Boston Globe Search Engine a Total Trainwreck (II)

April 7, 2016

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, the BostonGlobe.com search box is the ultimate digital black hole.

Exhibit Umpteen: Yesterday the Missus said, “Hey – remember that self-portrait of Ellen Day Hale we saw at the MFA the other day? Sebastian Smee wrote about it today in the Boston Globe.”

So we scurried over to BostonGlobe.com to check it out. And got this from a search for “Sebastian Smee.”

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 1.23.14 AM

Seriously?

So we hied ourselves to Google News and got this.

Hale’s magnetic, mesmerizing ‘Self-Portrait’

EllenDayHale_SelfPortrait

There’s blood in that pale, sinewy hand. Blood and resolve. Idle for now, it won’t stay that way for long. It’s poised for action.

The hand belonged to Ellen Day Hale, who painted it herself in 1885.

It’s part of a self-portrait, one of the best in the Museum of Fine Arts, where it hangs in the Art of the Americas Wing, in a gallery devoted to the so-called Boston School.

 

It is, as we’ve come to expect from Sebastian Smee, a thoroughly smart and insightful piece. It’s also a piece you’ll never find via the Globe’s online search engine.

Are we the only ones who think that’s a travesty?

Not to mention an actionable case of media malpractice.

Hey, Sebastian Smee – you feelin’ this?


BostonGlobe.com Search Engine a Total Trainwreck

March 19, 2016

Interesting Page One compare ‘n’ contrast in today’s Boston dailies: The Globe front-pages a story the Herald doesn’t have at all, and vice versa.

 

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Initially, we went to the papers’ respective search engines to double-check our first impression. Plug “Owen Labrie” into the Herald search box and you get this:

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It’s a bit of a jumble – the most recent story is listed fourth. But it’s the Library of Congress compared to what pops up in the Globe when you plug virtually anything into its search box. The Framingham rape from the Herald front page gets no hits, but plug in, say, “David Ortiz” and you get this:

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Click on that first link and you get a hockey story at the bottom of which is this:

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So, to recap: One search, two clicks, still no David Ortiz.

Try it for yourself. It’s crazy-making.

And entirely crazy: a non-searchable newspaper website.


Boston Globe Ad: German Reunification Is Wunderbar Boston Globe News: Not So Fast

October 5, 2020

Interesting juxtaposition in yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe.

Item One: This half-page Wunderbar Together ad on A12.

 

 

Body copy:

 

Wunderbar!

Item Two: This pickup on A15 from the New York Times piece by Katrin Bennhold.

 

 

Neo-Nazis go nuts graf:

“Reunification was a huge boost for the far right,” said [Ingo] Hasselbach, who left the neo-Nazi scene years ago and now helps others to do the same. “The neo-Nazis were the first ones to be reunified. We laid the foundation for a party like [Alternative for Germany]. There are things we used to say that have become mainstream today.”

 

Your headscratch goes here.


Boston Globe Whiffs Again on Alex Verdugo’s Past

September 7, 2020

In his Sunday Baseball Notes column, Boston Globe reporter Peter Abraham had this to say in one of his bulleted Red Sox observations.

▪ You can, and should, hate the Betts trade. But Sox fans are clearly warming up to Alex Verdugo.

Verdugo had an .875 OPS through his first 38 games, but it’s much more than that. He plays with passion, and after a few fundamental flubs early in the season has become an excellent outfielder. His seven outfield assists lead the majors. There are 23 teams who don’t have as many.

Verdugo also runs out every ground ball regardless of the score and seems genuinely happy to be playing for the Red Sox. There’s a lot to like.

 

Except, of course, that 2015 business about Verdugo witnessing the assault of a teenage girl by two of his minor league teammates and doing nothing about it. [CORRECTION: It was two women who committed the assault.]

Yesterday’s column was at least the second time that Abraham has put on the pom poms for Verdugo. Here’s what the hardreading staff wrote back in February.

The story has also been all over Twitter this past week. But there was nothing in the stately local broadsheet until this story by Peter Abraham and Alex Speier ran in the Boston Sunday Globe (and was buried on the website).

To call that eyewash is an insult to saline solution everywhere.

 

Especially since it omitted some significant facts, as Jessica Quiroli – who has chronicled the incident in chilling detail on her blog All Heels on Deck – noted on Twitter at the time.

It’s curious that neither one of those pieces by Abraham disclosed John Henry’s dual ownership of the Boston GlobeSox. In fact, very few Globe pieces on the Red Sox include disclosure these days. Even the normally fastidious Dan Shaughnessy, while trashing Red Sox ownership in this piece just up on the web, has dropped disclosure.

And as we’ve previously stated, before you bother pelting us with tweets, a) No, everyone does not know that Henry owns them both, and b) Even if everyone did know, the disclosure should still be in there.

Yes – every single time.


Boston Globe Recycles Work of Other Newsrooms

April 15, 2020

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

Let’s stipulate here that the Boston Globe has done yeoman’s work covering the local coronavirus calamity.

But let’s also acknowledge that the Globeniks have occasionally drafted off the work of other news organizations in the process.

Exhibit A: This Page One Globe story last Saturday.

 

 

Moving piece. No mention, though, of the Boston Herald’s Page One story that ran three days earlier.

 

 

Exhibit B: This piece by Steve Annear in yesterday’s Globe.

Separated by coronavirus, 88-year-old Watertown man uses bucket truck to see wife at nursing home

“They could have lifted me 10 stories and it would not have bothered me,” Nick Avtges said. “As long as I got to see her.”

Up until recently — before everything changed — 88-year-old Nick Avtges would wake up each morning, have his breakfast, and then head out to see his wife, Marion, at the Maristhill Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, where she’s been living for the last year. He would stay with her all day, hardly leaving her side.

“He’s been a very devoted husband,” said James Tracy, president and administrator of the Waltham center. “He never missed a day.”

But in March, as the novel coronavirus continued to spread, posing a critical threat to residents at facilities like the one where Marion, 85, is staying, the center went from reducing its visitations to not allowing visitors at all.

 

Once again, no credit to the original story by Joanna Tzouvelis six days ago in the MetroWest Daily News.

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, lots of other news outlets drafted off the MetroWest story without attribution.

But you’d think the Boston Globe – five days later – would be better than that.

Unfortunately, you’d think wrong.


Boston Globe on Verdugo Days Late, Disclosure Short

February 16, 2020

The story of newly minted Red Sox outfielder Alex Verdugo’s involvement it the alleged sexual assault of a minor in 2015 has been out there for over a year, thanks to baseball writer Jessica Quiroli, who chronicled the incident in chilling detail on her blog All Heels on Deck.

Nut graf:

She was one of the 75% of runaways who are female. And, as runaways often do, she found support where she could. Maybe on that February night in Glendale, Arizona, a city nine miles outside of Phoenix, she felt safe when she agreed to hang out with two women, who were a few years older than her, whom she’d met through social media.

Maybe the prospect of hanging out with Los Angeles Dodgers players, in town for Spring Training, sounded like fun. What she ultimately experienced was a twisted night of physical, verbal and sexual abuse. And, once she made her story known, she was subjected to more trauma.

 

The story has also been all over Twitter this past week. But there was nothing in the stately local broadsheet until this story by Peter Abraham and Alex Speier ran in the Boston Sunday Globe (and was buried on the website).

Verdugo explains ’15 police investigation

FORT MYERS, Fla. — New Red Sox outfielder Alex Verdugo acknowledged his involvement in a 2015 incident in Arizona that led to police investigating the alleged sexual assault of a minor by another player.

No charges were ever filed, and, in response to a question from a Globe reporter on Saturday, Verdugo said he was “cleared of any wrongdoing” in the matter.

“With that being said, it was a terrible thing that happened. It was in my past,” Verdugo said. “It was something that I’ve grown from it; I’ve learned from it.”

 

To call that eyewash is an insult to saline solution everywhere.

In addition, a number of significant facts were conspicuously missing from the Globe story.

 

 

One other thing missing: Disclosure of John Henry’s dual ownership of the Boston GlobeSox.

And before you bother pelting me with tweets, a) no, everyone does not know that Henry owns ’em both, and b) even if everyone did know, the disclosure should still be in there.

Yes – every single time.


Boston Globe Using Slimy Law Firm to Bust Its Union

October 13, 2019

Well the hardreading staff was listening to the latest episode of Slate’s excellent Trumpcast when we heard Above the Law contributor Elie Mystal say this to host Virginia Heffernan.

Jones Day has been basically the legal farm team for the Trump administration. It’s where [former White House counsel Don] McGann comes from. And McGann has brought along a lot of his kind of cronies and partners. It is where I think for something like 17 Jones Day lawyers have either had positions in the Trump administration or been nominated to judgeships by the Trump administration . . . They are being sued right now for some really troubling sexual harassment and hostile work environment allegations of refusing to pay women partners as much as men . . . There was one allegation where a associate of color claims that Jones they doctored her picture on their website to make her look darker . . . and widened her nose and made her look darker with Photoshop to say ‘Look see we got a black one. Leave us alone.’ The thing about Jones  that people need to understand is that this is totally on brand for Jones Day . . . This is a firm that got their start as a big tobacco law firm.

 

Wait – isn’t Jones Day the law firm the Boston Globe hired to negotiate a new contract with its newsroom and business employees?

Yes indeed, as the Boston Business Journal’s estimable Don Seiffert reported last December.

Boston Globe hires law firm known for taking hard line with unions

With the Boston Globe’s contract with newsroom and business employees set to expire at the end of the year, the paper has hired a law firm with a reputation for taking a hard line on media unions when it comes to contract talks.

In a memo to members last week, the Boston Newspaper Guild, which says it represents about 300 workers at the Globe, said the company recently hired law firm Jones Day, saying the firm is “known for union-busting in the media industry.”

 

But it’s not just union-busting on Jones Day’s resume.

Self-styled local paragons John Henry and Linda Pizzuti Henry have hired an allegedly sexist, racist, ethically challenged law firm to represent them in a purportedly good faith labor negotiation with its employees.

As the Globe turns, eh?


Boston Globe’s Wet Kiss to Children’s: Rx for $$$

September 30, 2019

As the hardreading staff unfolded its Boston Sunday Globe yesterday, we encountered this notice at the bottom of Page One.

Except . . .

We also encountered this 68-page magazine nestled inside the paper.

 

 

Must be an advertising supplement for Boston Children’s Hospital, we thought, given its relentlessly sunny-side-up Table of Contents.

 

 

But, actually, the magazine was produced by Boston Globe staffers.

 

 

It’s one puff piece after another, interspersed with dozens of costly congratulatory ads.

But no mention in those 68 pages of the hospital’s wanton destruction of the beloved Prouty Garden, or the battle over the hospital’s questionable expansion to service a projected – but by no means assured – international clientele.

(To be clear graf goes here)

To be clear, this isn’t the first time the Globe has played footsie with BCH. As we previously noted:

Boston Globe $hilling Again for Children’s Hospital

This is getting really flagrant.

As the hardreading staff has noted multiple times, the Boston Globe has put on a full-court press over the past week promoting the proposed expansion of Boston Children’s Hospital.

Last week it was an op-ed piece from former Massachusetts Taxpayer Foundation president Michael Widmer urging state officials to get off their duffs and approve the expansion, already. Problem was, the Globe failed to mention that Widmer sits on the hospital’s Board Committee for Community Service.

On Sunday, this Globe editorial urged the state’s Public Health Council to approve the project.

Now today comes this op-ed by Jack Connors Jr., chairman emeritus of Partners HealthCare.

 

Not to mention the Globe’s accepting full-page ads from Children’s as it supported the hospital’s expansion on its Business pages and providing op-ed space for BCH president and CEO Sandra Fenwick to plead her case unopposed by dissenting points of view, of which there have been many.

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, newspapers routinely produce vehicles largely designed to draw advertisers. This one just seems a little, well, germy.


104 Bay State Groups Call Out Boston Calling Verdict

September 16, 2019

Last month Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan – former aides to Boston Mayor Marty Walsh – were convicted in federal court on charges of extortion and conspiracy to commit extortion (both for Brissette, the latter for Sullivan) for their 2014 arm-twisting of the Boston Calling music festival to hire union workers.

Those verdicts led to a flurry of hand-wringing, as a quick search of the Googletron reveals.

 

 

Now comes this two-page ad that a gaggle of advocacy groups ranging from the A. Philip Randolph Institute to the Worcester Interfaith Coalition ran in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

 

 

(The same spread ran in yesterday’s Boston Herald just harder to read.)

Anyway, here’s the nut graf.

 

 

The hardreading staff is the first to admit that our legal knowledge comes entirely from the Jerry Orbach School of Law, but aren’t gender, race, and religion sort of protected classes in Massachusetts? And aren’t unions, well, not?

Regardless, back to that Google search above. Look closely and you’ll see one dissenting voice among the pearl-clutchers: Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi, who filed this piece in the wake of the Boston Calling verdicts.

Democracy chilled by campaign against Boston Calling verdict

You know what has a chilling effect on democracy?

Telling concert organizers if they don’t hire union workers they don’t need or want, the City of Boston won’t give them a permit for their event.

That’s what a federal jury found Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan, two city hall officials, guilty of doing. But in a bizarre twist of logic, some 70 nonprofit organizations, representing environmental, LGBTQ, housing, senior, education, and civil rights advocates, are calling out the verdict as a democracy slayer. Ten Boston city councilors also signed a statement, decrying the case as a “grievous misuse of limited prosecutorial resources in service of a misguided political agenda” and “a terrible precedent.”

Really?

 

Read the whole piece. It’s an effective chaser to the shot taken in yesterday’s double-trucks.


Hobby Lobby Runs Faith-of-July Ads in Boston Dailies

July 4, 2019

Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court’s favorite toy store, has placed full-page God and Country ads in today’s local dailies.

Here’s the Boston Herald’s page 9.

 

 

And here’s the Boston Globe’s A10.

 

 

The ads are a hodgepodge of quotes from U.S. presidents, Supreme Court justices, and – wait for it – Alexis de Tocqueville, all meant to bridge the church/state divide and claim the mantle of Psalm 33:12 – “Blessed is the nation whose God is the lord, the people he chose for his inheritance.”

Representative sample:

 

 

There are also websites listed where you can Chat About Jesus or download a Bible to your smartphone.

The hardreading staff supposes it should have some smart remark to insert here, but we’ll just let this one speak for itself.