix might say, why get technical about it.


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,380 other followers