Boston Herald Still the Thirsty Local Tabloid for Ads

May 4, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The Boston Herald has long been the venue of last resort for full-page ads of the advocacy/corporate image/memorial sort.

As it was yesterday, when the Herald was bypassed by two ads that ran in the Boston Globe.

First, this Boston suck-up ad from GE (which in this town stands for Got Everything.)

 

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Then, this Boston Ad Club full-page backpat honoring diversity in a town that has long hampered diversity.

 

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(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, yesterday’s Herald did feature this full-page bank ad.

 

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As well as this half-page Massachusetts tax amnesty ad.

 

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Neither of which ran in yesterday’s Globe.

Still, there’s no question that the Herald is an afterthought in the eyes of local advertisers.

Which makes it all the more interesting that the feisty local tabloid seems to enjoy better fiscal fitness than the stately local broadsheet, which is now desperately downsizing (tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation) as it moves from its sprawling Morrissey Boulevard home to cramped quarters in Boston’s financial district.

So who’s really at a disadvantage, eh?


EXTRA! Thirsty Local Tabloid Gets Ad Love!

June 25, 2015

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff noted yesterday, the Boston Herald continues to be the wallflower at the local advertising dance.

Except today.

Lo and behold, occupying the entirety of page 9 was this ad, paid for by some outfit called the Coalition to Lower Energy Costs.

 

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Curious as always, we hied ourselves to the group’s website, which says this about the coalition:

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs is a non-profit Massachusetts association of individual consumers, labor unions, larger energy consumers and institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices. The coalition advocates for the new infrastructure we need to give all of us access to an adequate natural gas supply and lower our energy cost. This will require substantial new pipeline capacity, including one new pipeline from western Massachusetts to Dracut.

 

Huh. We kind of assumed some natural gas companies might be involved. They could, of course, be those “institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices” the website mentions. The About Us page doesn’t say.

But WMUR’s redoubtable John DiStaso does in this piece.

Pro-gas pipeline group makes regional push with new TV ad

Coalition to Lower Energy cost has ties to Kinder Morgan energy firm

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MANCHESTER, N.H. —A group with ties to the proponents of the Northeast Energy Direct pipeline, proposed by the Kinder Morgan energy company, has begun advertising on WMUR and other television stations in New England.

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs has purchased time to air an ad 30 times over two weeks on the New Hampshire’s largest television station at a cost of more than $70,000.

Anthony Buxton, a Maine-based attorney who is a leader of the coalition and also represents Kinder Morgan in a Maine Public Utilities Commission proceeding, said plans call for the ad to air for a total of about three weeks on WMUR. He said it will also air on another New Hampshire television station, as well as two Maine stations and “several stations in Boston,” at a total cost of “several hundred thousand dollars.”

 

Here’s the spot:

 

 

So, mystery solved, yes? Well, no. Why run the print ad in the Herald but not the Boston Globe? Intrepid as ever, we’re sending an email to the coalition to ask.

Wanna know something else that’s strange? A different energy group – Nuclear Matters (you can read about them here) –  ran this full-page ad 0n A11 in today’s Globe.

 

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But that’s not the strange part. The strange part is the same ad ran on A13.

 

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Huh? We’re sending them an email too.

P.S. The Nuclear Matters ad also ran in the Herald. Good day for the firsty local tabloid, eh?


Fraidy Local Tabloid Won’t Cover the Boston Globe

April 10, 2016

What’s with the Boston Herald?

As the hardreading staff noted last month, the Herald resolutely refused to cover the Boston Globe’s Chernobylesque home delivery meltdown earlier this year. The Globe itself labeled it a “delivery debacle,” which we wrote “should be mother’s milk to the thirsty local tabloid but . . . nothing.”

Now comes the juicy memo from Globe editor Brian McGrory (first reported on Thursday in the redoubtable Dan Kennedy’s Media Nation) announcing a “no-sacred-cows analysis of our newsroom and what the Globe should look like in the future.”

McGrory framed it this way: “If a wealthy individual [who, presumably, is not John Henry] was to give us funding to launch a news organization designed to take on The Boston Globe, what would it look like?”

Regardless, don’t you want to hear the flamey local tabloid’s answer to that question? But over the past few days the Heraldniks have given us . . . bupkis.

Some speculate that the Herald has been laying off the Globe because the Globe prints the Herald. But that deal’s been in effect for three years and didn’t keep Herald columnist Howie Carr from lambasting the Globe for its Tsarnaev brothers coverage.

So why is the feisty local tabloid AWOL now?

All suggestions gladly accepted.


Tabloid Trumpets Terror Techie

September 5, 2014

Today’s Boston Herald goes to town on local boy gone bad Ahmad Abousamra, the Stoughton man wanted for terrorism and suspected of being a social-media guru for ISIS/ISIL/Islamic State – whatever name they’re going by these days.

 

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Inside, the Terror Techie gets the Full Osama.

 

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Get it – Post-er? Yeah, us too.

The news report itself is straight out of Tabloid 101 (with four – count ’em, four – bylines):

A 32-year-old computer whiz who was raised in Stoughton is suspected of using the high-tech skills he honed at Hub colleges to spread the bloodthirsty message of ISIS terrorists on social media, according to a Herald source and news reports.

Ahmad Abousamra — who was educated at Northeastern University and UMass Boston — had already been placed on the FBI’s Most Wanted Terrorists list last year with a $50,000 reward offered for information leading to his capture and return.

The FBI said Abousamra “has shown that he wants to kill United States soldiers.”

He is now believed to be a social media warrior for the heartless terrorists behind the recent beheadings of two Americans.

 

Wow.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, Abousamra gets more measured treatment:

Mass. terrorist suspect may be aiding militants

The spotlight that has been cast on the Islamic State terror group in Syria has also put a new focus on a Massachusetts man wanted for terrorism, who is believed to 2012-10-03T204235Z_01_TOR605_RTRMDNP_3_USA-SECURITY-ABOUSAMRAbe living in that country and possibly supporting ISIS.

Ahmad Abousamra, who grew up in Stoughton and attended schools in the Boston area, faces terrorism charges in federal court in Boston, and the FBI in December put him on its Most Wanted Terrorists list. A $50,000 reward has been offered for information leading to his capture, and officials believe he has been living in Aleppo, Syria.

 

The Globe story did contain one fact the Herald missed: “Lowell Police Sergeant Thomas Daly – a member of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force . . . said Abousamra has a ‘high-pitched voice that would distinguish him from others.’'”

Presumably not, however, as high-pitched as the freaky local tabloid’s.


Boston Herald Pages Not (Amazon) Prime Real Estate

September 15, 2022

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

Fact of life: The Boston Globe is always going to garner far more advocacy/corporate image/memorial full-page advertising than the Boston Herald.

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, we get why, say, Mass General Brigham last Sunday would run this double-truck only in the stately local broadsheet.

(There was also a third full-page ad that went with those two, which meant MGB spent some serious money. Then again, those U.S. News & World Report rankings have gone over like the metric system for quite a while now, so maybe not the wisest investment.)

For the life of us, though, the headscratching staff cannot understand why this full-page ad ran in today’s Globe but not today’s Herald.

Hey – if even NFL telecasts ignore the thirsty local tabloid and treat Boston like a One-Daily Town, it just might become one.


Boston Herald Contracts a Mild Case of the Merchies

February 4, 2022

As the splendid readers of this blog well know, the Boston Herald’s print circulation has been circling the drain for quite some time now.

A year ago, according to the redoubtable Don Seiffert at the Boston Business Journal (subscription required), numbers filed with the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) indicated that the Herald’s average weekday circulation had fallen to 22,032, which is roughly equivalent to the number of iced coffees your local Dunkin serves every day.

Knee-buckling graphic from the BBJ.

Consequently, it’s no surprise that the thirsty local tabloid has looked to sources other than its actual news gathering to bolster the bottom line.

Enter the Boston Herald Store.

This week the flailing local tabloid has run full-page and quarter-page ads promoting its Newsroom Collection, urging readers to “Show your support for local journalism with Boston Herald apparel and mugs.”

 

Here’s the store’s full inventory.

 

Really, Heraldniks? That’s the best you got?

No GlobeBusters baseball caps?

No Howie (American) Carrnage bomber jackets?

And where’s the I Get It in the Morning. That’s Right: The Herald replica of the paper’s vintage 1970s t-shirt?

(UPDATE: The Missus reliably informs me that it was actually a sweatshirt. She had one when she worked at the paper in 1975. On the front it said I Get it Every Morning . . . and on the back That’s Right. The Herald. At the time, the flashy local tabloid was a broadsheet with a daily circulation north of 350,000.)

The hardreading staff knows that it’s tough putting out a daily paper with a newsroom that can barely field a parks and rec soccer squad.

But maybe the Herald’s puppet management could prevail on the vampire capital hedge fund sucking the lifeblood out of the paper to at least send it off with some decent valedictory merchandise at its sad little online store.

Or is that too much to ask in a world of death by a thousand paper cuts?


Boston Globe Looks for Subscribers . . . in the Herald

April 9, 2021

Well the hardreading staff was clicking through the Boston Herald’s E-Edition at our usual brisk pace when what should we come across but this.

 

 

Wait, what? The stately local broadsheet has taken to the feisty local tabloid to goose its circulation?

Get. Out.

The Globe’s virtual slumming comes at an interesting crisscross(road) for the paper, as illustrated by this graph from the Boston Business Journal.

As the BBJ’s crack managing editor Don Seiffert wrote last winter, it’s always smart to follow the money.

The Globe’s digital circulation has been the envy of regional daily newspapers nationwide in the past couple of years. It was one of the first papers in the nation to have more online subscribers than print ones last year.

The Globe has also raised its print prices to as much as $1,300 a year for some weekday subscribers, which may have accelerated the switch from print to digital. Some have even speculated that forcing readers to switch to online-only, thereby saving the business money, may be an intentional strategy.

Here’s a question, though: How does it make sense to trade a (potentially) $1300 a year print subscriber for a $360 a year digital subscriber? Not to mention, those departing print subscribers mean reduced print ad revenue as well.

Asking for a friend.

Meanwhile, the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation provided this update on the Globe’s Fall 2020 circulation numbers, which included roughly 220,000 digital-only subscribers.

Paid print Friday circulation was down to 81,579 as of early September, lower than the 12-month average by about 1,500. A similar slide was reported in the publisher’s statement that appeared on Sunday: print circulation was 139,307 as of Sept. 6, down nearly 10,000 from the 12-month average.

But, Kennedy also notes, “Like many papers, the Globe has been signing up new subscribers at a steep discount. The challenge will be holding onto them once they are asked to re-up at the full rate of $30 a month.”

Which, as best we can tell, is the highest digital subscription rate – by far – of any major metro newspaper in the country.

That’s a whole nother challenge.

Meanwhile, the thirsty local tabloid is downright parched these days, as the BBJ’s Don Seiffert noted several months ago.

The Herald, owned by Denver-based MediaNews Group since March 2018, said in a filing with the Alliance for Audited Media that its total weekday print circulation over the six months from April to September [of 2020] averaged 24,540 per day. That’s down from 34,219 in the same six month span in 2019 — a 28% drop in a single year.

Even more knee-buckling: “Over the six months from April to September [of 2020], single-copy sales of the Herald averaged 12,619 per day, according to the filing. Last year, the average from April to September was 21,331 — a 41% drop.”

Even more knee-buckling: The Herald’s digital subscriptions at the same time were somewhere south of 10,000.

So any advertising revenue is welcome at the scrawny local tabloid – even from the hately local broadsheet.


Boston Herald Quarantined From Full-Page COVADS

April 5, 2020

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff has noted numerous times, the Boston Herald has long been the wallflower at the local advertising dance.

And so it remains in the time of coronavirus.

To be sure, Kappy’s Fine Wine & Spirits has been a loyal customer lately with full-page ads like this one.

 

 

And Stop & Shop ran this thank you ad today.

 

 

But that’s pretty much it for the thirsty local tabloid.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, though (wait – that doesn’t work any more since the Globe moved to State Street and the Herald moved to Braintree and anyway everyone’s working remotely so the hell with it) – the full-page ads are coming fast and furious.

Yesterday there was this ad from the Veterans Cannabis Project urging Gov. Charlie Baker (R-Bogart) to designate all adult-use Massachusetts cannabis dispensaries as essential services.

 

 

Auto magnate Herb Chambers also went full-page yesterday.

 

 

Today is even better for the stately local broadsheet. It got the Chambers ad again and the Stop & Shop thank you ad. But today’s edition also features this Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts ad.

 

 

Body copy:

And this Uber ad.

 

 

Body copy:

 

 

Memo to Blue Cross and Uber: Maybe next time send some of that love to the Herald as well.


Juul’s Vape-and-Switch of Boston Herald in Ad Blitz

June 12, 2019

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, Juul Labs  – the company that owns 75% of the e-cigarette market – has locally run ads like these exclusively in the Boston Herald.

 

 

 

Now, though, faced with numerous lawsuits, Juul Labs is in Defcon 2 as our kissin’ cousins at Campaign Outsider have deftly noted, not to mention this piece by Lachlan Markay and Sam Stein in The Daily Beast.

Juul Spins Vaping as ‘Criminal Justice’ Issue for Black Lawmakers

The company has embarked on a massive lobbying campaign designed to reach the Congressional Black Caucus.

The vaping industry’s unrivaled leader, Juul, is making a huge push to ingratiate itself with America’s communities of color, hoping that doing so will win it critical allies within the Democratic Party who can help it navigate a high-stakes legislative and regulatory minefield.

The company has hired lobbyists and consultants with deep ties to prominent black and Latino lawmakers, steered money to congressional black and Hispanic caucuses, and made overtures to leading civil rights groups. It has enlisted the services of a former head of the NAACP, a board member of the Congressional Black Caucus’s political arm, and the Obama White House’s top civil rights liaison. And it’s sought the support of National Action Network chief Rev. Al Sharpton.

 

Two Daily Town rule of thumb (pat. pending): Whenever Al Sharpton is involved, kindly walk – do not run – to the nearest exit.

Given all that, Juul has now embarked on a full court press of full-page ads in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Boston Globe.

But not the Boston Herald.

Your condolences for the thirsty local tabloid go here.


Stop & Shop to Boston Herald: Eat Your Heart Out

April 14, 2019

Now that the Teamsters have gone out in sympathy with the nearly 31,000 Stop & Shop workers who went on strike three days ago, management is apparently looking for some sympathy of its own. Thus, this full-page ad in today’s Boston Globe.

 

Here’s their website if you want more of management’s side. One thing they do not address is why they didn’t run the ad in the Boston Herald.

Afraid the readership is too union-friendly and an ad addressed to them would be a waste of money? Or just oblivious to the thirsty local tabloid, like so many others in this town.

Whatever, let’s hope those readers stop shopping at Stop & Shop. For good.