Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest Waste Ever (VIII)

December 2, 2019

As one of the Boston Herald’s 17 home subscribers, the hardreading staff noted numerous times over the past few years how the print edition of the skimpy local tabloid was often missing late-breaking news and – especially – sports scores.

That deficiency became even more glaring when the Herald shifted its printing a year and a half ago from the Boston Globe’s Taunton facility to the Providence Journal’s Rhode Island press, moving deadlines up to, oh, tea time.

(That contributed in no small part to our dropping the print subscription after several decades and going all-digital.)

But at least the Herald E-Edition would deliver the the later stuff.

Not any more.

Here’s the E-Edition reporting on the New England Patriots’ unthinkable (lookin’ at you, Dan Shaughnessy) loss to the Houston Texans last night.

 

 

As it says at the bottom of the left-hand page, you can get full coverage of last night’s game here.

But at that point, why would you bother?


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever.(VII)

May 23, 2014

As one of the 17 home subscribers the Boston Herald boasts, the hardreading staff has drastically reduced its expectations of the local daily. But the paper has failed to clear even that low bar. Actually it failed to jump at all today.

The foisty local tabloid told us it had “printing problems” last night. But of course the Herald has printing problems every night, BECAUSE ITS PRINTER IS ALSO ITS CROSSTOWN RIVAL.  So for the most part either 1) the Herald’s early edition gets printed – what? – 24 hours in advance, or 2) it doesn’t get printed at all.

Neither of those fates, unsurprisingly, is ever visited upon the Boston Globe.

Regardless, here’s the front page that did not land at the door of the Global Worldwide Headquarters this AM.

 

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Sleepy’s, eh? Sounds about right.

 


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever. (VI)

May 19, 2014

As the hardlyreading staff noted this past weekend, our front porch failed to nestle a Boston Herald delivery either Friday or Saturday.

But yesterday the twicey local tabloid tried to make up for it by delivering two copies of the Sunday edition.

Page One of the first:

 

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Just for the record, Page One of the second:

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-19 at 1.31.45 AM

 

Okay, we’re done now.

 


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever. (V)

May 17, 2014

From our Tab-void desk

As one of the 17 home subscribers to the Boston Herald, the hardreading staff has exceedingly low expectations in terms of quality of service.  But the heisty local tabloid has hit new lows this week.

Yesterday: No paper. “Printing problems,” they said. (What – Howie ran out of crayons?) But, the nice lady assured us, they’d include it with today’s delivery.

Today: Forget two – we got no Heralds this morning.  But we did get Barron’s. (Your head scratch goes here.)

Front page:

 

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Just for the record, front page of today’s Herald that we never got:

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-17 at 1.47.37 PM

 

Yeah. Whatever.

 


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever. (IV)

March 16, 2014

As the splendid readers of Two-Daily Town might remember, the hardreading staff is one of 17 home subscribers (a.k.a. The Few. The Proud. The Idiots) the Boston Herald boasts.

Consequently, here’s the front page of the fusty local tabloid that hit our porch this morning (tip o’ the pixel to the Missus).

 

IMG_2993

 

Right: All sports, all the time.

By contrast, here’s the front page of today’s Boston Globe.

 

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Exactly.

A later edition of the Herald did feature this front page, but the corn was off the cob by then. 

 

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We can’t wait until the Globe starts printing its papers  – and the Herald’s – in Millbury (see Dan Kennedy’s piece here). At that point the Sunday Herald will likely roll off the presses sometime Friday afternoon.

Fusty, indeed.

 


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever. (III)

October 31, 2013

Well the halfreading staff just got another call from the Heraldniks (rhymes with nudniks) who told us yes, we would not get the Boston Herald delivered to our home today. We should get it tomorrow, though.herald-zap

But good news! As subscribers we have free access to the fusty local tabloid’s E-Edition.

Hey, tell us something we don’t know. As the splendid readers of Two-Daily Town are likely aware, we often find the digital version of the Herald useful.

But – news flash! – we take the paper because we prefer reading it in print form.

Apparently we’ll be doubling our pleasure tomorrow.


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever. (II)

October 31, 2013

From our Or You Could Just Set Your Money on Fire desk

Call us the halfreading staff today. Earlier this morning we got a call from a Heraldnik saying the fusty local tabloid was experiencing printing problems so we might get our home-delivered copy of the Boston Herald this afternoon or maybe (and more likely, we’re guessing) along with tomorrow’s edition.

Seriously? Then again, we have had these kinds of problems before.

Just for the record, here’s Page One of today’s Boston Herald (via their E-Edition):

 

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And in the interest of fairness, here’s the Boston Globe’s front page:

 

Screen Shot 2013-10-31 at 12.43.57 PM

 

That one we got at home.


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste. Ever.

October 21, 2013

From our Or You Could Just Set Your Money on Fire desk

The hardreading staff had a neighbor some years ago who objected to our Boston Herald home subscription on the grounds that a Herald on our front porch “reduced property values.”

Yeesh.

But now we’re wondering about the value of the Herald itself.

Page One of Sunday’s home-delivered feisty local tabloid:

 

IMG_2453

 

Sports section Page One:

 

IMG_2447

 

(Photos courtesy of the Missus)

Sure, later editions (and the electronic edition) of the Herald sported this front page:

 

Screen Shot 2013-10-21 at 12.26.46 AM

 

But that didn’t do the hardreading staff any good.

The thing is, as home subscribers we’re the guaranteed money for the fusty local tabloid. And all 17 of us are getting lousy value for the dollar.

The hardreading staff, for one, is not happy.


Boston Herald’s New Home-Subscription Shenanigans

June 17, 2019

Now that the hardreading staff has gone all-digital and the Boston Herald is down to 16 home subscribers, the feisty local tabloid clearly needs to find new sources of revenue.

So buried on page 3 of today’s print edition is a To Our Readers box.

 

 

For those without magnifying glasses:

 

 

Really? An opt-out? That’s how you treat your faithful readers, Heraldniks?

And, all due respect, did it not occur to you to mention what the Special Section (Only $5.00!) is about?

Just wondering.


Boston Globe Looks for Subscribers . . . in the Herald

April 9, 2021

Well the hardreading staff was clicking through the Boston Herald’s E-Edition at our usual brisk pace when what should we come across but this.

 

 

Wait, what? The stately local broadsheet has taken to the feisty local tabloid to goose its circulation?

Get. Out.

The Globe’s virtual slumming comes at an interesting crisscross(road) for the paper, as illustrated by this graph from the Boston Business Journal.

As the BBJ’s crack managing editor Don Seiffert wrote last winter, it’s always smart to follow the money.

The Globe’s digital circulation has been the envy of regional daily newspapers nationwide in the past couple of years. It was one of the first papers in the nation to have more online subscribers than print ones last year.

The Globe has also raised its print prices to as much as $1,300 a year for some weekday subscribers, which may have accelerated the switch from print to digital. Some have even speculated that forcing readers to switch to online-only, thereby saving the business money, may be an intentional strategy.

Here’s a question, though: How does it make sense to trade a (potentially) $1300 a year print subscriber for a $360 a year digital subscriber? Not to mention, those departing print subscribers mean reduced print ad revenue as well.

Asking for a friend.

Meanwhile, the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation provided this update on the Globe’s Fall 2020 circulation numbers, which included roughly 220,000 digital-only subscribers.

Paid print Friday circulation was down to 81,579 as of early September, lower than the 12-month average by about 1,500. A similar slide was reported in the publisher’s statement that appeared on Sunday: print circulation was 139,307 as of Sept. 6, down nearly 10,000 from the 12-month average.

But, Kennedy also notes, “Like many papers, the Globe has been signing up new subscribers at a steep discount. The challenge will be holding onto them once they are asked to re-up at the full rate of $30 a month.”

Which, as best we can tell, is the highest digital subscription rate – by far – of any major metro newspaper in the country.

That’s a whole nother challenge.

Meanwhile, the thirsty local tabloid is downright parched these days, as the BBJ’s Don Seiffert noted several months ago.

The Herald, owned by Denver-based MediaNews Group since March 2018, said in a filing with the Alliance for Audited Media that its total weekday print circulation over the six months from April to September [of 2020] averaged 24,540 per day. That’s down from 34,219 in the same six month span in 2019 — a 28% drop in a single year.

Even more knee-buckling: “Over the six months from April to September [of 2020], single-copy sales of the Herald averaged 12,619 per day, according to the filing. Last year, the average from April to September was 21,331 — a 41% drop.”

Even more knee-buckling: The Herald’s digital subscriptions at the same time were somewhere south of 10,000.

So any advertising revenue is welcome at the scrawny local tabloid – even from the hately local broadsheet.