Hark! The Herald! (More Internet Radio Edition)

July 30, 2013

From our Walt Whitman desk

Hey, kids! Mark your calendars! It’s Day Two of the Great Herald Radio Countdown.

As the hardreading staff noted yesterday, the Boston Herald devoted two full pages of Monday’s edition to the gala announcement of an Internet radio stream that will debut next week. What we neglected to mention, however, was that one-half of Monday’s Page One was devoted to the glad tidings.

 

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And they’re no less glad today.

 

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Once again, the feisty local tabloid also devotes two full pages to promoting the new venture.

 

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(The e in the Herald’s e-edition must stand for erratic, since those little green numbers pop up entirely at random.)

Anyway, here’s our choice for Plug o’ the Day:

 

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No shit, Sherlock.  The Herald just spent two pages of what they laughably call the newshole telling us exactly that.

P.S. Crosstown at the Boston Globe, the Names column has this plug for RadioBDC, the Globe’s Internet ghost of the nearly departed WFNX.

 

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Be interesting to see if some news/talk shows start turning up on the indie rockstream.

 

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Hark! The Herald! (Internet Radio Edition)

July 30, 2013

From our Walt Whitman desk

Say, that’s some big news about the feisty local tabloid launching Boston Herald Radio, yeah?

All the details were, well, detailed in the Herald Radio Countdown that ran in Monday’s edition:

072513radiojfm06Herald internet radio to get Boston connected

The Herald is poised to take a dramatic step toward a richer experience for its online audience as it launches a new Internet radio station.

The countdown has begun for 6 a.m. next Monday, Aug. 5, when Boston Herald Radio goes live.

Veteran talk show host Jeff Katz will launch a morning drive news talk show that will lead into 12 hours of live broadcasting each weekday.

There will be four shows in all, including “Live from the Newsroom with Jeff Katz,” “Morning Meeting with Jaclyn Cashman and Hillary Chabot,” “The Michael Graham Show” and “Sports Town with Jon 
Meterparel and Jen Royle.”

 

In other words, the usual Herald suspects.

But let’s focus on the big picture:

 

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Note especially the hostage-like statements from local politicians.

U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy 3.0:

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Gov. Deval Patrick:

 

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Truly, the hardreading staff can’t wait for the August 5 debut.

 


Boston Editorial Cartoonists Enter WeinerWorld

July 26, 2013

Boston is blessed not only with two daily newspapers, but with two very talented editorial cartoonists: Dan Wasserman at the Boston Globe, and Jerry Holbert at the Boston Herald.

(You can count on two hands the number of daily newspapers nationally that employ editorial cartoonists. And yes, technically Wasserman may be a syndicated cartoonist rather than a Globe staffer, but his drawings still have a Globe identity.)

In Thursday’s editions, the two coincidentally visited Six Flags Over Anthony Weiner.

Holbert:

 

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Wasserman:

 

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Smart, as usual.


On Mayoral Race, Local Dailies Get into Business Together

July 24, 2013

Well, the Boston mayoral candidates released their campaign finance reports for the second quarter and darned if the local dailies didn’t notice the same thing: No bucks yet from the big-bucks set.

Boston Herald:

Jack Connors for the Shattuck AwardBusiness elite wait for the herd to thin

From businessman Jack Connors to developer John Fish to Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino, Patriots owner Robert Kraft and concessionaire Joseph O’Donnell, many of the city’s top power brokers are playing it safe in the mayor’s race — but leaving the crowded field of candidates hanging in the balance at a crucial time in the election.

A Herald review of the latest campaign finance reports found that Connors, Fish, Lucchino, Kraft and O’Donnell have yet to contribute to any of the dozen candidates running to replace Mayor Thomas M. Menino.

Also sitting on the sidelines so far are Putnam Investments CEO Robert Reynolds, Hill Holliday CEO Karen Kaplan, State Street Bank’s Jay Hooley, Suffolk Downs chief Richard Fields, Celtics owner and venture capitalist Stephen Pagliuca, Red Sox co-owner John Henry and former John Hancock Insurance CEO David D’Alessandro.

 

As the feisty local tabloid points out, all of the above are subject to the $500 maximum contribution per candidate, “but they also boast the extensive contacts to organize fundraisers that can bundle tens of thousands of dollars in donations at a single pop.”

Popping crosstown to the Boson Globe, newly minted Business columnist Shirley Leung devotes her maiden voyage to the same topic – and pretty much the same names.

leung_colorBusinesses watching mayoral race from sidelines

If you are a serious candidate for mayor, you have driven past the scrubby warehouses of Newmarket Square, to the headquarters of Suffolk Construction, for an audience with CEO John Fish.

And when you arrive, expect a surprise. Fish, an unofficial kingmaker in Boston, told me he’s in no rush to support anyone — not with his time, not with his money. Will he ever? “Time will tell,” Fish explained.

He’s not the only one disappointing candidates this season.

Many of Boston’s business elites are sitting on the sidelines in the first truly open mayoral election in 30 years. It would be unfair to call them apathetic. Their doors are open to candidates and they’re following the issues, but their wallets are closed and their BMWs are free of bumper stickers.

 

(Wait – 30 years? What happened to the eight-way donnybrook in 1993?)

What sets Leung’s piece apart, though, is her inclusion of some bigwigs who have ponied up at this stage:

Not everyone is abstaining, even if they are not exactly revealing their support. Boston developer Ronald Druker is doing his best impression of a high roller at a Vegas roulette table, betting the maximum $500 each on Felix Arroyo, Dan Conley, John Connolly, Rob Consalvo, and Mike Ross, according to state campaign filings.

“I may ultimately give to some more,” said Druker.

Developer Joseph Fallon, who is building out the Fan Pier office and condo complex in the Seaport District, gave $500 in May to Conley, the Suffolk district attorney, and raised another $30,000 for him. Fallon also contributed $500 to Consalvo’s campaign this month and has given to Marty Walsh’s run.

 

One final note: Both papers also mention  the Vault, a “cabal of executives” who engaged in a very high level of backroom politics for decades. The Vault was to mayoral elections in the ’50s and ’60s what the money primary is now. May the best (financed) man or woman win!

UPDATE: The hardreading staff didn’t read hard enough. The Herald also mentioned the developers who have coughed up dough to several candidates.

 

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Apologies all around.


Local Dailies Trash The Vineyard

July 23, 2013

Well, actually, The Vineyard.

That’s the new unreality show that debuts tonight on ABC Family.

 

Here’s what the cable channel says about it:

ABC Family’s newest original docu-series, The Vineyard , is set against the idyllic backdrop of Martha’s Vineyard, MA, and features the island’s iconic Black Dog Tavern. The series follows a mix of locals and transplants living and playing together for the summer. Rounding out the cast of seven girls and four guys is a Latin pop princess, a hopeless romantic and a pre-med student, just to name a few. It’s sure to be an intriguing combination of new friends, new rivals and tight quarters, all resulting in a summer of trouble and romance.

 

Except . . here’s what the TV critics at the local dailies say about it.

Mark Perigard in the Boston Herald:

JACKIE LYONS, KATIE TARDIF, GABBY LAPOINTE‘Vineyard’ dim bulbs are biggest losers

ABC’s new “unscripted” series “The Vineyard” — set in Martha’s Vineyard — has a lot in common with the CBS hit summer drama “Under the Dome.”

Both shows feature people in a tight geographical area. One features people behaving unspeakably stupidly and vile, the other is based on a Stephen King novel.

 

Shouldn’t that be “vilely”? Funny you ask – the Boston Globe’s Matthew Gilbert says, not really.

On some reality shows, the characters seem partly real and partly the creations of the director; on “The Vineyard,” the characters seem almost entirely designed by the director, as if the cast members have been given extremely precise instructions. Katie and the oh-so-chivalrous and ab-tastic Lou are going to be the romantically tortured “A” story.23vineyard2

OK, I have to be transparent. I just went to Thesaurus.com and searched for “repulsive,” and right now I’m feeling overwhelmed by the number of appropriate choices I have to round out my final thoughts on “The Vineyard.” “Odious” is good, but maybe a little too sniffy; there’s no point in being sniffy about a show so obviously rigged to be vapid. “Vile,” too, is an overreaction. I mean, these people are so flat and unreal, it’s pointless to waste sharp words on them. Ah well, even “repulsive” won’t do. I’ll stick with “hollow” and “generic” and get out.

 

Of course you’re wondering: Will the hardreading staff be watching tonight’s premiere?

Get out.


Local Dailies Have Mo Sports Coverage

July 22, 2013

The Boston Sunday papers feature – hold on now – very similar takes on New York Yankee immortal Mariano Rivera, who’s been on a unique farewell tour in this his final season.

Peter Abraham piece from the Boston Sunday Globe:

Yankees’ Mariano Rivera ending career in style

Retiring Yankees great Rivera meeting with special groups at every ballpark he visits

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Mariano Rivera played his first game at Fenway Park on July 16, 1996. He was a setup reliever then and pitched two innings against the Red Sox. Joe Girardi, who manages the Yankees now, was the catcher.

John Basmajian can’t remember for sure, but he probably was at the game that day. The guy everybody at Fenway calls “Baz” has been working at the park for 46 years selling tickets.

In the years since, surely their paths crossed. If you count the postseason, Rivera has walked into Fenway Park more than any ballpark other than Yankee Stadium. Baz? He’s as much a part of Fenway as the Pesky Pole.

On Saturday, the two career baseball men finally met.

“Pretty special,” Basmajian said. “I’ve got tears in my eyes.”

 

Rivera is doing something special in his final run through the American League. “[H]e is holding small, informal meetings with people at every park he visits . . . It can be fans, team employees, or some combination of the two.”

Here’s a taste of what the Boston meeting was like:

After a brief introduction from [Yankees media relations director Jason] Zillo, Rivera led a discussion that lasted 40 minutes. He spoke softly at first then a little louder as he encouraged others to join in.

Rivera called all of the participants by name, too. People he had never met before and might never see again were treated with the respect he would show a teammate.

“It’s an honor for me to be here with you guys.” Rivera said. “First of all to say thank you. Thank you for all of you who are a part of baseball. I wanted to do something different. I wanted to be able to hear from people that we don’t see on the field. We see the people in the clubhouse and we see the people who work on the field, but we don’t see everybody who works behind the scenes who make baseball what it is.”

 

Among the group Rivera addressed were Jimmy Fund patients Harry Clark, “a 13-year-old from Wellesley who is visually impaired by an inoperable brain tumor,” and Fernando Morales, “a 19-year-old from Norwood who had to give up his sport, soccer, because of Ewing’s sarcoma.”

Rivera’s tender interactions with the two speak volumes about the man.

Crosstown, Sunday’s Boston Herald front page featured this bromantic swoon:

 

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Michael Silverman piece:

072013soxmh02Closer to reality

Mariano Rivera brings goodwill tour to Fenway meeting

For one day at least, Mariano Rivera made the whole Red Sox-Yankees rivalry look silly.

Rivera, the most respected player of his generation and the best closer in the history of his sport, spread his brand of love and kindness all over the Red Sox and Fenway Park yesterday . . .

His pregame visit took place in a Fenway suite where fans — young and old, some with cancer, victims of the Boston Marathon bombings — along with longtime Fenway employees sat in a semicircle around the 43-year-old Rivera, who was dressed in his Yankees batting-practice uniform.

His greeting was essentially his thanks to them for being there.

 

As the Globe piece noted, the Boston fans thanked him right back.

The fans at Fenway gave Rivera a standing ovation when he came out of the bullpen to pitch the ninth inning. He picked up the save as the Yankees won, 5-2.

“I appreciate this place,” Rivera said. “To me, there is no rivalry. We all love baseball.”

 

And, clearly, we all love The Great Rivera.


Tsarnaev Photo Finish

July 21, 2013

Saturday’s local dailies had – wait for it – very different takes on the State Police photos of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s April 19 apprehension by law enforcement officials after a “massive manhunt.”

From the Boston Globe:

Some praise officer for bloody images

Sergeant with State Police faces hearing on action

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The State Police sergeant who released dramatic photos of the capture of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev without the agency’s permission received enthusiastic support Friday from an array of backers.

“The department received dozens upon dozens of calls and e-mails today from citizens around the country supporting Sergeant Murphy and what he did,” State Police spokesman David Procopio said Friday.

Sergeant Sean Murphy, who released the images of a bloody Tsarnaev to Boston Magazine Thursday, also drew praise on social media, including Twitter. He said he released the photos in response to Rolling Stone magazine’s putting Tsarnaev on its cover with an image that critics said made him look glamorous.

“Great photos,” one person wrote of Murphy’s images. “I support your decision.”

 

But not everyone felt the same way, as the Boston Herald’s front page noted:

 

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The inside scoop:

Dzhokhar TsarnaevDzhokhar’s dream photos?

Cop pics could help defense

The leaked state police photos of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s bloody, woozy capture and surrender in Watertown may be exactly the evidence the Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s legal team needs to help him talk his way out of the death chamber, a former federal prosecutor said yesterday.

“I absolutely think they’re going to be using these in terms of mitigation — that he’s been injured enough, that he suffered, that he was fired upon without firing upon the others,” attorney R. Bradford Bailey told the Herald. “These are the precise types of facts that make a persuasive argument against imposing the death penalty.

“This is certainly material for Judith Clarke and her experience with capital punishment cases,” he added, referring to the San Diego death-penalty specialist who has been appointed to Tsarnaev’s case.

 

This one is, as they say in the betting line, pick ’em.