Independence Ad Leaves Boston Dailies Poles Apart

December 29, 2017

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The Polish Cultural Institute has reached up from the Big Town to run this full-page ad in today’s Boston Globe as part of the country’s celebration of 100 years of independence.

 

Body copy:

 

 

Except not you, Boston Herald.

Once again the thirsty local tabloid gets the air from an advertiser that thinks Boston is a One-Daily Town.

Of course, if this keeps up, it likely will be.

Advertisements

Boston Herald Still the Thirsty Local Tabloid for Ads

May 4, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The Boston Herald has long been the venue of last resort for full-page ads of the advocacy/corporate image/memorial sort.

As it was yesterday, when the Herald was bypassed by two ads that ran in the Boston Globe.

First, this Boston suck-up ad from GE (which in this town stands for Got Everything.)

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 12.47.59 AM

 

Then, this Boston Ad Club full-page backpat honoring diversity in a town that has long hampered diversity.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 12.48.43 AM

 

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, yesterday’s Herald did feature this full-page bank ad.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 1.08.46 AM

 

As well as this half-page Massachusetts tax amnesty ad.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 1.09.25 AM

 

Neither of which ran in yesterday’s Globe.

Still, there’s no question that the Herald is an afterthought in the eyes of local advertisers.

Which makes it all the more interesting that the feisty local tabloid seems to enjoy better fiscal fitness than the stately local broadsheet, which is now desperately downsizing (tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation) as it moves from its sprawling Morrissey Boulevard home to cramped quarters in Boston’s financial district.

So who’s really at a disadvantage, eh?


EXTRA! Thirsty Local Tabloid Gets Ad Love!

June 25, 2015

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff noted yesterday, the Boston Herald continues to be the wallflower at the local advertising dance.

Except today.

Lo and behold, occupying the entirety of page 9 was this ad, paid for by some outfit called the Coalition to Lower Energy Costs.

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-25 at 4.25.15 PM

 

Curious as always, we hied ourselves to the group’s website, which says this about the coalition:

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs is a non-profit Massachusetts association of individual consumers, labor unions, larger energy consumers and institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices. The coalition advocates for the new infrastructure we need to give all of us access to an adequate natural gas supply and lower our energy cost. This will require substantial new pipeline capacity, including one new pipeline from western Massachusetts to Dracut.

 

Huh. We kind of assumed some natural gas companies might be involved. They could, of course, be those “institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices” the website mentions. The About Us page doesn’t say.

But WMUR’s redoubtable John DiStaso does in this piece.

Pro-gas pipeline group makes regional push with new TV ad

Coalition to Lower Energy cost has ties to Kinder Morgan energy firm

img-Kinder-Morgan-pipeline-proposal-draws-opposition

MANCHESTER, N.H. —A group with ties to the proponents of the Northeast Energy Direct pipeline, proposed by the Kinder Morgan energy company, has begun advertising on WMUR and other television stations in New England.

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs has purchased time to air an ad 30 times over two weeks on the New Hampshire’s largest television station at a cost of more than $70,000.

Anthony Buxton, a Maine-based attorney who is a leader of the coalition and also represents Kinder Morgan in a Maine Public Utilities Commission proceeding, said plans call for the ad to air for a total of about three weeks on WMUR. He said it will also air on another New Hampshire television station, as well as two Maine stations and “several stations in Boston,” at a total cost of “several hundred thousand dollars.”

 

Here’s the spot:

 

 

So, mystery solved, yes? Well, no. Why run the print ad in the Herald but not the Boston Globe? Intrepid as ever, we’re sending an email to the coalition to ask.

Wanna know something else that’s strange? A different energy group – Nuclear Matters (you can read about them here) –  ran this full-page ad 0n A11 in today’s Globe.

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-25 at 4.55.49 PM

 

But that’s not the strange part. The strange part is the same ad ran on A13.

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-25 at 4.57.01 PM

 

Huh? We’re sending them an email too.

P.S. The Nuclear Matters ad also ran in the Herald. Good day for the firsty local tabloid, eh?


New Balance Balances Local Dailies in ‘Heroes’ Ad

December 30, 2014

From our Late to the Parity desk

Local shoemaker New Balance yesterday saluted “each and every police officer, firefighter, first responder and service man & woman” in this full-page ad that ran in both – say it again, both – Boston dailies.

 

Screen Shot 2014-12-30 at 12.52.16 AM

 

Truth to tell, the ad also ran in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

But as the Heraldnix might say, why get technical about it.


Boston Herald Plants Advertising Deeper Into News

February 3, 2018

The sneaky local tabloid just keeps getting sneakier.

As the hardreading staff has noted on multiple occasions, the Boston Herald’s publication of stealth marketing (a.k.a. “sponsored content”) has steadily become more and more – ah – stealthy, as the labeling of same grows smaller and smaller.

(Pop quiz: Is that an oxymoron, or are we?)

For example, here’s how sponsored content for intimate apparel retailer Rigby & Peller was labeled in March of 2016.

 

 

Then there’s this advertorial for the Massachusetts State Lottery from a year ago.

 

 

And now comes this from yesterday’s edition of the stealthy local tabloid. (Inexplicable Little Green 1 at no extra charge.)

 

 

Do we detect a pattern emerging here?

All of those ads in sheep’s clothing originated in interviews on Boston Herald Radio, which has up to several listeners but which more importantly provides the Herald with a steady stream of stealth marketing opportunities.

Given the Local Dailies DisADvantage the thirsty local tabloid labors under, that just might be the best it can do.


Even Ashton Kutcher’s Kids Blow Off Boston Herald

January 25, 2018

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The other week it was Nike plastering Kyrie Irving all over the Boston Globe and rejecting the Boston Herald.

Adding insult to financial injury, Ashton Kutcher’s two kids do the same today in this full-page salute to their Mom for being chosen Hasty Pudding’s Woman of the Year.

 

 

Two things:

One, do they really call their mother by her first name?

And two, we’re not ashamed to say we had to Google Wyatt and Dimitri to figure out who ran the ad.

As for the thirsty local tabloid, maybe Mila Kunis could carry a copy in Hasty Pudding’s traditional parade, which starts in roughly ten minutes despite multiple protests by students and feminists.

Via Google:

 

 

Missed by a Mila, huh?


Kyrie Irving & Nike Blow Right By Boston Herald

January 6, 2018

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The hardreading staff is sorry to say that this is the third time in a week we’re reporting from the LDD desk. (See here and here.) We fear we’ll soon be yielding to our kissin’ cousins at One-Daily Town.

But until then . . .

The Sports section in today’s Boston Globe features this two-page spread.

 

 

With a slight detour through Cleveland, of course. But no stopping at the Boston Herald.

While we’re on the topic of Nike and Irving, here’s the new TV spot he directed and stars in.

 

 

Gronk, Sun Tzu, flat earth, plant-based diet – totally memelicious, as SB Nation’s Tim Cato chronicles.

None of which, however, does any good for the thirsty local tabloid.


JetBlue Union Pilots Give Boston Herald the Air

January 5, 2018

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

For several years now, JetBlue Airways Corporation has had an interesting tagline attached to its logo.

 

Except not you, JetBlue pilots.

According to an Air Line Pilots Association press release, JetBlue has experienced five straight years of earnings growth, but its pilots have gone almost three years without a contract.

Through the first nine months of 2017, JetBlue has reported over $751 million in pretax profit (a 14.3 percent margin), bringing the total to more than $2.5 billion over the last two years since the pilots have been negotiating with the company. Meanwhile, the pilots are still without their first contract since unionizing in 2014, and without market-rate pay.

 

Consequently, the pilots have 1) filed for mediation from the National Mediation Board, and 2) started running this half-page newspaper ad – yesterday in the Boston Globe, today in the New York Times, but not at all in the Boston Herald.

 

 

At its website, the JetBlue pilots have a clever slogan and a count-up clock.

 

 

No doubt the thirsty local tabloid would settle for Ad Contract Above All.


Red Sox Play Ball with Herald in New Ad Campaign

December 18, 2017

As the hardreading safe has noted many times, the Boston Herald is routinely overlooked as an advertising vehicle by local institutions ranging from General Electric to Verizon to AJC Boston to CVS.

But . . .

The new ad campaign for Red Sox ticket sales is totally bi-paper-san.

From Saturday’s Boston Globe.

From Saturday’s Herald.

 

 

Some context here, from Ricky Doyle’s NESN profile of Rafael Devers in August:

“In my neighborhood, when I played vitilla (baseball with bottle caps), there was always this guy who would say, ‘Look at this one with that fresh face,’ and from then on I was ‘Carita.’ ”

Carita. Or Baby Face. Hmm… we’ll see if it sticks.

 

Clearly, it did.

Back to the Sox ads. Both local dailies ran this one yesterday.

 

No explanation need for that, right?

But maybe an explanation for the ad campaign itself is in order.

Red Sox ticket sales were off last year (2,917,678) from 2016 (2,955,434) according to Baseball Reference.

Regardless, here’s what ticket buyers can expect for next year, via Nik DeCosta-Klipa at Boston.com.

The team announced Wednesday that [2018] (ticket prices at Fenway Park will increase by an average of 2.5 percent. Similar to last year, this means ticket prices are going up $1 to $5 for many of the seats closer to the field, as well as the bleachers.

 

Red Sox to fans: Read it and keep (paying more).

Let’s see how many of them vamos next season.


EF Education First Puts PR First in Boston Globe Ad

October 2, 2017

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

Some of you splendid readers might be scratching your heads over this full-page ad in today’s Boston Globe.

 

 

EF is Education First North America, which loves the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation for millions of very good reasons.

To wit:

EF Education First Breaks Ground on Third Building in Cambridge, Creating International Education Campus Along Charles River

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker and many Commonwealth and City of Cambridge leaders today joined EF Education First North America CEO Dr. Edward Hult to break ground on the company’s third new building in Cambridge’s North Point neighborhood, which will result in the creation of 300 new jobs, acres of new public parkland and recreational amenities, and a new permanent operations and maintenance facility for the MA Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR).

 

The press release also notes this: “In 2014, the Massachusetts State Legislature unanimously passed special legislation allowing EF to acquire a 125,000-square-foot parcel of land owned by DCR and MassDOT for $20.4 million USD, which previously housed a temporary maintenance facility for DCR. The proceeds from the land sale will fund the construction of a permanent maintenance facility for DCR on one portion of the parcel, which represents an important unmet Big Dig mitigation obligation.”

Swell.

But wait, there’s more – this item ran in the Business section of today’s Globe, a sort of gift-with-purchase.

 

 

Interesting that the press release didn’t mention the $31 million state handout, but, hey, you can’t have everything.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, however, they pretty much can’t have anything. Education First might love the DCR, but it doesn’t care a fig for the thirsty local tabloid, presumably on the assumption that Herald readers aren’t interested in language classes and overseas education trips.

Huh.