No Drag: It’s Stoned Driving Day in the Boston Rags!

August 9, 2018

It will come as no surprise to alert readers of the local dailies that the two could attend the same event – yesterday’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over – and emerge with radically different angles on the drugged driving initiative. For the Boston Globe, the story is prevention; for the Boston Herald, it’s enforcement. Who woulda thunk?

Start with the State Street Sobriety Squad, for whom Dan Adams filed this report.

Mass. rolls out new ad warning of danger of driving stoned

 

With the debut of recreational marijuana sales imminent, Massachusetts safety officials on Wednesday unveiled a new television ad warning consumers against driving under the drug’s influence.

The 30-second spot, dubbed “The Roads You Take,” is meant to discourage driving while stoned, drunk, or impaired by other drugs.

It features a diverse group of people walking toward the camera and solemnly intoning fragmentary phrases: “There are roads — the ones you take, the ones you don’t. There are laws. There are rules. And there’s you — you driving; you drunk driving; you driving high; you stoned and driving; you spinning, crashing; you arrested; you killing,” before concluding, “there are roads, and then there are just dead ends.”

 

Here’s the TV spot in the $280,000 ad buy.

 

 

Meanwhile, crosstown on Fargo Street Mary Markos filed this (police) report.

STATIES SWAB VS. STONERS

Authorities seek Breathalyzer equivalent for pot

State police — expecting a surge in drugged driving now that pot is legal, and looking for a way to prove a driver is high — are finalizing a test of swabs they administered on about 170 people at roadside sobriety checks and a drug treatment center.

The Massachusetts State Police assessment is part of a nationwide effort by police to deal with the lack of chemical tests for drug intoxication comparable to Breathalyzers that are used to measure drunkenness. Legal experts say any chemical test is likely to face challenges in court.

 

They’re both good, informative pieces that reflect the beauty of a two-paper town: The safely local broadsheet vs. the tokey local tabloid.

Read ’em and beep.

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Boston Globe Hits Red Sox with a Big Kayn Aynhoreh

August 7, 2018

Page One of today’s Boston Globe Sports section is the very definition of a jinx on the Red Sox.

 

 

Christopher Gasper’s column labeling the Red Sox “close to unbeatable” and the New York Yankees “feckless and fundamentally unsound” tiptoes right up to the hexing post. But Chad Finn’s confetti tossing puts a full-tilt whammy on the Olde Towne Team.

It’s all over but the accounting. For all intents and purposes, the Red Sox clinched their third straight AL East title Sunday night.

 

Kayn aynhoreh.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, the estimable Steve Buckley provides a more sober-minded perspective.

Put hold on celebration

Despite Sox’ big lead, anything possible

Such was the Red Sox’ annihilation of the Yankees this past weekend that the remainder of the regular season has been reduced to little more than a stretching exercise for October.

Right?

The Sox have wrapped up the American League East, leaving the humbled, hurtin’ Yankees and their fans to collect themselves and start planning for that scary one-and-done wild card game against the Oakland A’s or Seattle Mariners.

Right?

 

Not so fast, Buckley says.

Now there’s a man with respect for the evil eye.

Hey, the hardworking staff knows we’re a mere Made Yankee Fan in Boston. But we might also be the canary in the coal mine.


Boston Herald – Not the Globe – Gets Family Juul Ads

August 6, 2018

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and Juul Labs are currently arm-wrestling over kids and e-cigarettes.

Two weeks ago the AG went public with her concerns about teens being the target of Juul e-cig ads, as the Boston Globe’s Jerome Campbell reported.

AG suspects e-cigarette maker JUUL of marketing to minors

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey has begun investigating the popular vaping company JUUL Labs Inc., saying that it appears to be marketing its products to minors.

“Just when teen cigarette use has hit a record low, ‘juuling’ and vaping have become an epidemic in our schools with products that seem targeted to get young people hooked on nicotine,” Healey said at a news conference Tuesday.

The company’s vaping devices are designed to appeal to young consumers, Healey said, with a sleek, high-tech appearance and a variety of protective skins that make them look like school supplies.

 

Healey’s investigation focuses on “whether California-based JUUL adequately monitors its website ‘to see how effective they are at preventing minors from accessing JUUL or JUUL compatible products.’” Campbell notes that according to a 2016 US surgeon general report, e-cigareete use among high school students spiked 900% between 2011 and 2015.

(It says a lot that high schoolers have verbified “juul,” as Jia Tolentino points out in this smart New Yorker piece.)

Meanwhile, Juul Labs is in the middle of a campaign that is, according to a spokeswoman, “committed to providing parents with key facts about JUUL, vaping and nicotine. To that end, we selected a handful of print, digital and radio outlets initially in a variety of markets across the country, including Boston, and we will look at other outlets in the future.”

(For more from the company, see this press release.)

The print outlet here is the Boston Herald, where this full-page ad has run four or five times in the past month.

Of course the “cigarettes are for adults” is the oldest reverse-psychology gambit in the tobacco industry playbook, but why get technical about it.

A companion series of ads prominently features 1) adults, and 2) the potential public health benefits for America’s forty million smokers.

 

 

The ad points you to juul.com/pat for that guy’s story, but good luck cutting through the cyberhaze there.

So back to the “What Parents Need to Know About JUUL” campaign, which entails “[an] initial investment of $30 million over the next three years dedicated to independent research, youth and parent education, and community engagement efforts.” It also entails this radio spot that provides parents with Juul Facts to pass on to their kids.

But here’s one fact Juul Labs doesn’t mention, via this piece from Business Insider’s Erin Brodwin.

Adult customers say they find the high nicotine content as satisfying as conventional cigarettes, but the Juul also has a growing number of teen fans, whose developing brains are uniquely vulnerable to addiction. Those teens could become a new generation of smokers, researchers warn.

“This is really the genie you can’t put back in the bottle,” Matthew Myers , the president of the nonprofit Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, told Business Insider.

 

Or put back in the e-cig either.


Our Mistake: Boston Globe Ran News Brief on BPL

August 3, 2018

Our eyes are obviously getting worse. Contrary to our last post, the Boston Globe did run an item about the Boston Public Library suspensions of three administrators under mysterious circumstances, smack in the middle of yesterday’s Metro Minute page.

 

 

In our defense, we had to go to the epaper to find it in the search engine – the website search engine produce endless pages of links to any article with “Boston” in it.

Our apologies all around.


Boston Globe Overdue on BPL Suspension Story

August 3, 2018

Yesterday it was front-page news in the Boston Herald.

 

 

The scoop from Herald reporter Sean Philip Cotter.

Library talk hushed

Authorities mum on ‘personnel matter’

The Boston Police Department is “reviewing” a “personnel matter” at the Boston Public Library — while City Hall and the BPL remain tight-lipped about why three administrators have been placed on unpaid leave.

BPL spokeswoman Lisa Pollack confirmed that the library had referred “a matter” to the police, but refused to elaborate.

“As this issue remains pending, we can not comment any further,” Pollack told the Herald.

 

Columnist Joe Battenfeld also checked in, urging Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to “intervene to get to the bottom of the mini-scandal before it gets out of control or buried by BPL management.”

Today the firsty local tabloid ran this editorial.

Boston Public Library should be open book

More than ever it is crucial that government institutions show complete transparency in their day-to-day operations.

That is why it is concerning that the Boston Public Library has placed three managers on unpaid administrative leave and no one is saying why. There is an internal investigation underway. Additionally, the BPL has referred “a matter” to the police but library spokeswoman Lisa Pollack refused to elaborate.

 

Also not weighing in: The Boston Globe.

We get it that no news organization wants to play caboose to another. But c’mon, Globeniks – time to circulate some BPL news of your own.