Boston Globe Eats Herald’s Dust on IndyCar Coverage

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

Once again the Boston Globe has slipstreamed the Boston Herald’s coverage of the sputtering Grand Prix of Boston, which hopes to take place this Labor Day weekend.

Joe Battenfeld’s Friday Herald piece:

Race Hits Roadblock

Screen Shot 2016-04-24 at 1.00.21 AM

In another potentially serious setback to the Boston Grand Prix, a little-known city commission has blocked IndyCar race promoters from building parts of the course because of new climate change rules that require them to get a wetlands permit.

The 4-1 vote by the city’s Conservation Commission is the latest unexpected roadblock to the race, which has faced tough scrutiny from residents and a monthslong review from the city and state that put the Labor Day event in jeopardy.

 

Evan Allen and Jon Chesto’s Saturday Globe piece:

Conservation panel says Grand Prix needs more permits

Mayor Martin J. Walsh said Friday that he is optimistic IndyCar race organizers would be able to hold their event in South Boston in September, despite new environmental concerns raised by the Boston Conservation Commission.

“I’m hoping to see it here Labor Day weekend,” Walsh told reporters at a morning event. “I think there’s a process now they can follow, and I think they have to follow that process and make their case.”

In a 4-to-1 vote this week, the commission, which has responsibility for protecting wetlands in the city, concluded that the route planned for the race travels through a 100-year flood zone, and that organizers had to apply for permits that consider the potential environmental impact of any construction.

 

Nowhere does the Globe piece acknowledge that the Herald drove there first.

And this isn’t the only time the lately local broadsheet has drafted off the firsty local tabloid.

C’mon, Globeniks: Be a mensch, eh?

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One Response to Boston Globe Eats Herald’s Dust on IndyCar Coverage

  1. […] In the course of covering local events, the Boston dailies often piggyback on one another’s stories, most often without acknowledging that the rival paper got there first. (See, for example, the Boston Globe’s routine drafting off the Boston Herald’s Grand Prix of Boston coverage.) […]

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