Boston Herald No Longer a Lively Index to the Globe

May 7, 2014

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

For years the hardreading staff has described the feisty local tabloid as a sort of sprightly daily summary of the Boston Globe.

No more.

The  crosstown rivals are absolutely living in parallel universes at this point.

Exhibit Umpteen: There are three big local stories on the front page of today’s Globe – the region’s big hit from climate change; GOP gubernatorial wannabe Mark Fisher’s alleged shakedown of state party officials in return for his dropping out of the race; and Boston College’s returning its Belfast Project tapes to the interviewees to avoid more mishegoss like last week’s Gerry Adams rumpus.

 

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Exactly none of those three stories appears in the Herald.

Then again, there is this kickoff to the Herald’s two-part series on Bay State legislative shenanigans, which gets just about all of Page One:

 

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And let’s not forget this exclusive from Track Gal Gayle Fee:

 

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Those Namesniks at the stately local broadsheet need to get crackin’, yeah?

 

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Boston Globe Stiffs Herald – After Herald Stiffs Worcester Telegram – on Boy-Beating Girl Golfer

October 28, 2017

The hardreading staff has on more than one occasion referred to the Boston Herald as a “lively index to the Boston Globe.”

But every now and again it’s the Globe that becomes a lowly caboose to the Herald.

Like yesterday.

Let’s begin with this piece in Thursday’s Herald.

TEEING OFF ON BOYS’ CLUB

Girl golfer wins tourney, MIAA withholds her trophy

The record books won’t note Emily Nash’s amazing three-over-par high school tournament victory — because she’s a girl.

That has golfers from all over the country calling to praise the 16-year-old Lunenburg High junior who beat all the boys.

“It still kind of stinks,” Nash told the Herald last night. She had to give up the trophy to the second-place finisher.

“I’m disappointed I didn’t get the trophy. But that’s OK. Even if I didn’t get the trophy, everyone knew my score,” she said. “In golf, it’s all about the rules.”

 

In the news business, though, the rules are slightly looser. So on Friday, the Globe unblushingly ran this piece.

Girl golfer beats boys, denied trophy

MIAA rule book allows her to play, but not to win

She was allowed to golf with the boys, but the rules didn’t allow her to beat them.

So when Emily Nash, a Lunenburg High School junior, shot the best score at the Central region Division 3 high school golf tournament at Blissful Meadows in Uxbridge on Tuesday, officials had to hand the trophy to the best-scoring boy, who had finished four strokes back.

 

Drive the Herald nuts graf:

“The statewide rule that denied her a victory will be reviewed and possibly changed, high school sports officials said. On its face, it certainly seems like an injustice to deny a trophy to the golfer with the best score, and Nash’s story has quickly gained national attention, amplified by social media and highlighted on the Web page of the PGA.”

Not to mention local attention, which the Globe conveniently did not mention.

Low class, Globeniks. Very low class.

UPDATE:

(Tip o’ the pixel to @lordpaluzzi via @dankennedy_nu)


Boston Herald News-Stalking Stephanos

September 13, 2015

Man, the flirty local tabloid has some crush on Maria, eh?

As the hardreading staff noted, the Boston Herald gave anchor Maria Stephanos’ departure from Fox 25 full-page play in Friday’s edition, versus a paltry Names item in the Boston Globe.

Yesterday it was two pages, with former Fox 25er Doug (VB) Goudie doing the mooning.

[A]s I watched Maria Stephanos’ farewell last night on Fox 25, I couldn’t help but feel that as she was leaving that building, “different” was leaving the Boston TV news market, at least for now.Screen Shot 2015-09-13 at 1.00.20 PM

After all, Maria epitomized everything that Fox was — loud, smart, sassy, engaging … not afraid to mix it up, not afraid to laugh at herself and not afraid to give a hug. Or a “VB!!!!!” in that high pitch only Maria can hit when she is outraged!

Combine Maria’s exit with that of Fox 25 investigative reporter Mike Beaudet, and “different” is now taking a dirt nap.

 

Today we’re back to one page.

(WARNING: As with a solar eclipse, we advise you not to look directly at the photo of Stephanos and Howie Carr.)

 

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Meanwhile, crosstown at the Globe, the only mention of Stephanos’ exit or the local TV news scene beyond the aforementioned Names item is this mention in Joshua Miller’s Political Happy Hour on Friday.

STEPHANOS LEAVING FOX 25, via Jessica Heslam on BostonHerald.com: “FOX 25 anchor Maria Stephanos — a fan favorite who has been at the Boston TV station for nearly two decades — is leaving the station to ‘pursue new professional endeavors,’ the station just announced. Her last day is tomorrow. ‘I have decided it’s time for me to embark on a new adventure,’ Stephanos said in a statement announcing her surprise departure. …” http://bit.ly/1ODowij

 

How sad is that – the Globe once again a lively index to the Herald, instead of the other way around.

Ouch.


Globe a Lively Postscript to the Herald

December 29, 2013

The hardreading staff has often referred to the Boston Herald as a lively index to the Boston Globe.

But things got turned around yesterday when the feisty local tabloid went Page One with outgoing mayor Tom Menino’s decision to skip the inauguration of his successor, Marty Walsh.

Went Page One gleefully, we might add – and exclusively in the local dailies’ bakeoff.

 

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Today the Boston Globe has the story Page One Metro, and the stately local broadsheet gives credit to the Herald high up in the piece.

Menino won’t see Walsh sworn in

Mayor breaks with tradition of going to successor’s event

Breaking with the city’s historical precedent, outgoing Mayor Thomas M. Menino will be one of just a handful of Boston mayors in the past century who did not attend their successors’ swearing-in ceremonies.

Menino told reporters on Friday that he will not formally participate in the Jan. 6 inauguration of Mayor-elect Martin J. Walsh.

“No,” Menino said, when asked by a Boston Herald reporter if he would be involved in the swearing in. “It’s Marty Walsh’s day. It’s not Tom Menino’s day.”

 

But today is the firsty local tabloid’s day, isn’t it?

 


Boston Globe a Day Late, Charlie Card Short on MBTA Ring Story?

August 27, 2013

From our stately local broadsheet’s The Hive on Monday:

rings-bigThis ring guarantees easy access to the T

Sick of fishing through your purse or flashing your wallet every time you ride the MBTA? A Kickstarter project, Sesame Ring, is offering stylish RFID rings that you can simply tap against CharlieCard readers as you sail through the crowds.

“Having missed the train many times while fishing for our CharlieCards, we looked for a solution in wearable technology. After months of hard work, we created the 3D-printed Sesame Ring, supported by the MBTA,” the project page states. “Now, you can walk right up to the gantry, use scientifically approved magic, and scoot on through!”

 

At first glance, the Globe is sucking hind teat here.

From the Googletron:

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But look closer and you see that Globe kissin’ cousin boston.com had the story four days ago – before the other news outlets.

(Except for Boston Magazine’s Boston Daily blog. But neither outlet credits the other, so tie goes to boston.com.)

Two-Daily Town Assignment Desk: Let’s see if the Boston Herald, routinely a lively index to the Globe, picks up this story in the next few days.


Herald Accuses Boston Media of Ripping It Off

August 4, 2013

Day Umpteen of the Boston Herald’s flogging its new Garage Broadband Radio station featured this newsvertising page in Saturday’s edition of the dicey local tabloid:

 

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The unbylined piece claims that the Herald has routinely been the assignment desk for Boston’s broadcast news media.

 

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And all this time we thought the Herald was just a lively index to the Boston Globe.

Go figure.


Herald a Lively Index to the Globe (Mayoral Hopefuls’ Income Edition)

June 12, 2013

From our Compare and Contrast in Clear Idiomatic English desk

Coincidentally (or not) both local dailies have salary surveys of the Boston mayoral candidates today, with – wait for it – mostly different numbers.

Start with the Boston Herald:

AN3V9806.JPGBIG BUCKS BACKING BIDS

Herald review shows top earners in mayor’s race

Dorchester health care executive Bill Walczak is the wealthiest among the top tier of mayoral candidates, reporting a staggering $450,000 salary, while state Rep. Martin J. Walsh and City Councilor Michael P. Ross each reported earning more than $200,000, and two others hauled in a quarter-million dollars with their spouses, a Herald review of candidates’ tax returns found.

Walczak, co-founder of the Codman Square Health Center, and his Boston schoolteacher wife, Linda, reported earning a combined $526,000 in 2011, according to a tax return supplied by the Walczak campaign.

 

Like that “staggering”? That’s the Herald all over.

The feisty local tabloid also listed the incomes of former state representative Charlotte Golar Richie, Boston School Committeeman  John Barros, Boston City Councilors Felix Arroyo, Rob Consalvo, and John Connolly, and Suffolk District Attorney Dan Conley.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, the story looked like this:

Income of Boston mayoral hopefuls varies

Many looking to succeed Menino now earn more than city’s median income

There are no Mitt Romneys in the bunch, no nine-digit personal fortunes, no eye-popping investments. But roughly half of the candidates hoping to succeed Thomas M. Menino as mayor of Boston earn more than double the city’s annual median household income of almost $52,000.

Four of the aspirants would face pay cuts if they move into the fifth-floor office that belongs to the mayor, a job that pays $175,000 a year.

As campaigns clash this summer over affordable housing and the plight of the middle class, tax returns can provide a glimpse of each candidate’s socioeconomic status. The Globe requested 2012 state and federal tax returns for all 15 people running for mayor and found that income varied from roughly $59,000 to $700,000. One candidate gave almost $19,000 to charity; another donated a few hundred dollars, the returns showed.

 

The stately local broadsheet also included this helpful chart.

 

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Notice not just the different numbers, but the Globe’s inclusion of Robert Cappucci, “a former School Committee member and retired Boston police officer who collects a pension,” and its listing of tax rates and charitable donations – both quite telling.

Notice also who failed to provide tax returns, most conspicuously Councilor Charles Yancey.

Follow-up, anyone?


The Essential Difference Between the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald

March 31, 2013

Both Sunday dailies have reports on the Boston taxicab industry, and the difference between them tells you all you need to know about the two news organizations.

Boston Globe:

 

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Picture 4

 

Picture 3

 

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And that’s just the first of three parts.

Boston Herald:

 

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Once again, the Herald is a lively index to the Globe.

Don’t get the hardreading staff wrong: We yield to no man in our appreciation of the feisty local tabloid. Hell, we’re one of its 17 home subscribers.

But it’s always good to remember what’s what with the Boston dailies.

 


Herald Schools Globe on Ed Chief Exit

March 12, 2013

From our Hark! The Herald! desk

This is one story our feisty local tabloid has owned.

Picture 2

 

From Chris Cassidy’s Boston Herald report (the online version):

block1312_1New setback for Deval Patrick: Early ed boss quits

Embattled Sherri Killins resigns after Herald reports

The Patrick administration’s embattled early education chief abruptly stepped down from her $200,000-a-year post last night after a series of Herald reports that raised questions about her moonlighting in a post-doctoral program that trains school superintendents, as well as her residency in New Haven, Conn.

“The questions being raised started to distract from the work she was doing,” Matt Wilder, spokesman for the Executive Office of Education, said of departing Early Education and Care Commissioner Sherri Killins. “So it made sense to offer her resignation and move on.”

 

Here’s when the Boston Globe reported it (note the 4:20 AM):

Picture 1

 

And here’s what our stately local broadsheet reported. Give credit to the Globe – they gave credit to the Herald. Twice:

A top state education official has stepped down from her position amid questions over her enrollment in a program that trains school superintendents.

Sherri Killins, commissioner of the state Department of Early Education and Care, resigned Monday, said Matthew Wilder, a spokesman for the state agency that oversees the department, in an e-mail early Tuesday.

Killins’s abrupt resignation was first reported by the Boston Herald. The newspaper previously reported that Secretary of Education Matthew Malone was investigating her enrollment in the superintendent training program in Ware, which has taken her away from her official duties in her nearly $200,000-per-year state job.

 

Another turnabout in newspaper business as usual: the Globe as lively index to the Herald.


Thursday Globe Totally Eats Wednesday Herald’s Dust

March 1, 2013

The hardreading staff likes to characterize the feisty local tabloid as a lively index to the Boston Globe.

But in this case, the Boston Herald was a lively index to the next day’s Boston Globe.

Exhibit A

Wednesday’s Herald Page One:

picture-119

 

Thursday’s Boston Globe:

greenhouse_donnie3_metroEmerson frat backs a brother in transition

On Monday morning, few outside his circle of family, friends, teachers, and classmates likely had heard of Donnie Collins. By Wednesday, he was internationally famous.

Collins, a sophomore at Emerson, seems in many ways a typical college student. He loves J.R.R. Tolkien and “The Colbert Report.” He obsessively updates his Tumblr blog.

But it is his differences that have caused his story to go viral: Born female, Collins is transitioning into a man, and members of his campus fraternity are giving new meaning to the word brotherhood through an extraordinary act of support.

“I’m really grateful for that,” he said in an interview Wednesday near the downtown campus. “It’s taken me a while to realize that I can’t possibly repay them in any way except to accept their help.”

 

Exhibit B

Wednesday Herald Joe Battenfeld column:

DSC_1359.JPGEd Markey is no stranger 
to flip-flopping on issues

Democratic Senate candidate Ed Markey, whose supporters have slammed rival Stephen Lynch for changing his position on abortion, has performed a few impressive flip-flops of his own — on issues ranging from abortion to school prayer.

The Malden congressman, who has the strong backing of abortion rights advocates, supported a constitutional amendment banning abortion and repeatedly voted in the U.S. House for a ban on all federal funding of abortions, including in cases of rape and incest, in the late 1970s, records show.

Markey, a Catholic, changed his position in late 1983, just before he made an unsuccessful run for the U.S. Senate. He said at the time he didn’t want to impose his personal beliefs on others.

 

Thursday’s Boston Globe:

tlumacki_ed markey_metro861Markey says abortion shift was personal

Since US Representative Stephen F. Lynch of South Boston backed off his staunch opposition to abortion early this month, his rival for US Senate has been trying to distinguish himself as the only Democrat in the race who is “100 percent pro-choice.”

US Representative Edward J. Markey of Malden has made the case so well, in fact, that the abortion rights group NARAL Pro-Choice America plans to formally endorse him on Thursday.

But three decades ago, Markey was also an abortion opponent who had a conversion before embarking on a campaign for higher office. His evolution began as a congressman, months before he ran for the same Senate seat he’s seeking now.

Like Lynch’s shift, Markey’s change engendered some suspicion. The National Organization for Women issued flyers highlighting Markey’s past votes against abortion rights, and antiabortion advocates were annoyed that Markey had abandoned them.

In an interview on Wednesday, Markey said his shift on abortion was never a political calculation.

 

Uh-huh.