Boston Dailies Wok & Roil Over Herald Front Page

August 2, 2019

From our Don’t Shoot the Messenger desk

It all started with the Boston Herald’s Thursday Page One.

 

 

The story inside:

 

 

Crosstown at the Boston Globe (which – full disclosure – is not really crosstown since the Globe moved to State Street and the Herald moved to Braintree), busibody columnist Shirley Leung quickly registered her objections.

Herald’s ‘Wok Tall’ front page is no laughing matter for Asian-Americans

I won’t use the “R-word” to describe the front page of Thursday’s Boston Herald, with its “Wok Tall” headline and a clumsy photo illustration depicting Governor Charlie Baker sitting in a giant Chinese takeout box of fried rice.

That’s because our country is so polarized we can’t even agree what is racist and what is not anymore. But for sure, the Herald front page is highly offensive to Chinese-Americans like me — and it should be to everyone else.

Wok jokes are straight out of the 1970s. They weren’t funny then, and they aren’t funny now. What does “Wok Tall” even mean, anyway?

 

Well, here’s what it meant to the Twitterverse’s umbrage-industrial complex.

 

 

(Editor’s Note: Paul Chartier is Former Producer of OMF on WEEI (and K&C for a wild 3 months). David Tanklefsky is an @7News special projects producer, play-by-play man, writer, musician.)

Further:

 

 

(Editor’s Note: Kirk Minihane and Shirley Leung have a history.)

Further:

This isn’t over – not by a long shot.


Hobby Lobby Runs Faith-of-July Ads in Boston Dailies

July 4, 2019

Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court’s favorite toy store, has placed full-page God and Country ads in today’s local dailies.

Here’s the Boston Herald’s page 9.

 

 

And here’s the Boston Globe’s A10.

 

 

The ads are a hodgepodge of quotes from U.S. presidents, Supreme Court justices, and – wait for it – Alexis de Tocqueville, all meant to bridge the church/state divide and claim the mantle of Psalm 33:12 – “Blessed is the nation whose God is the lord, the people he chose for his inheritance.”

Representative sample:

 

 

There are also websites listed where you can Chat About Jesus or download a Bible to your smartphone.

The hardreading staff supposes it should have some smart remark to insert here, but we’ll just let this one speak for itself.


Boston Herald’s New Home-Subscription Shenanigans

June 17, 2019

Now that the hardreading staff has gone all-digital and the Boston Herald is down to 16 home subscribers, the feisty local tabloid clearly needs to find new sources of revenue.

So buried on page 3 of today’s print edition is a To Our Readers box.

 

 

For those without magnifying glasses:

 

 

Really? An opt-out? That’s how you treat your faithful readers, Heraldniks?

And, all due respect, did it not occur to you to mention what the Special Section (Only $5.00!) is about?

Just wondering.


Juul’s Vape-and-Switch of Boston Herald in Ad Blitz

June 12, 2019

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, Juul Labs  – the company that owns 75% of the e-cigarette market – has locally run ads like these exclusively in the Boston Herald.

 

 

 

Now, though, faced with numerous lawsuits, Juul Labs is in Defcon 2 as our kissin’ cousins at Campaign Outsider have deftly noted, not to mention this piece by Lachlan Markay and Sam Stein in The Daily Beast.

Juul Spins Vaping as ‘Criminal Justice’ Issue for Black Lawmakers

The company has embarked on a massive lobbying campaign designed to reach the Congressional Black Caucus.

The vaping industry’s unrivaled leader, Juul, is making a huge push to ingratiate itself with America’s communities of color, hoping that doing so will win it critical allies within the Democratic Party who can help it navigate a high-stakes legislative and regulatory minefield.

The company has hired lobbyists and consultants with deep ties to prominent black and Latino lawmakers, steered money to congressional black and Hispanic caucuses, and made overtures to leading civil rights groups. It has enlisted the services of a former head of the NAACP, a board member of the Congressional Black Caucus’s political arm, and the Obama White House’s top civil rights liaison. And it’s sought the support of National Action Network chief Rev. Al Sharpton.

 

Two Daily Town rule of thumb (pat. pending): Whenever Al Sharpton is involved, kindly walk – do not run – to the nearest exit.

Given all that, Juul has now embarked on a full court press of full-page ads in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Boston Globe.

But not the Boston Herald.

Your condolences for the thirsty local tabloid go here.


Two-Daily Town Goes All Digital (And Slightly Mental)

May 23, 2019

For more than two decades the hardreading staff has proudly been one of the 17 home subscribers to the Boston Herald.

But the plopping of four daily newspapers on our doorstep every morning (Boston Herald, Boston Globe, New York Times, Wall Street Journal) has become too much to bear in this, our dotage. So we decided to pare down our print publications.

Ave atque vale, Globe and Herald print editions.

But, of course, it wasn’t that easy.

The Herald, feistily, told us that we’d have to wait for a month to convert our print subscription to a digital-only one – a sort of tabloid quarantine that seems totally self-defeating.

The Globe, on the other hand, welcomed our shift from print to digital, as it has with many others according to this piece from the estimable Don Seiffert in the Boston Business Journal,

The Boston Globe now has more online subscribers than print ones

The Boston Globe reached a milestone earlier this year when the number of its digital subscribers surpassed that of its weekday print subscribers for the first time — likely the only traditional, regional daily in the U.S. to have done so.

Filings the Globe submitted in the past week to the Alliance for Audited Media show that the inflection point occurred sometime in the first three months of the year. During that time, the number of weekday print subscribers fell from 108,719 to 98,978, an 11 percent decline year-over-year. That’s about on par with industry-wide rates of decline.

During the same time, the filing indicates that digital subscriptions — as measured by a category called “restricted digital access”— went from 107,902 to 112,241 as of March 31. While the Globe doesn’t specify exactly how it counts the number of online subscribers, restricted digital access seems to be a good approximation, and the paper’s director of consumer revenue, Tom Brown, confirmed this week that its number of online subscribers now stands at 112,700.

 

Handy circulation chart:

Except the BBJ piece kind of glossed over the economics of the Globe subscription shift.

Let’s take the hardreading staff, for example. Previously, we paid about $850 a year (!) for our Globe print subscription (digital access included). That’s roughly eight times what we pay for the Times or the Journal, and twice what we now pay for the Globe’s Sunday print edition and digital access.

Two-Daily Town Calculator (pat. pending):

For every lost print subscriber and gained digital subscriber, the Boston Globe loses roughly $400 per annum. Not to mention, according the the BBJ report, the Globe this past year lost 10,000 print subscribers and gained 5,000 digital ones.

Totally not sure how that makes the Boston Globe more financially viable.

But, as the big time reporters say, time will tell.


Stop & Shop to Boston Herald: Eat Your Heart Out

April 14, 2019

Now that the Teamsters have gone out in sympathy with the nearly 31,000 Stop & Shop workers who went on strike three days ago, management is apparently looking for some sympathy of its own. Thus, this full-page ad in today’s Boston Globe.

 

Here’s their website if you want more of management’s side. One thing they do not address is why they didn’t run the ad in the Boston Herald.

Afraid the readership is too union-friendly and an ad addressed to them would be a waste of money? Or just oblivious to the thirsty local tabloid, like so many others in this town.

Whatever, let’s hope those readers stop shopping at Stop & Shop. For good.


Boston Globe Redacts Redactions in Wynn Lawsuit

March 15, 2019

From our One Town, Two Different Worlds desk

The Boston Globe is shooting blanks on the Steve Wynn/Massachusetts Gaming Commission rumpus, which involves a lawsuit over documents that the disgraced casino mogul says are covered by attorney-client privilege.

Here’s how the stately local broadsheet handled the story in today’s edition.

It’s not until the 13th graf that the piece even mentions this fact: “The meeting minutes included substantial redactions, something [commission chairwoman Cathy] Judd-Stein said was necessary because the sessions included ‘a significant amount of attorney-client privileged communications.’”

No longer crosstown at the Boston Herald, Page One says it all.

 

 

Inside, the story gets the deluxe double-truck treatment.

 

 

Hey, Globeniks, you taking notes?

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the web version of the Globe piece does have a visual component.

(To be clear graf goes here)

To be clear, though, it’s a photo of the almost-finished Encore casino, not any of the redacted documents.

Score one for the snappy local tabloid.