No Credit Where Credit’s Due from Boston Herald

April 1, 2016

From time to time the hardreading staff issues credit reports on the stories the Boston dailies appropriate from one another. For example, yesterday we noted that Boston Globe reporter Joshua Miller’s Political Happy Hour gave a credit and a link to Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld’s scoop on the latest dustup between Suffolk University trustees and President Margaret McKenna.

We’re dismayed to report, however, that the frosty local tabloid declined to return the favor today in Donna Goodison’s piece about the redevelopment of the Seaport District’s Pier 4.

Pier 4’s peerless design

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Tishman Speyer released new renderings for its Pier 4 project in the Seaport District that will include a nine-story, 100-unit luxury condo building and 13-story office building, both with ground-floor retail and restaurant space.

The New York company plans to demolish the former Anthony’s Pier 4 restaurant next week to make room for a one-acre park and half-acre public plaza as part of its development on the South Boston waterfront.

 

That piece comes in the wake of Tim Logan’s far superior one that appeared in Wednesday’s Globe.

 

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No mention of the Globe’s piece in today’s stingy local tabloid, though.

C’mon, Heraldniks: Be a mensch, eh?

P.S. Boston Magazine’s Kyle Scott Clauss also picked up on the story today, but – to his credit – he did give credit to the Globe.


BG’s Mark Shanahan Stiffs Another Local Journo

May 16, 2017

As the hardreading staff has noted on multiple occasions, Boston Globe Names columnist Mark Shanahan regularly, er, re-curates the work of other Boston journalists.

Exhibit Umpteen: The Dennis Lehane/Emerson College Commencement Rumpus.

Monday’s Names column featured this Lehane interview with Emily Sweeney.

Representative sample:

What are some of the places you miss out here in Boston?

Oh God, I miss everywhere. I miss everywhere. The list is truly endless. I get jealous when my friends call me and bitch about [expletive] weather. Just the list of places is just too long to go into. I miss everything about that city.

Well, we miss you, too.

Aaaaw . .

 

But this Boston Magazine Daily piece by Spencer Buell yesterday presented a very different portrait of Lehane.

Dennis Lehane Apologizes for Using the N-Word in His Emerson Speech

“I should have known better.”

Author Dennis Lehane has apologized after receiving backlash for his use of the n-word during his Emerson commencement speech Sunday.

“Hurting people with the use of that word, of all words, was about as far from my intention as one could get, but I take ownership of the result,” he says in a statement. “I should have known better.”

In the speech, which cautioned against romanticizing the past, Lehane told a story about growing up in the 1970s during Boston’s busing crisis, when racial divisions in the city spiked over school desegregation.

He described driving with his family in a car through a swarm of protesters on Broadway in South Boston. The demonstrators had “hung effigies” of federal judge Arthur Garrity Jr. and Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy, and were “lighting them on fire with torches,” he recalled. He added, “They were screaming, ‘N—s out.’”

 

That’s all well and good: Two different news outlets with two different news angles. Business as usual.

The problem comes today, with this no-attribution follow-up from Shanahan.

Dennis Lehane apologizes for using racial slur in Emerson speech

Author Dennis Lehane has apologized for using a racial slur during his commencement speech at Emerson College Sunday. Lehane, a Dorchester native best known for his novels “Mystic River” and “The Given Day,” used the N-word while talking about the protests in South Boston during the busing crisis of the 1970s.

“I will never forget this for the rest of my life. We were trapped in the back of a car,” Lehane told graduates. “We couldn’t move. We could just be buffeted down the street. And they had hung effigies of Arthur Garrity, who was a judge at the time, of Teddy Kennedy, and they were lighting them on fire with torches. And they were screaming, ‘N—s out.’”

There were apparently complaints after the speech because Lehane issued a statement Monday morning apologizing for using the slur.

 

Here’s our complaint: Once again, Shanahan has cribbed material from another reporter without attribution.

Google News time check around midnight Monday:

 

 

C’mon, man – be a mensch and give credit where credit’s due, yeah?


Extra! Boston Herald Credits Globe Twice in One Day!

April 25, 2016

From our Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

In the course of covering local events, the Boston dailies often piggyback on one another’s stories, most often without acknowledging that the rival paper got there first. (See, for example, the Boston Globe’s routine drafting off the Boston Herald’s Grand Prix of Boston coverage.)

But sometimes one of the dailies does the right thing. Spoiler alert: It isn’t the Globe.

Page One of yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe featured this piece about Mayor Martin J. Wiretap.

Walsh is drawn into federal labor probe

Before he was mayor, when Walsh was a labor leader, he was heard on a wiretap saying he had warned a developer using non-union workers. Walsh denies it.

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A sweeping federal investigation into allegations of strong-arm tactics by unions has triggered a wave of subpoenas to union leaders, developers, and Boston City Hall staff, bringing scrutiny to Mayor Martin J. Walsh’s administration and his work as a labor leader before taking office in 2014, according to people familiar with the inquiry.

At issue in the investigation is whether labor officials threatened developers and business people who hired nonunion workers on their projects. Walsh, though apparently not an early focus of the probe, became drawn into it through wiretaps on which he was recorded in 2012, saying he had told a development company it would face permitting problems on a planned Boston high-rise unless it used union labor at another project in Somerville, according to people familiar with the tapes.

 

Well that’s a big story and you knew right off it would be in the Herald today and sure enough it gets a two-page spread.

 

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Nothing unusual there. But what does stand out are the two times the Globe is credited with breaking the story, first in Hillary Chabot’s piece:

Walsh yesterday shook off suggestions that a federal inquiry into labor strong-arming has any connection to his work as mayor. The Boston Globe reported that Walsh as the head of Boston Building Trades Council was heard on a wiretap in 2012 saying he had warned a developer to get union workers on a Somerville project or risk losing Boston permits.

 

Then a second time in this piece by Jack Encarnacao and Laurel Sweet:

The wiretapped statement was captured during a conversation between Walsh, then-head of the Boston Building and Construction Trades Council, and Laborers Local 22 leader Anthony Perrone, the Boston Globe reported yesterday citing unnamed sources.

 

Good for you, Heraldniks!

And, hey, you Morrissey Boulevardiers: Take a lesson, wouldja?


Poor CommonWealth Magazine: No Credit for Its Scoop

February 28, 2014

Yesterday, CommonWealth Magazine broke this story on its website:

Walsh reviewing Red Sox deal

Agreement makes permanent Van Ness Street arrangement

THE ADMINISTRATION OF Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said it is reviewing an agreement the city struck with the Boston Red Sox in October that formalized a long-standing arrangement allowing the club to close off Van Ness Street during Fenway Park events.

The agreement, signed by Red Sox president Larry Lucchino and Mayor Thomas Menino’s police and transportation commissioners, makes permanent what appears to have been an informal arrangement between the club and the city allowing the team to close off the section of Van Ness next to Fenway during games. The Red Sox typically used part of the street for employee parking, paying no fee to the city to do so.

“We are currently reviewing the agreement, and compensation is one of the issues that we will consider during this review,” said Walsh spokeswoman Kate Norton.

 

As day follows the night, today’s Boston Herald featured this piece of xerox journalism:

Marty Walsh digs into Fenway’s deals

The Walsh administration said yesterday it is examining two 2013 contracts the city inked with the Red Sox granting the team exclusive rights to public BI1E6414.JPGstreets — arrangements made in the final months of Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s tenure.

“We are currently reviewing the agreement, and compensation is one of the issues that we will consider during this review,” Kate Norton, a spokeswoman for Mayor Martin J. Walsh, said of a little-known “public safety order” city officials signed in October giving the Red Sox permission to seal off Van Ness Street during game days and other major events at Fenway.

 

Nowhere in the piece is CommonWealth given credit.

Ditto for these other news organizations, which picked up the story from the Associated Press. (Before anyone gets all shirty about it, news outlets add info to AP reports all the time. Just not in this case.)

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The Boston Globe, meanwhile, played catch-up, posting a piece to its website at 6 am.

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But at least the Globe gave credit where credit’s due.

The Walsh review was first reported by Commonwealth Magazine online Thursday.

 

Cold comfort, but better than the nothingburgers CommonWealth got from everyone else, yeah?

 


Boston Globe ‘Names’ Column Stiffs Boston Herald

April 28, 2017

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

It’s one thing for the Namesniks at the Boston Globe to rip off the hardreading staff. It’s quite another to xerox the Boston Herald without attribution.

From today’s Names:

 

 

Only one thing missing from the piece – acknowledgement that the firsty local tabloid’s Jessica Heslam had the story two days ago.

New honcho at 5 generates static

‘Move it’ mandate miffs on-camera staff

There’s a new “move it, move it” mandate being preached by Channel 5’s top newsroom honcho — but some miffed reporters don’t want to dance along.

Paige Harrison, who took over as WCVB-TV’s news director in January, has laid down a harsh edict demanding reporters get expressive during every TV live shot and stand-up.

 

Hey, Globies – maybe you could be more stand-up, eh?


Boston Globe Stiffs Herald on Korean War POW Story

August 16, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

Nice piece by Laura Crimaldi in today’s Boston Globe about the return of a Korean War vet who died in a prisoner-of-war camp.

Remains of Korean War POW coming home to Cambridge

US Army Corporal Ronald M. Sparks spent his last night in Cambridge more than 65 years ago, baby-sitting for his three young nephews before he left to fight in the Handout_13soldier01_metKorean War.

The night made a lasting impression on one of the boys, 3-year-old Bob, who woke up and found Sparks reading a newspaper in his family’s living room.

Sparks, who was 19 then, never returned.

But Bob, who met Sparks for the first and only time that night, has found his lost uncle and is bringing him home decades after he died in a prisoner-of-war camp in North Korea.

 

The Globe piece has everything you want in a human-interest story – drama, history, valor, persistence, and a happy, if bittersweet, ending.

It’s missing only one thing: A nod to Boston Herald columnist Joe Fitzgerald, who had the story in yesterday’s paper.

‘Uncle Ron is home at last’

Quest brings Korean War casualty back for burial

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Bob Sparks was almost 4 the first time he saw his uncle Ron.

“It was just before he shipped out,” Sparks remembers. “He was babysitting me.

“When I awoke and saw him, I was frightened. I asked, ‘Who are you?’ He said, ‘I’m your Uncle Ron, your dad’s little brother.’ He was in his uniform, and when I asked ‘Are you a soldier?’ he smiled and gave me this crisp salute. It’s my only personal memory of him.”

Ron Sparks, 19, then left the family home in Cambridge, bound for the Korean War with the Army’s 2nd Infantry Division . . .

 

It’s not unusual for one of the Boston dailies to draft off the other on certain stories, and it’s not like the Herald bats a thousand in the credit where credit’s due department. But still . . .

C’mon, Globe editors. Be a mensch.


Boston Herald Emauls Globe on Brissette Extort Story

May 29, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

For the second straight day the Boston Herald has stiffed the Boston Globe in reporting about the Kenneth Brissette shakedown story.

Let’s start at the beginning, with yesterday’s Page One story in the Globe.

E-mails link Walsh aide to union deal

Stagehands passed festival proposal through Sullivan

A contract requiring the Boston Calling music festival to hire union stagehands in 2014 was submitted for review to a close aide to Mayor Martin J. Walsh during a time when federal prosecutors allege city officials illegally forced the concert organizers to hire unneeded union workers, according to city e-mails released Friday.

The stagehands passed the contract proposal to Boston Calling, a private entity, through Walsh aide Tim Sullivan, according to the e-mails, which were acquired by the Globe through a public records request. In an Aug. 20, 2014 e-mail, the union’s business manager lays out the terms of the agreement and thanks the administration for its assistance.

 

But here’s how yesterday’s Herald handled the story.

INCHES CLOSER TO MARTY

Communications reveal meetings between mayor’s advisers, Boston Calling, BrissetteScreen Shot 2016-05-29 at 1.18.27 PM

A top adviser and close confidante of Mayor Martin J. Walsh was looped into discussions about labor unions with Boston Calling organizers and tourism chief Kenneth Brissette at the same time federal prosecutors say Brissette was strong-arming festival officials to hire union workers, according to newly released emails.

 

“Newly released emails,” eh? Like out of the goodness of Walsh’s heart?

Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld also refers to them as “the newly released emails.” Just dropped out of the sky.

And so we get to today’s edition of the Herald, which features this follow-up referring to – wait for it – “newly released emails.”

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the Herald got its own set of City Hall emails released the other day, in this case over the Top Chef rumpus, as yesterday’s edition reported.

A livid TV production staffer warned a city tourism official that Boston was at risk of being blacklisted over heavy-handed union tactics, according to newly released emails.

The scores of emails, obtained by the Herald in a public records request, show the inner workings of the Boston Office of Tourism, Sports and Entertainment that was headed by Kenneth Brissette.

 

The Globe, as far as we can tell (because the Globe’s search engine is worse than useless), did not pick up on that story. Let’s hope if the lately local broadsheet does, it’ll show better manners than the dodgy local tabloid.


Boston Globe Eats Herald’s Dust on IndyCar Coverage

April 24, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

Once again the Boston Globe has slipstreamed the Boston Herald’s coverage of the sputtering Grand Prix of Boston, which hopes to take place this Labor Day weekend.

Joe Battenfeld’s Friday Herald piece:

Race Hits Roadblock

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In another potentially serious setback to the Boston Grand Prix, a little-known city commission has blocked IndyCar race promoters from building parts of the course because of new climate change rules that require them to get a wetlands permit.

The 4-1 vote by the city’s Conservation Commission is the latest unexpected roadblock to the race, which has faced tough scrutiny from residents and a monthslong review from the city and state that put the Labor Day event in jeopardy.

 

Evan Allen and Jon Chesto’s Saturday Globe piece:

Conservation panel says Grand Prix needs more permits

Mayor Martin J. Walsh said Friday that he is optimistic IndyCar race organizers would be able to hold their event in South Boston in September, despite new environmental concerns raised by the Boston Conservation Commission.

“I’m hoping to see it here Labor Day weekend,” Walsh told reporters at a morning event. “I think there’s a process now they can follow, and I think they have to follow that process and make their case.”

In a 4-to-1 vote this week, the commission, which has responsibility for protecting wetlands in the city, concluded that the route planned for the race travels through a 100-year flood zone, and that organizers had to apply for permits that consider the potential environmental impact of any construction.

 

Nowhere does the Globe piece acknowledge that the Herald drove there first.

And this isn’t the only time the lately local broadsheet has drafted off the firsty local tabloid.

C’mon, Globeniks: Be a mensch, eh?


Boston Globe ‘Names’ Outs Howie Carr, Stiffs Two-Daily Town

February 10, 2017

Twice this week the hardreading staff has noted that Boston Herald columnist Howie Carr, a charter member of the Donald Trump coat holder brigade, is also now a member of Trump’s swanky Florida resort Mar-a-Lago.

We also noted that neither Boston daily had reported on Carr’s quantum leap in social status, ending yesterday’s post this way: “Hey – you Namesniks at the Globe: Wanna grab a piece of this?”

Apparently they did, since this appears under Mark Shanahan’s byline in today’s snakey local broadsheet.

Trump backer Howie Carr joins Mar-a-Lago

Conservative talk-show host Howie Carr fancies himself a man of the people, albeit one who went to an exclusive prep school (Deefield Academy), attended a fine liberal arts college (University of North Carolina), and resides in a wealthy Boston enclave (Wellesley). So it should be no surprise that, like any other average Joe, Carr has become a newly-minted member of the Mar-a-Lago Club, President Trump’s posh Palm Beach, Fla., retreat. Politico.com reports that Carr and his second wife, Kathy, are a few of the regular folks who’ve become Mar-a-Lago members since Trump moved into the White House. The Carrs must have really scrimped and saved to be able to swing the club’s initiation fee, which recently doubled to $200,000. We tried to reach Carr on Thursday to talk about the many perks and privileges he’ll be enjoying at Mar-a-Lago, but no luck. The right-wing radio host was an early supporter of Trump’s peculiar brand of populism and their friendship has only grown. Indeed, Carr was among 800 ordinary Americans who spent New Year’s Eve with Trump at the Mar-a-Lago Club.

 

Politico.com reports? Like all of a sudden you read the Politico Playbook item buried in last Monday’s edition?

C’mon, man – credit where credit’s due, eh?


Boston Globe Says ‘Suffolk U’ to Boston Herald

March 5, 2016

The slapfight at Suffolk University between president Margaret McKenna and the school’s board of trustees continues apace, as Laura Krantz reports in today’s Boston Globe.

PR firm is hired at Suffolk to help repair trustees’ image

Suffolk University trustees have hired public relations firm Rasky Baerlein to help repair their image after a three-week standoff between the board and President Margaret McKenna, a board member said Friday.

The firm will work exclusively for the board and will be paid by the university, according to trustee Jim Morris. He said the goal is to repair the board’s image and make sure the trustees’ side of the story is told. He said he did not know the cost of the arrangement.

 

Morris also told the Globe, “It’s not to declare war against her or anything like that. Everybody wants to calm this thing down. I think we’re on the verge of detente.”

No detente between the local dailies, though. Nowhere in the piece does it mention that Boston Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld had the story yesterday.

 

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C’mon, Globeniks – credit where credit’s due, yeah?