Mike Bloomberg Even Has Ads in the Boston Herald

February 9, 2020

The chattering classes have no idea how far Mike Bloomberg’s staggering 300-million-going-on-one billion-dollar ad campaign extends.

Here’s conservative hall monitor Rich Lowry in yesterday’s Boston Herald op-ed page.

The level of his spending is truly astonishing — Croesus goes all-in on Super Tuesday. He’s spent more than $300 million on various forms of advertising. By the end, he’s going to make the profligate self-funder Tom Steyer — who managed to pointlessly buy himself onto the Democratic debate stage — look like a penny-pincher.

Bloomberg is running a presidential campaign that Curtis LeMay would love, carpet-bombing the airwaves every single day. He’s single-handedly changed the market for TV ads in many places. He spent $10 million on a Super Bowl spot, or about half of what Joe Biden raised in the entire fourth quarter.

 

And here’s what appears right below that on the Herald’s website.

 

 

Megabucks Mike is also running ads in the Herald’s E-Edition. This is what we got when we double-clicked for the text version of a Sinn Fein piece.

 

 

Most analysts – Lowry included – have focused on Bloomberg’s TV buys. But when a campaign is peppering the likes of the flimsy local tabloid with ads, it’s way beyond carpet-bombing.

Mike Bloomberg has gone nuclear.


Turn the Boston Herald Sideways, It Sorta Disappears

January 16, 2020

Since Digital Worst – sorry, First – Media bought it in 2018, the Boston Herald has been, to borrow a phrase from the great Raymond Chandler, thin as the gold on a weekend wedding ring, officially making the Herald the flimsy local tabloid.

And getting flimsier all the time.

Take yesterday’s edition: Of the paper’s 48 pages, four-and-a-half were given over to house ads such as this one.

 

 

Something under two pages were occupied by display – that is to say, paid – ads.

That’s non-business-as-usual for the fading local tabloid, which is suffering  knee-buckling decreases in both circulation and ad revenue.

As the redoubtable Don Seiffert noted in the Boston Business Journal last month, “[a]s of September 2014, the Herald had weekday print circulation of 60,960. As of this past September — six years later — that number was down to 33,337. Over the past year, the Herald’s weekday print circulation fell 16 percent.”

The paper’s Sunday circulation is even lower than its weekday readership, a distinction few metro dailies can claim.

Bottom line: The Boston Herald is disappearing in slow motion right before our eyes.

No wonder the hardreading staff has kissin’ cousins at It’s Sad to Live in a One-Daily Town.

And it will be, whatever you might think of the dodgy local tabloid.


Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest Waste Ever (VIII)

December 2, 2019

As one of the Boston Herald’s 17 home subscribers, the hardreading staff noted numerous times over the past few years how the print edition of the skimpy local tabloid was often missing late-breaking news and – especially – sports scores.

That deficiency became even more glaring when the Herald shifted its printing a year and a half ago from the Boston Globe’s Taunton facility to the Providence Journal’s Rhode Island press, moving deadlines up to, oh, tea time.

(That contributed in no small part to our dropping the print subscription after several decades and going all-digital.)

But at least the Herald E-Edition would deliver the the later stuff.

Not any more.

Here’s the E-Edition reporting on the New England Patriots’ unthinkable (lookin’ at you, Dan Shaughnessy) loss to the Houston Texans last night.

 

 

As it says at the bottom of the left-hand page, you can get full coverage of last night’s game here.

But at that point, why would you bother?


Boston Globe Packages Self-Promotion As News

September 28, 2019

The hardreading staff has diligently chronicled the Boston Herald’s tendency to turn publicity material into editorial content (see our ongoing series Hark! The Herald! for details of the selfie local tabloid’s puffery).

But, truth be told, the Boston Globe is not immune to that same temptation. As we noted not long ago, “the Boston Globe has lately done its share of self-promotion as well. There was all the hubbub in the newshole last month over the paper’s HUBweek festival, and this wet kiss for ‘Globe Live’ in the Names column last week.”

Now comes this front-page piece in yesterday’s $tately local broadsheet.

 

 

C’mon, Globeniks – that’s not news; it’s PR.

Rather than make poor Andy Rosen “report” your press releases, why not promote HubWeek the same way you do the GlobeDocs Film Festival?

 

 

Perhaps because . . . Linda Pizzuti Henry, the Globe’s managing director and wife of Globe owner John Henry, is also cofounder of HubWeek.

Perhaps.


104 Bay State Groups Call Out Boston Calling Verdict

September 16, 2019

Last month Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan – former aides to Boston Mayor Marty Walsh – were convicted in federal court on charges of extortion and conspiracy to commit extortion (both for Brissette, the latter for Sullivan) for their 2014 arm-twisting of the Boston Calling music festival to hire union workers.

Those verdicts led to a flurry of hand-wringing, as a quick search of the Googletron reveals.

 

 

Now comes this two-page ad that a gaggle of advocacy groups ranging from the A. Philip Randolph Institute to the Worcester Interfaith Coalition ran in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

 

 

(The same spread ran in yesterday’s Boston Herald just harder to read.)

Anyway, here’s the nut graf.

 

 

The hardreading staff is the first to admit that our legal knowledge comes entirely from the Jerry Orbach School of Law, but aren’t gender, race, and religion sort of protected classes in Massachusetts? And aren’t unions, well, not?

Regardless, back to that Google search above. Look closely and you’ll see one dissenting voice among the pearl-clutchers: Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi, who filed this piece in the wake of the Boston Calling verdicts.

Democracy chilled by campaign against Boston Calling verdict

You know what has a chilling effect on democracy?

Telling concert organizers if they don’t hire union workers they don’t need or want, the City of Boston won’t give them a permit for their event.

That’s what a federal jury found Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan, two city hall officials, guilty of doing. But in a bizarre twist of logic, some 70 nonprofit organizations, representing environmental, LGBTQ, housing, senior, education, and civil rights advocates, are calling out the verdict as a democracy slayer. Ten Boston city councilors also signed a statement, decrying the case as a “grievous misuse of limited prosecutorial resources in service of a misguided political agenda” and “a terrible precedent.”

Really?

 

Read the whole piece. It’s an effective chaser to the shot taken in yesterday’s double-trucks.


Boston Dailies Wok & Roil Over Herald Front Page

August 2, 2019

From our Don’t Shoot the Messenger desk

It all started with the Boston Herald’s Thursday Page One.

 

 

The story inside:

 

 

Crosstown at the Boston Globe (which – full disclosure – is not really crosstown since the Globe moved to State Street and the Herald moved to Braintree), busibody columnist Shirley Leung quickly registered her objections.

Herald’s ‘Wok Tall’ front page is no laughing matter for Asian-Americans

I won’t use the “R-word” to describe the front page of Thursday’s Boston Herald, with its “Wok Tall” headline and a clumsy photo illustration depicting Governor Charlie Baker sitting in a giant Chinese takeout box of fried rice.

That’s because our country is so polarized we can’t even agree what is racist and what is not anymore. But for sure, the Herald front page is highly offensive to Chinese-Americans like me — and it should be to everyone else.

Wok jokes are straight out of the 1970s. They weren’t funny then, and they aren’t funny now. What does “Wok Tall” even mean, anyway?

 

Well, here’s what it meant to the Twitterverse’s umbrage-industrial complex.

 

 

(Editor’s Note: Paul Chartier is Former Producer of OMF on WEEI (and K&C for a wild 3 months). David Tanklefsky is an @7News special projects producer, play-by-play man, writer, musician.)

Further:

 

 

(Editor’s Note: Kirk Minihane and Shirley Leung have a history.)

Further:

This isn’t over – not by a long shot.


Hobby Lobby Runs Faith-of-July Ads in Boston Dailies

July 4, 2019

Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court’s favorite toy store, has placed full-page God and Country ads in today’s local dailies.

Here’s the Boston Herald’s page 9.

 

 

And here’s the Boston Globe’s A10.

 

 

The ads are a hodgepodge of quotes from U.S. presidents, Supreme Court justices, and – wait for it – Alexis de Tocqueville, all meant to bridge the church/state divide and claim the mantle of Psalm 33:12 – “Blessed is the nation whose God is the lord, the people he chose for his inheritance.”

Representative sample:

 

 

There are also websites listed where you can Chat About Jesus or download a Bible to your smartphone.

The hardreading staff supposes it should have some smart remark to insert here, but we’ll just let this one speak for itself.