Boston Herald Is Your Hemp Gummies Headquarters

November 20, 2018

The hardreading staff is guessing its no coincidence that today’s edition of the tokey local tabloid . . .

 

 

. . . features this ad on page 17.

 

 

But, kids! – make sure you read the fine print.

That’s right: There’s no THC in Hemp Gummies – just hemp.

See here for further details.

And watch the Herald for more ads like the one above.

P.S. The Boston Globe just launched its Marijuana vertical. We’ll see if the Herald follows suit.

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No Drag: It’s Stoned Driving Day in the Boston Rags!

August 9, 2018

It will come as no surprise to alert readers of the local dailies that the two could attend the same event – yesterday’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over – and emerge with radically different angles on the drugged driving initiative. For the Boston Globe, the story is prevention; for the Boston Herald, it’s enforcement. Who woulda thunk?

Start with the State Street Sobriety Squad, for whom Dan Adams filed this report.

Mass. rolls out new ad warning of danger of driving stoned

 

With the debut of recreational marijuana sales imminent, Massachusetts safety officials on Wednesday unveiled a new television ad warning consumers against driving under the drug’s influence.

The 30-second spot, dubbed “The Roads You Take,” is meant to discourage driving while stoned, drunk, or impaired by other drugs.

It features a diverse group of people walking toward the camera and solemnly intoning fragmentary phrases: “There are roads — the ones you take, the ones you don’t. There are laws. There are rules. And there’s you — you driving; you drunk driving; you driving high; you stoned and driving; you spinning, crashing; you arrested; you killing,” before concluding, “there are roads, and then there are just dead ends.”

 

Here’s the TV spot in the $280,000 ad buy.

 

 

Meanwhile, crosstown on Fargo Street Mary Markos filed this (police) report.

STATIES SWAB VS. STONERS

Authorities seek Breathalyzer equivalent for pot

State police — expecting a surge in drugged driving now that pot is legal, and looking for a way to prove a driver is high — are finalizing a test of swabs they administered on about 170 people at roadside sobriety checks and a drug treatment center.

The Massachusetts State Police assessment is part of a nationwide effort by police to deal with the lack of chemical tests for drug intoxication comparable to Breathalyzers that are used to measure drunkenness. Legal experts say any chemical test is likely to face challenges in court.

 

They’re both good, informative pieces that reflect the beauty of a two-paper town: The safely local broadsheet vs. the tokey local tabloid.

Read ’em and beep.


Boston Herald (Pot)Head and Shoulders Above Globe

September 16, 2016

We tend to think of the Boston Herald as the town’s stern grandpa, holding everyone to the straight and narrow. While the Herald continues to be narrow, though, it’s not always straight. The tokey local tabloid features this full-page ad from Boston Smoke Shop in today’s edition.

 

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The ad fails to mention where and when the Boston Freedom Rally will occur (Saturday and Sunday on the Boston Common), but that’s weed for you.

Meanwhile, not high but in high dudgeon is the Herald editorial page, which weighs in with this bit of pearl-clutching.

Pot limits in order

Secretary of Transportation Stephanie Pollack is right — Massachusetts needs a reliable test to determine whether a driver is impaired by marijuana. And if Question 4 passes, legalizing the recreational use of pot, the importance of developing such a test will be even more important.

“One of the concerns with marijuana is, it is clear at some point, you are impaired legally, but we don’t have a test like we do for alcohol,” Pollack said on Boston Herald Radio this week.

There is an interim step that Beacon Hill could take — and frankly already should have taken. They could make it illegal to drive while in possession of marijuana, as it is with an open container of alcohol.

 

And remember: It’s against the law to smoke anything on the Common. Not to get technical about it.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, there’s no Boston Smoke Shop ad, but there is this pot headline on Page One: “Colorado serves edible marijuana with a side of controversy.” And brownies you can eat on the Common.