Boston Globe Hits Red Sox with a Big Kayn Aynhoreh

August 7, 2018

Page One of today’s Boston Globe Sports section is the very definition of a jinx on the Red Sox.

 

 

Christopher Gasper’s column labeling the Red Sox “close to unbeatable” and the New York Yankees “feckless and fundamentally unsound” tiptoes right up to the hexing post. But Chad Finn’s confetti tossing puts a full-tilt whammy on the Olde Towne Team.

It’s all over but the accounting. For all intents and purposes, the Red Sox clinched their third straight AL East title Sunday night.

 

Kayn aynhoreh.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, the estimable Steve Buckley provides a more sober-minded perspective.

Put hold on celebration

Despite Sox’ big lead, anything possible

Such was the Red Sox’ annihilation of the Yankees this past weekend that the remainder of the regular season has been reduced to little more than a stretching exercise for October.

Right?

The Sox have wrapped up the American League East, leaving the humbled, hurtin’ Yankees and their fans to collect themselves and start planning for that scary one-and-done wild card game against the Oakland A’s or Seattle Mariners.

Right?

 

Not so fast, Buckley says.

Now there’s a man with respect for the evil eye.

Hey, the hardworking staff knows we’re a mere Made Yankee Fan in Boston. But we might also be the canary in the coal mine.

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Hub Dailies Bid #2 Adieu

September 28, 2014

It’s Sendoff Sunday for Yankee great Derek Jeter as he says so long to baseball and the Fenway Faithful. So it’s not surprising that the local dailies have some parting gifts for the splendid shortstop who, as far as we know, never got a nickname.

From the Boston Globe, it’s a bouquet of stats – Jeter’s career relative to the Red Sox. (On the web here, but graphics not really working.)

 

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Close-up of Jeter’s numbers:

 

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Nice, but a little cold and calculating.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, the sendoff is much warmer.

 

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And the feisty local tabloid goes into extra innings, as Track Gal Gayle Fee tracks Jeter’s dating average.

 

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Tip o’ the cap to the Herald on this one.


Boston Globe Leaves Sox Game Early

August 4, 2014

Well the hardreading staff opened up our costly home-delivered Boston Globe this morning and here’s what we found on Page One of the Sports section:

 

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Seriously? A thumbsucker on Clay Buchholz? All due respect to Nick Cafardo, but where the hell’s the game report?

Answer: In a later edition than the one we got this ayem.

Usually, it’s the Boston Herald that’s missing the action, but today the feisty local tabloid was on the money for a change. Back page:

 

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And it wasn’t just last night’s ballgame where the Globet was a day late.

From our Late to the Wedding Party desk comes this item from today’s Names column:

 

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Right, “as reported over the weekend” – IN THE BOSTON HERALD. ON PAGE ONE.

 

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New slogan for the late-ly local broadsheet: Half the News That’s Fit to Print.


Local Dailies Have Mo Sports Coverage

July 22, 2013

The Boston Sunday papers feature – hold on now – very similar takes on New York Yankee immortal Mariano Rivera, who’s been on a unique farewell tour in this his final season.

Peter Abraham piece from the Boston Sunday Globe:

Yankees’ Mariano Rivera ending career in style

Retiring Yankees great Rivera meeting with special groups at every ballpark he visits

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Mariano Rivera played his first game at Fenway Park on July 16, 1996. He was a setup reliever then and pitched two innings against the Red Sox. Joe Girardi, who manages the Yankees now, was the catcher.

John Basmajian can’t remember for sure, but he probably was at the game that day. The guy everybody at Fenway calls “Baz” has been working at the park for 46 years selling tickets.

In the years since, surely their paths crossed. If you count the postseason, Rivera has walked into Fenway Park more than any ballpark other than Yankee Stadium. Baz? He’s as much a part of Fenway as the Pesky Pole.

On Saturday, the two career baseball men finally met.

“Pretty special,” Basmajian said. “I’ve got tears in my eyes.”

 

Rivera is doing something special in his final run through the American League. “[H]e is holding small, informal meetings with people at every park he visits . . . It can be fans, team employees, or some combination of the two.”

Here’s a taste of what the Boston meeting was like:

After a brief introduction from [Yankees media relations director Jason] Zillo, Rivera led a discussion that lasted 40 minutes. He spoke softly at first then a little louder as he encouraged others to join in.

Rivera called all of the participants by name, too. People he had never met before and might never see again were treated with the respect he would show a teammate.

“It’s an honor for me to be here with you guys.” Rivera said. “First of all to say thank you. Thank you for all of you who are a part of baseball. I wanted to do something different. I wanted to be able to hear from people that we don’t see on the field. We see the people in the clubhouse and we see the people who work on the field, but we don’t see everybody who works behind the scenes who make baseball what it is.”

 

Among the group Rivera addressed were Jimmy Fund patients Harry Clark, “a 13-year-old from Wellesley who is visually impaired by an inoperable brain tumor,” and Fernando Morales, “a 19-year-old from Norwood who had to give up his sport, soccer, because of Ewing’s sarcoma.”

Rivera’s tender interactions with the two speak volumes about the man.

Crosstown, Sunday’s Boston Herald front page featured this bromantic swoon:

 

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Michael Silverman piece:

072013soxmh02Closer to reality

Mariano Rivera brings goodwill tour to Fenway meeting

For one day at least, Mariano Rivera made the whole Red Sox-Yankees rivalry look silly.

Rivera, the most respected player of his generation and the best closer in the history of his sport, spread his brand of love and kindness all over the Red Sox and Fenway Park yesterday . . .

His pregame visit took place in a Fenway suite where fans — young and old, some with cancer, victims of the Boston Marathon bombings — along with longtime Fenway employees sat in a semicircle around the 43-year-old Rivera, who was dressed in his Yankees batting-practice uniform.

His greeting was essentially his thanks to them for being there.

 

As the Globe piece noted, the Boston fans thanked him right back.

The fans at Fenway gave Rivera a standing ovation when he came out of the bullpen to pitch the ninth inning. He picked up the save as the Yankees won, 5-2.

“I appreciate this place,” Rivera said. “To me, there is no rivalry. We all love baseball.”

 

And, clearly, we all love The Great Rivera.


Hark! The Herald! (Preview Edition II)

April 1, 2013

From our Walt Whitman desk

The Boston Herald will be doing some celebrating itself and singing itself tomorrow, thanks to a return trip to The Newseum’s Top Ten Front Pages hit parade.

Opening Week

Look no further than today’s front pages to find out what time it is. Fields of dreams, players in action and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch‘s reliable weatherbird all provide the answer. For most papers, play ball means baseball. For the Press-Citizen, it means golf. The Daily Journal stands out not only for its baseball-themed nameplate, but for a cover story and graphic on growing old in prison.

 

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Note that both New York tabloids were hits, which is more than the Yankees can say about their home opener. Can’t wait to see the Big Town tabs tomorrow.


Who Hates the Yankees More: The Globe or The Herald?

October 19, 2012

As a Made Yankee Fan in Boston, the hardreading staff is entirely gobsmacked by the Chernobylesque meltdown of the Bronx Bummers in the ALCS.

The locals here in Boston – and the local dailies – are lovin’ it, of course. As well they should.

But which paper loves it more?

The Boston Globe throws this high hard one on page 3 of the Sports section:

Tigers complete sweep of Yankees

DETROIT — The Detroit Tigers didn’t simply sweep the New York Yankees out of baseball’s postseason on Thursday; they embarrassed them in every way one team can another.

An 8-1 victory in Game 4 of the American League Championship Series gave the Tigers their first pennant since 2006 and completed a most thorough rout of the Yankees.

The Tigers never trailed in the series, outscoring the Yankees, 19-6. They were the fifth team in history to sweep a best-of-seven series without trailing in any game. The Red Sox were the last team to do it, crushing the Cardinals in the 2004 World Series.

“If someone told me we would sweep the Yankees in this series, I would have told them they were crazy,” Tigers manager Jim Leyland said.

Us too. But the Tigers did, much to the delight of the Boston Herald, which devotes its back page to the the Pinstrikes’ plunge.

 

 

To elaborate:

Yankees crash

NY faces many questions in offseason

DETROIT — In the span of one month, the 2011 Red Sox [team stats] mutated from World Series contenders into a team that choked on everything except its fried chicken.

The fall of the 2012 Yankees took only five days.

And what happens next figures to be fascinating.

The Red Sox learned the hard way that their rapid demise was rooted in more than merely one horrendous month. After taking over for Theo Epstein, general manager Ben Cherington only minimally tweaked the roster, and 93 losses later, the Sox suffered their worst season in 47 years.

So, although the Yankees won 95 games and the AL East title, the events of the past week have made it abundantly clear that GM Brian Cashman has nearly as much work to do this offseason as Cherington. The Yanks may have finished 26 games better than the Red Sox, but it somehow feels like they’re almost as far from winning another World Series.

And just for good measure, the Herald threw this into the mix:

Yankees lose their identity, lose their way

DETROIT — The growing chants of ‘sweep, sweep, sweep,’ cascaded from the rafters, an upper deck-to-dugout reminder of just how stunningly far and fast this Yankee season crashed to its end. This team didn’t just get swept out of the American League Championship Series by the 8-1 beating the Tigers put on them Thursday in Detroit; they were stripped bare of their pride, outclassed to the point that they couldn’t even take a lead for one of the 39 innings they played.

The home crowd bubbled with excitement as the Yankees took their final, feeble ninth-inning swings, and unleashed its full euphoria when Jayson Nix’s pop-up landed with the final out in Prince Fielder’s glove. But while Detroit’s door to delirium opened, a different one slammed shut on the Yankees. Devastated and disappointed, distracted and defeated, they walked off Comerica Park’s field as a hollowed out shell of the group that barely a week before, had willed its gritty, gutty self to a decisive Game 5 ALDS win over Baltimore.

Hard to argue with that. And hard to deny that the New York Post just might hate the Yankees even more than the Boston dailies do.

Page One (via the Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages):

 

 

As for the hardcringing staff, we believe the only clutch performance by a Yankee was Joe Girardi’s benching of Alex “No Connection” Rodriguez. If there’s one good thing that comes out of this dismal postseason, it might be that Mr. September comes off the Yankee roster.

See you around the Hot Stove.