Boston Globe Search Engine a Total Trainwreck (II)

April 7, 2016

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, the BostonGlobe.com search box is the ultimate digital black hole.

Exhibit Umpteen: Yesterday the Missus said, “Hey – remember that self-portrait of Ellen Day Hale we saw at the MFA the other day? Sebastian Smee wrote about it today in the Boston Globe.”

So we scurried over to BostonGlobe.com to check it out. And got this from a search for “Sebastian Smee.”

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 1.23.14 AM

Seriously?

So we hied ourselves to Google News and got this.

Hale’s magnetic, mesmerizing ‘Self-Portrait’

EllenDayHale_SelfPortrait

There’s blood in that pale, sinewy hand. Blood and resolve. Idle for now, it won’t stay that way for long. It’s poised for action.

The hand belonged to Ellen Day Hale, who painted it herself in 1885.

It’s part of a self-portrait, one of the best in the Museum of Fine Arts, where it hangs in the Art of the Americas Wing, in a gallery devoted to the so-called Boston School.

 

It is, as we’ve come to expect from Sebastian Smee, a thoroughly smart and insightful piece. It’s also a piece you’ll never find via the Globe’s online search engine.

Are we the only ones who think that’s a travesty?

Not to mention an actionable case of media malpractice.

Hey, Sebastian Smee – you feelin’ this?

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BostonGlobe.com Search Engine a Total Trainwreck

March 19, 2016

Interesting Page One compare ‘n’ contrast in today’s Boston dailies: The Globe front-pages a story the Herald doesn’t have at all, and vice versa.

 

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Initially, we went to the papers’ respective search engines to double-check our first impression. Plug “Owen Labrie” into the Herald search box and you get this:

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It’s a bit of a jumble – the most recent story is listed fourth. But it’s the Library of Congress compared to what pops up in the Globe when you plug virtually anything into its search box. The Framingham rape from the Herald front page gets no hits, but plug in, say, “David Ortiz” and you get this:

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Click on that first link and you get a hockey story at the bottom of which is this:

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So, to recap: One search, two clicks, still no David Ortiz.

Try it for yourself. It’s crazy-making.

And entirely crazy: a non-searchable newspaper website.


Our Mistake: Boston Globe Ran News Brief on BPL

August 3, 2018

Our eyes are obviously getting worse. Contrary to our last post, the Boston Globe did run an item about the Boston Public Library suspensions of three administrators under mysterious circumstances, smack in the middle of yesterday’s Metro Minute page.

 

 

In our defense, we had to go to the epaper to find it in the search engine – the website search engine produce endless pages of links to any article with “Boston” in it.

Our apologies all around.


Seriously, Where’s the Globe’s Wayne Woodlief Obit?

August 21, 2017

As the hardtsking staff has previously noted, the Boston Globe, for reasons known only to itself, has failed to run an obituary for the Boston Herald’s redoubtable Wayne Woodlief, who died on August 12.

Plug his name into the Globe search engine and you get this.

 

 

That one link leads to a 2011 Globe obit for Wayne’s late wife, Norine G. Johnson. But nothing for him.

Coincidentally, today’s Herald features this item.

Wayne Woodlief memorial service set for September

A memorial service to celebrate the life and memory of former Boston Herald columnist and political reporter Wayne Woodlief will be held Sept. 23 at 11 a.m. at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.

A reception will follow at a location to be announced.

Mr. Woodlief died Aug. 12 at the age of 82.

 

Maybe by then the Globe will have done the right thing and run a proper remembrance of a fellow journalist.


Subsidized Critic Makes Big $plash in Boston Globe

November 25, 2016

As both the Boston Globe and the New York Times noted several weeks ago, Zoë Madonna has started a 10-month gig as classical music critic for the Globe, which is receiving financial support from the Rubin Institute for Music Criticism, San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation (details on the SCFM pilot program here).

Madonna filed what seems to be her maiden piece on November 10 (hard to know for sure because the Globe’s search engine is a total trainwreck), but today she got the whole Names page.

 

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In the Globe story announcing Madonna’s arrival, editor Brian McGrory had this to say:

“We could not be more delighted to participate in this novel experiment with such worthy partners. We are excited about the benefit to our industry, to some of the great cultural institutions of Boston, and most especially to our readership, which will very much appreciate the proven talents of this young critic.”

 

The Times piece, on the other hand, addressed the part that might not be so beneficial: “[T]he new Globe arrangement raises journalistic questions, since some of the nonprofits that will help foot the bill for its critic come from the very music world Ms. Madonna will assess.

McGrory told the Times the Globe “would be on the lookout for potential conflicts and work to avoid them.”

The hardreading staff has no reason to doubt the purity of the Globe’s intentions or the integrity of Ms. Madonna’s work. We wish them both good luck in keeping the camels out.


‘Chill’ Out! Boston Globe Section Iced by Advertisers

November 7, 2016

As we approach ski season, the Boston Globe revived its Chill section yesterday (totally useless Globe search engine link here), which was created specifically to attract winter sports advertisers, but apparently does not.

Ironic Page One headline:

 

 

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Now call the (pay)roll:

There are two quarter-page ads (one for Summit Ski Shop, one for Mount Washington Resort at Bretton Woods) and one full-page ad (for Country Ski & Sport) in the 12-page section, but all the other ads are for the Boston.com Ski & Snowboard Expo, including this two-page center spread.

 

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In other words, Chill is just a big house ad for one of the Globe’s extracurricular activities.

The whole thing reminds us of the Chad Mitchell Trio’s classic “Super Skier.”

 

 

And two one-legged skiers went from there . . . 

Sounds like the Globe moving to State Street, yeah?


Boston Herald Emauls Globe on Brissette Extort Story

May 29, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

For the second straight day the Boston Herald has stiffed the Boston Globe in reporting about the Kenneth Brissette shakedown story.

Let’s start at the beginning, with yesterday’s Page One story in the Globe.

E-mails link Walsh aide to union deal

Stagehands passed festival proposal through Sullivan

A contract requiring the Boston Calling music festival to hire union stagehands in 2014 was submitted for review to a close aide to Mayor Martin J. Walsh during a time when federal prosecutors allege city officials illegally forced the concert organizers to hire unneeded union workers, according to city e-mails released Friday.

The stagehands passed the contract proposal to Boston Calling, a private entity, through Walsh aide Tim Sullivan, according to the e-mails, which were acquired by the Globe through a public records request. In an Aug. 20, 2014 e-mail, the union’s business manager lays out the terms of the agreement and thanks the administration for its assistance.

 

But here’s how yesterday’s Herald handled the story.

INCHES CLOSER TO MARTY

Communications reveal meetings between mayor’s advisers, Boston Calling, BrissetteScreen Shot 2016-05-29 at 1.18.27 PM

A top adviser and close confidante of Mayor Martin J. Walsh was looped into discussions about labor unions with Boston Calling organizers and tourism chief Kenneth Brissette at the same time federal prosecutors say Brissette was strong-arming festival officials to hire union workers, according to newly released emails.

 

“Newly released emails,” eh? Like out of the goodness of Walsh’s heart?

Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld also refers to them as “the newly released emails.” Just dropped out of the sky.

And so we get to today’s edition of the Herald, which features this follow-up referring to – wait for it – “newly released emails.”

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the Herald got its own set of City Hall emails released the other day, in this case over the Top Chef rumpus, as yesterday’s edition reported.

A livid TV production staffer warned a city tourism official that Boston was at risk of being blacklisted over heavy-handed union tactics, according to newly released emails.

The scores of emails, obtained by the Herald in a public records request, show the inner workings of the Boston Office of Tourism, Sports and Entertainment that was headed by Kenneth Brissette.

 

The Globe, as far as we can tell (because the Globe’s search engine is worse than useless), did not pick up on that story. Let’s hope if the lately local broadsheet does, it’ll show better manners than the dodgy local tabloid.


Doug Mohns Nothing to the Boston Globe

February 14, 2014

Splendid reader Bob Gardner sent this comment to Two-Daily Town yesterday in response to our post Lauren Bacall Killed by Boston Herald.

On the other hand, I haven’t been able to find any mention in the Globe today of the death of Doug Mohns. Mohns was one the great Bruins from the 1950′s and “60′s. Mohns was considered to be one of the best Bruin players at that time and (if I remember right) was one of the few players of that era who wore a helmet.
Mohn’s death was reported in the NY Times today but my search of Boston.com turned up nothing. That’s especially ironic, since not only did he play in Boston, but (according to the Times) was a resident of Bedford Mass at the time of his death.

 

New York Times obituary:

Doug Mohns, N.H.L. Player for 22 Seasons, Dies at 80

Doug Mohns, a durable and versatile skater who lasted 22 seasons in the National Hockey League, playing in seven All-Star Games, MOHNS-obit-web-master180died on Friday in Reading, Mass. He was 80.

The cause was myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood and bone marrow disorder, said his wife, Tabor Ansin Mohns.

For most of his career, which extended from 1953 to 1975, Mohns was a stalwart of the old, compact N.H.L. — when there were only six franchises, rivalries were especially intense, no one wore a helmet, and players were intimately acquainted with the strengths and weaknesses of players on every other club.

He played 11 seasons for the Boston Bruins . . .

 

As Gardner says, the Globe has essentially ignored the passing of Doug Mohns. Plug his name into the Globe’s search box and you get this (as of midnight Thursday):

 

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The Boston Herald hasn’t done much better. There’s only this mention that was tagged onto the February 9th Bruins Notebook (no link because the Herald is the Bermuda Triangle of search engines).

 

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Rest in peace, Doug Mohns.

Just not in the Boston dailies.

 


Globe Doubles Up on Stephen Minehan Memorial Ad at Herald’s Expense

June 25, 2013

Nineteen years ago yesterday, Boston Firefighter Stephen Minehan of Ladder 15, Engine 33 died in a fire on Boston’s waterfront.

On June 24, Lt. Stephen Minehan of the Boston (MA) Fire Department died after leading his company in a successful search for two other trapped firefighters at a blaze in a vacant waterfront warehouse. Minehan apparently became disoriented in the heavy smoke conditions and was separated from his company as they rescued the trapped firefighters. He radioed that he was trapped but several rescue efforts to find him were unsuccessful. He died of smoke inhalation and his body was recovered by his company several hours later.

 

Boston.com remembrance:

 

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Yesterday’s Boston Globe featured this ad on page A5 honoring Minehan’s sacrifice:

 

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Living in a two-daily town, you’d expect a companion ad in the Boston Herald, right?

Wrong.

Instead, the same ad – inexplicably –  ran in the Globe’s Metro section:

 

Picture 2

 

What’s the connection to the Residence Inn Marriott? Tudor Wharf is where Stephen Minehan died, and where a memorial to him was established in 2003.

But, apparently, that’s of no interest to Herald readers.

 


Herald Blows Lede in Michele McPhee Libel Suit

February 14, 2016

Today’s Boston Herald beat its crosstown rival to this story by Owen Boss:

Suit filed against reporter, news agencies for marathon bombings-related report

A Chelsea family with Chechen roots has filed a $105 million libel suit against journalist Michele McPhee and a Screen Shot 2016-02-14 at 1.47.03 PMhandful of news outlets that referenced a story she wrote for ABC News in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, claiming the 
article had a disastrous 
impact on their lives and personal relationships.

The Umarov family’s lawsuit — which was first reported by Universal Hub — was filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Boston and claims that McPhee’s article published March 4, 2014, titled “Feds Searching for Friend of Boston Marathon Suspect, ‘Concern’ Over Chechnya Trip,” has caused “irreparable damage to their reputations and esteem, as well as a loss of associations, and loss of potential gainful employment.”

 

The Herald’s web version doesn’t provide a link to the Universal Hub post or McPhee’s ABC piece. Worse, it doesn’t mention that McPhee is a former reporter and columnist at the dodgy local tabloid. You’d think they might’ve included that.

Then again, the Herald piece was quick enough to name the other defendants in the libel suit: McPhee Productions, ABC News, The Daily Mail, Heavy, Inc., News Corp. Australia, DMG Media, the New York Daily News and anti-Islamic activist and journalist Pamela Geller. A lot of deep pockets there.

Crosstown, at this moment anyway, the Boston Globe has nothing on the story.

(Parenthetically, is it just the hardreading staff or is the Globe’s search engine much lamer these days?)

More, no doubt, to come.