Boston TV Dress Coda: Ties Clipped at NECN/NBC10

October 22, 2018

Well the hardreading staff was perusing the Sunday papers yesterday when we came across a startling sartorial item in the Boston Globe’s Names column, which actually recycled the story so we’ll reference Kevin Slane’s original piece on Boston.com.

A local TV station just got a new dress code

If you’ve been watching NECN recently, you may have noticed something missing. Male anchors in the studio have done away with the tie, a longtime staple of business attire.

The new dress code, implemented by NECN news director Ben Dobson, officially went into effect last week. Other NBC-owned stations in the region, including NBC10 Boston and Telemundo, plan to adopt the tie-less look, too.

 

Loosen the knot graf:

“Dobson said the move to ditch the neckwear is an effort to mirror its viewers, whom he believes are less likely to wear ties on a daily basis thanks to evolving workplace dress codes.”

Seriously? So maybe doctors should wear jeans and Patriots jerseys? Or lawyers could wear Lululemon to court? What the hell.

Back in the 1920s and ’30s, the BBC made radio announcers wear dinner jackets. In the U.S. at that time, announcers and performers wore tuxedos and gowns. It was a sign of respect for the listeners, even though they couldn’t see the broadcasters.

But that’s so old school. It’s clearly better to be personable than professional now, according to Audrey Mansfield, visual stylist for NBC-owned stations. She told Slane, “On set, they’ll still be wearing a nice shirt and full suit. They’ll still have a very nice collar, and be very well-groomed. It is one piece of clothing we are taking away.”

Except it’s more than just a necktie. At least to some of us old fogies.

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Boston Herald Advertises Result of Its Brutal Layoffs

October 7, 2018

Our kissin’ cousins at One-Daily Town noted this the other day, but it bears repeating in this space: Since Digital Fist – sorry, First – Media bought the shaky local tabloid, the paper has gone from 225 employees to roughly 100, with the newsroom barely able to field a softball team.

And the lost jobs are not being outsourced as much as insourced – moved to other parts of the Digital First conglomerate.

So, for instance, the Herald’s copy editing is now done in Denver, as the Boston Globe’s Jon Chesto noted on Friday.

Much of the copy editing work heads to DFM employees in Denver, and ad sales increasingly will be handled out of Lowell, where DFM owns the Lowell Sun.

 

Some of the ad sales, however, are migrating to another DFM division – Denver-based Adtaxi – as this house ad indicates.

 

 

Adtaxi is a clearinghouse for ad placement and describes itself with gobbledygook like this:

“Taking an omnichannel approach, Adtaxi offers a true full-funnel solution powered by our intelligent optimization technology, Quantum, that drives performance to the conversion metrics that matter most to your business.”

 

As the sadreading staff at One-Daily Town said, “A Herald sales rep wouldn’t be caught dead talking like that. But a dead paper walking? Sure.”

Two postscripts:

1) From our Irony Deficient Herald desk

Yesterday’s shrinky local tabloid not only ran the Adtaxi ad, but also featured this AP story: “Jobless rate lowest since ’69.”

Except at the Herald, of course.

2) Also from our Irony Deficient Herald desk

The sketchy local tabloid has been running this small house ad almost every day for the past few weeks.

 

 

Except at the Herald, of course.


Columbia Gas: No One in Lawrence Reads the Herald

October 4, 2018

Columbia Gas, which oversaw the destruction of roughly 80 homes; the death of Leonel Rondon, a student at Phoenix Charter Academy; over two dozen injuries; and the disruption of thousands of other lives, promises to restore service to Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover by November 19th.

But . . .

The company is also hedging its bets, as yesterday’s full-page Boston Globe ad from Columbia Gasbag Joe Hamrock indicates.

 

 

Nuts to deadlines graf.

 

 

Notice first that Columbia Gas is outsourcing part of its responsibility for the recovery to “local, state and federal officials and other dedicated people and organizations.”

Also notice that there’s no mention of the November 19th deadline.

Also also notice that the ad did not run in the Boston Herald, yet another example of Boston institutions overlooking the thirsty local tabloid.

No wonder we’re destined to be a One-Daily Town.

P.S. It’s entirely coincidental that this is the front page of today’s Herald

 

 

and this is Metro Page One of the Globe.

 

 

 

Entirely.


Hark! The Herald! (Trusted? Better Verify Edition)

September 28, 2018

Latest in our endless series from the selfie local tabloid

As the hardreading staff was leafing through our New! Costlier! Boston Herald this morning, we came across this small house ad on page 9.

 

 

Who knew, right?

(To be sure graf goes here.)

To be sure, we have, on occasion, been wary of trusting the pluggy local tabloid regarding such matters, so we decided to check out that Brand Keys outfit, and here’s what we found.

A recent Brand Keys study measured “trust” among readers of their newspapers-of-choice.

Sure, ideology self-defines selection when it comes to subscribing to a newspaper (in print or digital), but “Trust” accounts for 41% of actual newspaper brand engagement.

The remaining 59% is accounted for by content and values addressing “entertainment listings and sports,” “an ability to educate and inform via news reporting, columnists, and editorial,” and providing insights into the “economy and local events and markets.”

 

The study asked 3800 readers – either print subscribers or regular digital readers (3+ times a week) – to evaluate their newspapers.

Drumroll, please.

 

 

Given its perhaps unlikely presence on the list, you can understand the chants of “We’re Number Twelve!” echoing around Fargo Street.

But when you think about it, 18% of regular Herald readers don’t trust the paper; of course, that’s also true of 14% of Boston Globe readers.

Maybe they should crisscross.


Boston Globe Indulges Sean O’Malley’s Cardinal Sin

September 11, 2018

The rumpus over Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley’s shoddy mail handling features a new chapter today, and the coverage in the Boston dailies finds them in the same church, very different pews.

Start with story placement. The Boston Herald goes dead-center front page.

 

 

The Boston Globe goes Metro Page One below the fold (and totally buries the story on BostonGlobe.com).

 

 

Inside, the Herald gives the story two full pages.

 

 

The Globe gives it an 11-paragraph jump. And no critics of O’Malley show up until the seventh of them.

[The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors] members are “trying to make the church the very safest place possible,” O’Malley said.

Mitchell Garabedian, a Boston lawyer who has represented many clergy sex abuse victims, was unmoved by O’Malley’s remarks.

“The Catholic Church, with its miserable history of covering up clergy sexual abuse, fails to admit that clergy sexual abuse must be investigated before it can be properly prevented,” Garabedian said Monday in a statement. “The Catholic Church’s failure to investigate clergy sexual abuse is just meant to continue the wholesale cover up of the abuse.”

 

Was unmoved? In Mary Markos’s Herald piece, Garabedian fairly blowtorches Church leaders.

“It is not credible, not reasonable to believe the leaders of the Catholic Church — the very entity which participated in sexual abuse and its cover-up — is now going to prevent sexual abuse and cover-up in the future,” Garabedian said. “Not only that, they don’t know how to prevent sexual abuse, they’ve shown through their actions that they really don’t care about preventing sexual abuse.”

 

Just an average day in a two-daily town.


Boston Globe Redesigns Nameless Names Column

September 6, 2018

As you splendid readers might – or might not – have noticed, former Boston Globe Names stalwarts Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein were deleted from the sort-of gossip column several months ago. Last known sighting was June 18.

 

 

After that, the column had this stripped-down look.

 

 

Until yesterday, that is, when Names got a bit of a facelift.

 

 

Most of the content has been outsourced to Boston.com writers, chief among them Kevin Slane. Nice chance to make a name for himself.

Meanwhile, memo to Boston Herald Track Gal Olivia Vanni: Now’s the time to hit up your bosses for a fall makeover, no?


Boston Herald’s New E-Edition: E Stands for Exit

September 5, 2018

The Not-So-Boston Herald has, over the past handful of months, 1) moved its printing from the Boston Globe’s Taunton press to the Providence Journal’s plant in Rhode Island, and 2) announced the paper’s move from Fargo Street to Braintree later this year.

Despite the Herald’s sunny-side-up promotion of its new printing press (“our loyal customers can look forward to a more reader-friendly paper”) and new home (Free parking! Convenient shopping! On-site Leanbox (whatever the hell that is)! Amenities! Miles from Boston!), it sure doesn’t feel like good news.

But this – which hit our email in-box last evening – sure does.

Here’s our question: Is the hardreading staff eligible to win? (We’re guessing not, since no one at the feisty local tabloid can stand us.)

Anyway, here’s the new format.

 

 

Not to get technical about it, but that was the E-Edition at 12:10 this morning, which seemed a bit, well, out of step.

(It’s all sorted now, though, as my morning E-Editon email informed me. Oddly, the print edition of the slightly local tabloid had no mention of the new digital paper. It also lacked last night’s baseball scores. The E-Edition, at least, had some but not all. Stick that in your email, eh?)