Boston Herald for Sale, Price Is Right for Globe

October 28, 2018

When the costly local tabloid arrived at the Global Worldwide Headquarters this morning, the front page of Sunday Sports blared out this:

STAY ON SCHEDULE

Silverman: Red Sox stick to plan,

save Sale for Game 5

 

Said Michael Silverman piece ran on page 3.

 

 

Except . . . this Peter Abraham piece is more like it.

 

 

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, the Herald got it all sorted out eventually, as the paper’s website and E-Edition indicate. But that sure doesn’t help the lowly home subscriber, now does it?

Advertisements

Red Sox Don’t Appreciate Boston Herald Readers

September 20, 2015

As the Carmine Hose continue their pitched battle with Tampa Bay for fourth place in the American League East, the team has launched Fan Appreciation Week for the season’s final seven games.

(Fan Appreciation, of course, means We Appreciate Any Fannies We Can Put in Fenway.)

So the Red Sox ran this ad in today’s Boston Globe:

 

Screen Shot 2015-09-20 at 12.12.40 PM

 

First off, 1 final homestand? Is David Ortiz retiring? Or going elsewhere? Cause he sure doesn’t sound like it in this Peter Abraham wrap of yesterday’s dramatic win over the Blue Jays.

At 39, Ortiz is watching these final weeks of the season like a scout, hoping to see players who can form the core of a contending team before he retires.

 

Is the team trying to tell Ortiz something with this ad?

Regardless, the season’s final week, for those of you keeping score at home.

 

Screen Shot 2015-09-20 at 12.24.56 PM

 

That’s a lot of appreciating, eh?

Then again, they probably don’t appreciate it at the Boston Herald, which once again struck out in the advertising department.

Bobblehead Fever Grips Hub!

Just not at the thirsty local tabloid.


Local Dailies Have Mo Sports Coverage

July 22, 2013

The Boston Sunday papers feature – hold on now – very similar takes on New York Yankee immortal Mariano Rivera, who’s been on a unique farewell tour in this his final season.

Peter Abraham piece from the Boston Sunday Globe:

Yankees’ Mariano Rivera ending career in style

Retiring Yankees great Rivera meeting with special groups at every ballpark he visits

chin072013soxyanks_spt2

Mariano Rivera played his first game at Fenway Park on July 16, 1996. He was a setup reliever then and pitched two innings against the Red Sox. Joe Girardi, who manages the Yankees now, was the catcher.

John Basmajian can’t remember for sure, but he probably was at the game that day. The guy everybody at Fenway calls “Baz” has been working at the park for 46 years selling tickets.

In the years since, surely their paths crossed. If you count the postseason, Rivera has walked into Fenway Park more than any ballpark other than Yankee Stadium. Baz? He’s as much a part of Fenway as the Pesky Pole.

On Saturday, the two career baseball men finally met.

“Pretty special,” Basmajian said. “I’ve got tears in my eyes.”

 

Rivera is doing something special in his final run through the American League. “[H]e is holding small, informal meetings with people at every park he visits . . . It can be fans, team employees, or some combination of the two.”

Here’s a taste of what the Boston meeting was like:

After a brief introduction from [Yankees media relations director Jason] Zillo, Rivera led a discussion that lasted 40 minutes. He spoke softly at first then a little louder as he encouraged others to join in.

Rivera called all of the participants by name, too. People he had never met before and might never see again were treated with the respect he would show a teammate.

“It’s an honor for me to be here with you guys.” Rivera said. “First of all to say thank you. Thank you for all of you who are a part of baseball. I wanted to do something different. I wanted to be able to hear from people that we don’t see on the field. We see the people in the clubhouse and we see the people who work on the field, but we don’t see everybody who works behind the scenes who make baseball what it is.”

 

Among the group Rivera addressed were Jimmy Fund patients Harry Clark, “a 13-year-old from Wellesley who is visually impaired by an inoperable brain tumor,” and Fernando Morales, “a 19-year-old from Norwood who had to give up his sport, soccer, because of Ewing’s sarcoma.”

Rivera’s tender interactions with the two speak volumes about the man.

Crosstown, Sunday’s Boston Herald front page featured this bromantic swoon:

 

Picture 1

 

Michael Silverman piece:

072013soxmh02Closer to reality

Mariano Rivera brings goodwill tour to Fenway meeting

For one day at least, Mariano Rivera made the whole Red Sox-Yankees rivalry look silly.

Rivera, the most respected player of his generation and the best closer in the history of his sport, spread his brand of love and kindness all over the Red Sox and Fenway Park yesterday . . .

His pregame visit took place in a Fenway suite where fans — young and old, some with cancer, victims of the Boston Marathon bombings — along with longtime Fenway employees sat in a semicircle around the 43-year-old Rivera, who was dressed in his Yankees batting-practice uniform.

His greeting was essentially his thanks to them for being there.

 

As the Globe piece noted, the Boston fans thanked him right back.

The fans at Fenway gave Rivera a standing ovation when he came out of the bullpen to pitch the ninth inning. He picked up the save as the Yankees won, 5-2.

“I appreciate this place,” Rivera said. “To me, there is no rivalry. We all love baseball.”

 

And, clearly, we all love The Great Rivera.