Globe, Herald Are Tied in Slapping NHL ‘Loser Point’

January 15, 2017

It’s always pleasant when the scribes align at the two Boston dailies, and today is one of those instances. The point of agreement? The NHL system of awarding two points to the winner of an overtime game and one to the loser.

The loser point.

The Boston Globe’s Kevin Paul Dupont and the Boston Herald’s Stephen Harris crosscheck the league’s overtime policy as a leading cause of the stunning amount of mediocre hockey currently on display in NHL games. Under the headline “NHL’s ‘loser point’ never a winning idea,” Dupont writes:

Its existence routinely makes the game action worse, detracts from the entertainment factor, part of a much broader struggle in a sport where the E-factor has taken humongous hits in recent years with the near-eradication of fighting and the lack of goal scoring.

The problem is, coaches coach to the loser point, something not seen in any other sport. And for good reason. It’s awful.

 

Harris doesn’t like the loser point any better. But he notes the possibility of adopting the European soccer and hockey approach.

•    In games decided in regulation, the winner receives three points, the loser gets zero.

•    A team that wins in overtime of any sort — sudden-death or shootout — earns two points.

•    The team that loses in extra time gets one point.

Just imagine the value of wins in regulation — and the motivation that would provide for players to give their all, and not simply hang on until OT.

 

Maybe . . . depending on the standings, yeah?

But Dupont’s not buying it: “One common remedy offered to prevent such third-period “failure to engage” would be to award 3 points for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss. Count me out, if only on the basis of muddling through the already confusing standings.”

How about this: Two points for an overtime win, no points for an overtime loss. You know – old school. Just a thought.


NBC Boston Spans the Globe (But Not the Herald) II

January 8, 2017

The new TV kid in town has once again wrapped itself around the Boston Globe while stealing the Boston Herald’s lunch money.

This week’s wrapper is similar to the one that ran last Sunday, with the two skinny panels being slightly different.

 

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The two full pages, however, are the same.

 

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Meanwhile, NBC Boston’s heralding continues to be largely Heraldless (the lone exception, as far as we could tell, was a one-third page ad last Tuesday). You would think Channel Everywhere would at least throw an ad into the Sunday Sports section, maybe in the football pages.

But no. Instead, there’s this:

 

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That’s brilliant – can’t you just see that meeting?

“Chester- we need a half-page house ad for B17!”

“How about this one, Boss – our football fans love a good party photo.”

Yeesh.

No wonder the dotty local tabloid can’t get any ad love.


NBC Boston Spans the Globe (But Not the Herald)

January 2, 2017

As the hardwatching staff has noted, the new NBC Boston (not to be confused with the old NBC Boston owned by arch nemesis Ed Ansin) has an uphill climb to establish itself in the local market.

For starters, there are the 20 – count ’em, 20 – different dial positions the new NBC Boston occupies, as this recent Boston Globe ad enumerated.

 

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That’s not broadcasting. That’s Sudoku.

Not to mention, as we previously mentioned:

First off, check out the over-the-air options available to what used to be called “cable decliners”: 8.1, 60.2, 60.5.

Seriously?

Those are the same people who have a VCR flashing 12:00 . . . 12:00 . . . 12:00 . . .

You think they can find Channel 60.5?

 

Regardless, yesterday was the official launch of NBC Boston, which the new enterprise marked by purchasing the Globe’s home delivery plastic bag, as well as wrapping the paper with an ad that included two skinny panels:

 

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And two full pages:

 

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Today NBC Boston got a sort of gift with purchase from the Globe: This front-page Don Aucoin piece.

As NBC preens, WHDH regroups

The muscle-flexing — or perhaps I should say feather-preening, since we’re talking about the Peacock Network — began early Sunday morning as NBC Boston made its debut. And it never really let up.

NBC’s mission: to convince the audience its programs are so popular that viewers will not only embrace its decision not to renew its affiliate agreement with WHDH-TV (Channel 7) but will also follow NBC to its new spot, with its own identity in the Boston TV market.

 

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, Aucoin’s analysis is no puff piece, as he addresses the challenges facing both NBC Boston and NBC’s ex, WHDH. He also details NBC Boston’s marketing flurry yesterday, from “saturating its airwaves with pointed reminders” of the network’s switch to “a daylong stream of ads spotlighting NBC stars.”

Interestingly, the piece does not mention the major ad bucks that went to the Globe itself.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, meanwhile, NBC Boston has . . . been dark, running not a single ad to guide Herald readers through the numbers salad the new station is serving up.

Hey, NBCniks: Herald readers watch TV too, you know.


How a Two-Daily Town Works (Tito Jackson Edition)

January 2, 2017

Anatomy of a Local News Cycle

On Thursday, this Meghan E. Irons piece appeared on BostonGlobe.com.

In year-end note, Jackson makes his case to Boston

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City Councilor Tito Jackson, who is considering a run for mayor, has posted a polished, well-laid-out case for himself on social media, articulating his 2016 accomplishments.

The message, complete with glossy pictures of the councilor talking to students, rallying crowds, and holding a bullhorn at City Hall, was not specifically addressed to residents in District 7, which he has represented since 2011. Instead it was directed at the entire city.

“Dear Boston,’’ reads Jackson’s message, which appears on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. “It has been an eventful year for us all.”

 

With possibly an even more eventful one to come, if Jackson takes on Boston mayor Marty Walsh.

Then, as surely as day follows night, here came Friday’s Boston Herald, Page One.

 

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The story inside:

More signs Tito to take on Marty

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Operatives working for City Councilor Tito Jackson have registered the website titojacksonformayor.com and have drafted the campaign manager for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, further proof the Roxbury pol is gearing up to take on Mayor Martin J. Walsh next year.

Jackson also just posted a flashy “Dear Boston” online message to supporters citywide — pushed out on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram — outlining what could be his platform for running for mayor . . .

Jackson, the District 7 councilor, has said he’s considering a challenge to Walsh and has increased his campaign fundraising and spending over the past several months.

 

Great sidebar: Bill Hyers, the aforementioned campaign manager for Bill de Blasio, is a partner at the political consulting firm Hilltop Public Solutions.

But . . .

Hyers is officially “moonlighting” for Jackson, since Hilltop’s New England office is “firmly in Walsh’s camp for the upcoming election,” according to the Herald.

Bring a food taster to their next office party, eh?

(Other Tito takes in Friday’s pushy local tabloid: A sidebar headlined From the ‘Dear Boston’ letter, and Hillary Chabot’s column Trump could give councilor a boost.)

Follow-up on the Tito Watch in Friday’s Globe: Uh . . . no.

So . . .  on to Saturday’s editions.

Once again the Herald was on Tito like Brown on Williamson, devoting all of page 5 to teeing Tito up (Inexplicable Little Green Numbers sold separately).

 

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Crosstown at Saturday’s Globe: Still no.

So . . . on to Sunday’s editions.

The fading local tabloid featured only this 2017 prediction in a column by Boston Herald Radio yakker John Sapochetti.

• Mayor Martin J. Walsh will narrowly win his re-election bid over Tito Jackson.

 

Crosstown at Sunday’s Globe: Even more no.

So . . . today’s editions.

Tito stories in toto: Zero.

See ya next cycle.


David M. Jrolf Fondly Remembered in Boston Dailies

December 29, 2016

It’s a rare thing when the local dailies actually align, but yesterday’s lovely crosstown sendoff of David M. Jrolf was one of them.

He was, as the unsigned Boston Herald obit stated, “a respected journalist and beloved editor at the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald.”

 

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Bryan Marquand’s Boston Globe obit was equally generous.

 

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The Herald:

Boston Herald Managing Editor for Production James Potter said Mr. Jrolf was “the consummate professional as the Herald’s Page One editor and head of the news copy desk” in the early 1990s.

“He was a hard-driving boss who pushed everyone on the copy desk to be better,” Potter said. “He had a presence that commanded attention. He knew the stories inside and out. We called him ‘The Giant Newsman,’ which was a moniker not only for his size, but for his great ability to stay up on all news, local, national and international.

“He demanded that we immerse ourselves in the news and it made us all better journalists,” Potter said.

 

The Globe:

The night Princess Diana died in Paris in 1997, Mr. Jrolf had left to go home just before the news broke late one Saturday. Michael Larkin, the Globe’s former deputy managing editor for news operations, was on the phone trying to get reporters to Paris “when I looked up and Dave was walking back into the room. I don’t know whether he heard it on the radio or what. He knew everyone would be needed, and he was there.

“He sat down, turned on his computer and worked with me until 4 o’clock Sunday morning,” Larkin added. “I’ll never forget it. That was one of the most magnanimous gestures. But that was Dave. He wanted to be in on the big stories. He just loved journalism.”

 

And, clearly, journalists loved him.


Globe Columnist Ignores Herald’s Ayla Brown Scoop

December 26, 2016

TO: Boston Globe columnist Renée Graham

FROM: The hardreading staff

RE: Your Sunday op-ed

First, we hasten to stipulate that we yield to no man in our professional respect for Boston Globe chinstroker Renée Graham.

However . . .

We must needs take issue with her latest piece in the Boston Sunday Globe.

Musicians lead the resistance

Nobody wants to play with Donald Trump.

Or, to be more precise, no one wants to play for Trump. Less than a month before his inauguration, the president-elect and his minions are flapping about trying to convince somebody — anybody — to perform at his various inaugural events. Last week, pop-opera tenor Andrea Bocelli declined Trump’s invitation after some of the singer’s fans threatened to boycott his concerts and albums if he sang a single note at the inauguration.

Bocelli’s refusal joins snubs from Elton John, Garth Brooks, and Celine Dion. So far, no A-list performers are willing to do anything that might suggest support for Trump, especially on a day he likely views more as a coronation than a swearing-in. Mark the moment: This is the first perceptible proof of life for an anti-Trump resistance that has been more bark than bite since Election Day. This is a silent but effective protest from artists usually thrilled to make a joyful noise.

 

Graham adds this: “So far, Trump has booked Jackie Evancho, a 16-year-old former “America’s Got Talent” runner-up, and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the latter somehow feeling like yet another swipe at Mitt Romney.”

That’s all well and good.

But what Ms. Graham fails to note is Saturday’s Boston Herald front page.

 

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Ayla, of course, is the daughter of former U.S. Sen. Scott Brown (R-Scott Brown), who is currently jockeying to head the Department of Veterans Affairs.

(We’ll pass over in silence that every other candidate for the post is far more qualified than Brown.)

Regardless, an offer from a 2006 American Idol round-of-16er is something the Trump inauguration team – or Renée Graham – should hardly ignore.

In our humble opinion.


Herald Gets Top Billing in Globe Re: ‘Patriots Day’

December 22, 2016

Patriots Day, the latest production from the Wahlberg-industrial complex, is turning into the ultimate Boston Rorschach test.

Exhibit Umpteen: This tweet from the estimable David Bernstein.

 

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The Sean Burns review in NorthShoreMovies David cited includes this:

Before the closing credits roll, “Patriots Day” tacks on almost ten minutes of interview footage from some of the story’s real-life subjects, all of them offering canned aphorisms that sound over-rehearsed. It feels like a pre-emptive bid for exoneration by the filmmakers, proof they got permission to cash in on a city’s still-tender memories in order to massage the ego of their superstar producer. Without this documentary material, the movie would have ended on a shot of David Ortiz shaking Mark Wahlberg’s hand, the real slugger thanking the fake cop for his heroic service.

 

Ouch.

Here’s another pinprick: On G5 of Wednesday’s Boston Globe Food section, there’s this ad for “Patriots Day.”

 

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And check out who gets top billing.

 

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That’s right – the Herald’s Jim Verniere, who wrote in his review that “’Patriots Day’ is a film every American and anyone planning to do us harm should see.”

Crosstown, Globe movie critic Ty Burr – in that same Food section – said something quite different.

Peter Berg’s movie, starring Mark Wahlberg in an invented role, is neither great nor gawdawful. It’s professionally made, slickly heartfelt, and is offered up as an act of civic healing. At best, it’s unnecessary. At worst, it’s vaguely insulting.

 

Roll your own, splendid readers.