BG’s Mark Shanahan Stiffs Another Local Journo

May 16, 2017

As the hardreading staff has noted on multiple occasions, Boston Globe Names columnist Mark Shanahan regularly, er, re-curates the work of other Boston journalists.

Exhibit Umpteen: The Dennis Lehane/Emerson College Commencement Rumpus.

Monday’s Names column featured this Lehane interview with Emily Sweeney.

Representative sample:

What are some of the places you miss out here in Boston?

Oh God, I miss everywhere. I miss everywhere. The list is truly endless. I get jealous when my friends call me and bitch about [expletive] weather. Just the list of places is just too long to go into. I miss everything about that city.

Well, we miss you, too.

Aaaaw . .

 

But this Boston Magazine Daily piece by Spencer Buell yesterday presented a very different portrait of Lehane.

Dennis Lehane Apologizes for Using the N-Word in His Emerson Speech

“I should have known better.”

Author Dennis Lehane has apologized after receiving backlash for his use of the n-word during his Emerson commencement speech Sunday.

“Hurting people with the use of that word, of all words, was about as far from my intention as one could get, but I take ownership of the result,” he says in a statement. “I should have known better.”

In the speech, which cautioned against romanticizing the past, Lehane told a story about growing up in the 1970s during Boston’s busing crisis, when racial divisions in the city spiked over school desegregation.

He described driving with his family in a car through a swarm of protesters on Broadway in South Boston. The demonstrators had “hung effigies” of federal judge Arthur Garrity Jr. and Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy, and were “lighting them on fire with torches,” he recalled. He added, “They were screaming, ‘N—s out.’”

 

That’s all well and good: Two different news outlets with two different news angles. Business as usual.

The problem comes today, with this no-attribution follow-up from Shanahan.

Dennis Lehane apologizes for using racial slur in Emerson speech

Author Dennis Lehane has apologized for using a racial slur during his commencement speech at Emerson College Sunday. Lehane, a Dorchester native best known for his novels “Mystic River” and “The Given Day,” used the N-word while talking about the protests in South Boston during the busing crisis of the 1970s.

“I will never forget this for the rest of my life. We were trapped in the back of a car,” Lehane told graduates. “We couldn’t move. We could just be buffeted down the street. And they had hung effigies of Arthur Garrity, who was a judge at the time, of Teddy Kennedy, and they were lighting them on fire with torches. And they were screaming, ‘N—s out.’”

There were apparently complaints after the speech because Lehane issued a statement Monday morning apologizing for using the slur.

 

Here’s our complaint: Once again, Shanahan has cribbed material from another reporter without attribution.

Google News time check around midnight Monday:

 

 

C’mon, man – be a mensch and give credit where credit’s due, yeah?


Buried in the Globe, Headlined in the Herald

December 28, 2013

Deep inside a piece in today’s Boston Globe about a surprise birthday party for outgoing mayor Tom Menino is this:

“It is a little emotional,” Menino said. “I’ve been mayor for 20 years. I’ve done a lot of things in the last 20 years. I’m handing over the city to Marty Walsh to bring it to the next level.”

 

Except, according to the feisty local tabloid, he’s sort of not.

 

screen-shot-2013-12-28-at-1-12-33-pm

 

The story inside:

Mayor Thomas M. Menino said yesterday he will not attend Mayor-elect Martin J. Walsh’s Jan. 6 swearing-in ceremony — a perceived snub some political observers say signifies a deepening rift between the two pols.Mayor birthday

“It’s usually considered a sign of good faith that you are having a proper transition of power from one administration to another. It’s a common courtesy. The fact that Menino is not going to be there suggests there is some sort of hostility there with his successor,” said Thomas J. Whalen, a Boston University social science professor.

“It’s kind of mean and small-minded. The idea of a democracy such as ours … we put aside our political differences and at least put forth the front that we are one and we are united,” Whalen added.

 

Along similar lines, the Globe’s front-page story Teachers union revealed as funder behind pro-Walsh PAC has this buried in the 15th and 16th grafs:

“Transparency was a centerpiece of the campaign, and Mayor-elect Walsh was very clear in public from the beginning that all independent expenditures should voluntarily disclose their donors,” Kate Norton, Walsh’s spokeswoman, said in a statement provided to the Globe Friday evening.

“The law prohibits any coordination between the campaign and any independent expenditure,” she said in the statement. “We don’t have any control over or awareness of their plans. Mayor-elect Walsh urged disclosure through statements to the press and sought to lead by example in providing complete transparency of his record, background, and contributions.”

 

Sort of a non-disclosure disclosure, eh?

Crosstown, the Herald played it this way on page 2:

Marty Walsh denies knowing AFT funded PAC ads

Mayor-elect Martin J. Walsh is claiming he had no idea the Boston teachers’ powerful national union was behind the last-minute, W1ST9604.JPGhalf-million-dollar ad drop by a mysterious PAC dubbed One Boston, whose pro-Walsh TV spot helped sweep him to victory in the campaign’s final weeks . . .

Walsh spokeswoman Kate Norton restated what the campaign said during the race, that they were prohibited by law from coordinating with outside groups, let alone knowing who was behind them.

 

One town, two different places.

UPDATE: The hard reading staff missed this Globe New England in brief item:

Mayor Thomas M. Menino will not attend the inauguration of his successor, Martin J. Walsh, on Jan. 6. Dot Joyce, Menino’s spokeswoman, said he had already made plans to go on vacation by the time inaugural details were finalized. She said Menino believes the inauguration is “Marty Walsh’s day,” and the mayor will meet with him that morning to hand over the reins. Joyce said Menino does not wish to slight Walsh, but rather wants to honor the fact that he will be the new mayor. Menino’s decision was first reported by the Boston Herald.

 

The rare local-on-local disclosure.

Yes!

Still, what we said.


Merry Christmas Carroll!

December 25, 2013

From our One Town, Two Places desk

The local dailies published their traditional year-end poems yesterday, and they couldn’t be more different.

First up, the Boston Globe’s annual holidays card to readers, in verse compliments of Joseph P. Kahn.

Greetings of the season, all.

In setting up this conference call

To wish you cheer these holidays

We pray beseech the N.S.A.24poem

To please refrain from scooping data.

(OK, we’ll talk. But maybe later?)

For feeling in the yuletide mood

Our disposition’s not improved

With thoughts of clandestine surveillance

By Santa-suited federal agents.

We’d much prefer the privacy

Of carols trilled around the tree,

Children’s laughter in the air,

Stockings hung with affordable care,

Missives filled with peace and love

And swift access to HealthCare.gov.

 

And Kahn is off to the races.

Crosstown, the Boston Herald delivers its annual words of good cheer compliments of Track Gal Gayle Fee.

‘Twas the night before Christmas

And on the Fast Track,

Not a creature was stirring

They were all in the sack.

The Track Shack was cluttered

122413TrackToon13With our worn-out Jimmy Choos.

We’d taken them off.

It was time for a snooze.

The Tracklets were nestled

All snug in their beds,

While visions of iPads

Danced in their heads.

The Track was curled up

In our jammies so snug.

After a whole year of gossip,

We were resting our tongues!

 

Until they weren’t.

What’s interesting is how little intersection there is in the two ditties.

The feisty local tabloid devotes six stanzas to Boston sports; the stately local broadsheet, just this:

First, pour a whiskey, single-barrel,

For all the hirsute Sons of Farrell:

Pedey, Papi, Daniel Nava,

Closer Koji Uehara.

Salud to bullpen cop Steve Horgan,

Donna Tartt, and Freeman, Morgan.

 

Name-dropping in the Herald: Kim Kardashian, the Wahlbergs, Ben Affleck, Whitey Bulger.

Name-dropping in the Globe:

Among pals we’ve wrapped presents for

Are Chiwetel Ejiofor,

Ivan Klima, Omar Sy,

And brave Malala Yousafzai.

Wassail to you, Jennifer F. Boylan,

Mark Pollock, Ben Cherington,

Mireille Enos, Janet Yellen

And ageless Sir Ian McKellen.

 

Finally, references to crosstown rivals.

Herald:

He filled all the stockings,

Winked and pulled on a lobe.

“All the good stuff’s for the Herald.

Coal for John Henry’s Globe!”

 

Globe:

What crosstown rival?

And then there’s this from the hardreading staff:

Merry Christmas!

(Bill O’Reilly, eat your heart out.)

P.S. Family lore has it that my old man wanted to name his first-born Mary Christmas Carroll. Cooler heads (read: Jackie’s Agnes) prevailed.


Boston Herald Has Health Issues

November 9, 2013

From our One Town, Two Different Places desk

To the Boston Herald, Obamacare is melting down. To the Boston Globe, it’s just gearing up.

Page One of today’s feisty local tabloid:

 

Screen Shot 2013-11-09 at 2.16.45 PM

 

Inside story:

Mass. health care sign-ups lag among those forced to switch

 

AN3V7516.JPG

 

Just weeks before a Jan. 1 enrollment deadline, state officials admitted yesterday that just 1 percent of the 150,000 Bay Staters facing canceled heath insurance under Obamacare rules have signed up for new plans.

Massachusetts Health Connector officials told the Herald that only 549 applicants — out of the 150,000 Bay Staters forced to switch their health plans to comply with Obamacare rules — are poised to receive insurance through the new system.

Technically, officials explained, even those few haven’t actually enrolled in new health plans yet.

“No, nobody’s enrolled,” said Scott Devonshire, chief information officer of the Massachusetts Health Connector, “because enrollment … doesn’t happen until a (health plan) carrier receives payment. It’s a semantics issue, I guess.”

 

And we know how much the Herald loves semantics issues, being so fastidious about details and all.

The Globe, for its part, is more like oblivious. From today’s page B1:

Parity rules issued for mental health care

The Obama administration issued rules Friday requiring most health insurers to provide similar coverage for people with mental and physical health problems, even as Massachusetts regulators pushed insurers this week to show that they are already complying with the spirit of the law.

The day marked a milestone for mental health advocates across the country who have been waiting five years since President George W. Bush signed the mental health parity law for its patient protections to go into effect.

“This final rule breaks down barriers that stand in the way of treatment and recovery services for millions of Americans,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a press release.

 

Not a word about healthcare signup problems for Massachusetts residents. On the other hand, though, “Massachusetts is seen as further ahead than many states in providing access to mental health care.”

That’s good news for the Heraldniks, because Obamacare’s driving them crazy.


Mayoral Race Black-and-White in Local Dailies

September 26, 2013

Same town, different places.

The Boston dailies have very – wait for it – different takes on how candidates of color fared in Tuesday’s mayoral preliminary. Start with the front page of today’s Boston Herald.

 

Picture 1

 

Inside story, with Rivers’ byline:

CE1_4373.JPGFractured minority bloc defeated itself

Of the Irish it has jokingly been said by members of their own community that they love to fight and hate to win. And of the Palestinians it is frequently observed, again by their own, that they never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity.

My experience in this mayoral contest has confirmed the belief that we blacks appear to be a combination of the two observations above.

 

(Just wondering: how is it that Eugene Rivers winds up in the news pages of the Herald when his piece clearly belongs on the op-ed page? The paper should be covering the guy, not embedding him in the newshole.)

After establishing that he was a “very public and outspoken” supporter of Charlotte Golar Richie (although, he writes, “this is not a brief for Richie”), Rivers proceeds to blame the absence of a black candidate in the general election on the black community’s failure to unite behind one candidate. “[W]e could have rallied around the individual who was most likely to survive the preliminary election and have a shot at becoming the first minority leader of the city.

That individual, of course, would have been Charlotte Golar Richie. Not to get technical about it.

Crosstown, the Boston Globe didn’t consider it a total loss.

kreiter_richie3_metIn loss, city’s diverse candidates made a mark

They had come this far.

Each had slogged through countless handshakes, participated in numerous debates, and struggled to raise money, while trying to make history as the first minority mayor.

When polls closed and ballots were counted Tuesday, the six candidates of color had collectively garnered 34.7 percent of the votes.

But none of those candidates made the final cut.

 

According to one political observer, the race was a success in “[showing] that these diverse candidates are qualified to be mayor and can get nearly 40,000 votes in the primary.”  But it was a failure in terms of actual political power.

The Globe piece called it a “solid showing” and added this:

More people are engaged in conversations about affordable housing, educational achievement, and jobs for at-risk youths, and the mayoral contenders attribute that to having a diverse pool of candidates in the race, political observers said.

 

Cold comfort, no?

Interestingly, there’s no specific mention of the too-many-candidates-of-color issue, but Darnell Williams, president of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts,  promised a “come-to-Jesus meeting . . . to put the needs of the community before individual interests.” And, he added, that called for “trustworthy ambassadors.”

Your conclusion goes here.