Hark! The Herald! (Both Sides No Edition)

November 6, 2017

As the hardreading staff has noted on numerous occasions, the Boston Herald has consistently failed to grasp the distinction between news and promotion.

Exhibit Umpteen: Today’s edition of the selfie local tabloid, which devotes half a page of its ever dwindling newshole to a talk Herald columnist Adriana Cohen gave yesterday at a Harvard student conference.

 

 

Just nuts graf:

“No one has a monopoly on smart,” Cohen said [at the event]. “There are good and smart people on both sides of the aisle and across demographics. When some people only want to hear one side of an argument, or one narrow set of ideas, they’re doing themselves a great disservice. We can all learn from one another.”

 

That’s rich, given that Cohen – a charter member of the Trumpettes – has demonstrably never met a knee she wouldn’t jerk.

Just as the Herald has never met a PR event it wouldn’t dress up as news.

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the Boston Globe has lately done its share of self-promotion as well. There was all the hubbub in the newshole last month over the paper’s HUBweek festival, and this wet kiss for “Globe Live” in the Names column last week.

 

 

Never say we don’t give you both sides.

Two-Daily Tune bonus track:

 

 

Advertisements

Boston Globe Stiffs Herald – After Herald Stiffs Worcester Telegram – on Boy-Beating Girl Golfer

October 28, 2017

The hardreading staff has on more than one occasion referred to the Boston Herald as a “lively index to the Boston Globe.”

But every now and again it’s the Globe that becomes a lowly caboose to the Herald.

Like yesterday.

Let’s begin with this piece in Thursday’s Herald.

TEEING OFF ON BOYS’ CLUB

Girl golfer wins tourney, MIAA withholds her trophy

The record books won’t note Emily Nash’s amazing three-over-par high school tournament victory — because she’s a girl.

That has golfers from all over the country calling to praise the 16-year-old Lunenburg High junior who beat all the boys.

“It still kind of stinks,” Nash told the Herald last night. She had to give up the trophy to the second-place finisher.

“I’m disappointed I didn’t get the trophy. But that’s OK. Even if I didn’t get the trophy, everyone knew my score,” she said. “In golf, it’s all about the rules.”

 

In the news business, though, the rules are slightly looser. So on Friday, the Globe unblushingly ran this piece.

Girl golfer beats boys, denied trophy

MIAA rule book allows her to play, but not to win

She was allowed to golf with the boys, but the rules didn’t allow her to beat them.

So when Emily Nash, a Lunenburg High School junior, shot the best score at the Central region Division 3 high school golf tournament at Blissful Meadows in Uxbridge on Tuesday, officials had to hand the trophy to the best-scoring boy, who had finished four strokes back.

 

Drive the Herald nuts graf:

“The statewide rule that denied her a victory will be reviewed and possibly changed, high school sports officials said. On its face, it certainly seems like an injustice to deny a trophy to the golfer with the best score, and Nash’s story has quickly gained national attention, amplified by social media and highlighted on the Web page of the PGA.”

Not to mention local attention, which the Globe conveniently did not mention.

Low class, Globeniks. Very low class.

UPDATE:

(Tip o’ the pixel to @lordpaluzzi via @dankennedy_nu)


EF Education First Puts PR First in Boston Globe Ad

October 2, 2017

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

Some of you splendid readers might be scratching your heads over this full-page ad in today’s Boston Globe.

 

 

EF is Education First North America, which loves the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation for millions of very good reasons.

To wit:

EF Education First Breaks Ground on Third Building in Cambridge, Creating International Education Campus Along Charles River

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker and many Commonwealth and City of Cambridge leaders today joined EF Education First North America CEO Dr. Edward Hult to break ground on the company’s third new building in Cambridge’s North Point neighborhood, which will result in the creation of 300 new jobs, acres of new public parkland and recreational amenities, and a new permanent operations and maintenance facility for the MA Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR).

 

The press release also notes this: “In 2014, the Massachusetts State Legislature unanimously passed special legislation allowing EF to acquire a 125,000-square-foot parcel of land owned by DCR and MassDOT for $20.4 million USD, which previously housed a temporary maintenance facility for DCR. The proceeds from the land sale will fund the construction of a permanent maintenance facility for DCR on one portion of the parcel, which represents an important unmet Big Dig mitigation obligation.”

Swell.

But wait, there’s more – this item ran in the Business section of today’s Globe, a sort of gift-with-purchase.

 

 

Interesting that the press release didn’t mention the $31 million state handout, but, hey, you can’t have everything.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, however, they pretty much can’t have anything. Education First might love the DCR, but it doesn’t care a fig for the thirsty local tabloid, presumably on the assumption that Herald readers aren’t interested in language classes and overseas education trips.

Huh.


Equifax to Boston Herald Readers: Fax You!

September 25, 2017

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As you splendid readers no doubt know, the credit-monitoring firm Equifax has faxed up in a major way, both in letting sensitive information about 143 million users get hacked, then in its response to the breach, as Wired’s Lily Hay Newman has reported.

ALL THE WAYS EQUIFAX EPICALLY BUNGLED ITS BREACH RESPONSE

THE BREACH OF the credit monitoring firm Equifax, which exposed extensive personal data for 143 million people, is the worst corporate data breach to date. But, incredibly, the mistakes and the superlatives don’t end there. Three weeks since the company first publicly disclosed the situation, a steady stream of gaffes and revelations paint a picture of Equifax’s deeply lacking response to catastrophe.

 

Part of that “deeply lacking response” is this full-page ad that ran in yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe.

 

 

There’s all kinds of lawyered-up corporate speak in the ad which we won’t bore you with because, well, it’s lawyered-up corporate speak.

But what we will say is this: Hey, Equifax – where’s your “Notice of Breach” to Boston Herald readers?

You think they don’t care about their credit scores? You think they don’t worry about identity theft?

That’s faxed up, yo.


Boston Herald Printing Woes Come Closer to Home

September 15, 2017

For much of the past week, the Boston Herald has been running this Notice to our readers that whacks the Boston Globe – which prints the feisty local tabloid – for, well, not printing the feisty local tabloid.

 

 

As of Wednesday, the S.S. Globe was still listing to port, a fact Globe editor Brian McGrory conceded to WGBH’s Boston Public Radio in a rather roundabout manner (round about 1:41;00).

We’ve been on a difficult run over over here. We’ve had many many good nights putting out the newspaper; we’ve had some bad nights too. This all stems from we opened up a new production plant in the city of Taunton back in the spring; we had to leave Morrissey Boulevard because we’re in the process of selling that property, and it’s proven more difficult than we anticipated to get quality newspapers out in a timely way, and it’s gone on for quite a while.

Decisions were made over here this week to try to get new leadership in place in production and the result is some very very good high quality people are no longer here at the Globe. And that doesn’t mean they didn’t have a major contribution to this place over many many years – they should be proud of what they’ve done. But the decision was made by people at a higher pay grade than me that we needed new leadership. I expect that’s gonna work out well.

 

Uh-huh. Asked whether the Globe is making progress toward fixing the snafus, McGrory said this:

“We think we’re making progress, yeah. We’ve had some very very good stretches – a week, two weeks at a time with some improving quality but then we’ll have significant setbacks. We did this past weekend on Saturday night. A lot of papers didn’t get to our subscribers on Sunday, which is obviously a really important day for us, and, you know, amid the progress there are setbacks and it’s really really frustrating.

“But the overall trendiness are showing improvement, but we need it to come faster and we need to be more consistent. We owe it to our most loyal readers, who are the most sophisticated newspaper readers in this country.”

That’s it – not a word, or a question, about the damage inflicted on the Herald. Just 10 pounds of baloney in a five-pound bag.

Meanwhile, how’s the Good Ship Lollygag doing at the end of the week?

Well, the hardreading staff didn’t get its copy of the Herald this morning. So you tell us.


Lobsters on a Roll in Boston Dailies

September 5, 2017

It was a virtual crustacean collision in the local papers yesterday, as stories about oddly colored lobsters appeared in both.

Start with this piece in the Boston Globe’s Metro section.

Rare-colored lobsters keep turning up

On Wednesday, the New England Aquarium in Boston announced it had received a donation of a rare yellow lobster, a “one in 30 million” catch from the coast of Marblehead.

That same day, the Bangor Daily News reported a Maine man had caught a “one in 100 million” white lobster last week.

Those were just the latest examples of what seem to be increasing reports of good-fortuned lobstermen hauling in crustaceans with exceedingly rare hues.

 

Globe reporter Matt Rocheleau even played oddsmaker, listing a color wheel of rare lobsters.

Other uncommon colors include:

■ Blue: which is said to be a one in 2 million find;

■ Orange: one in 10 million;

■ Red: one in 10 million;

■ Calico: one in 30 million;

■ Split-colored: one in 50 million.

 

But . . .

What are the odds that a lobster of a different color would turn up in the Boston Herald (via the Associated Press) the same day?

 

 

Here’s the ghostly guy himself.

 

 

So, happy ending: One went to the Marian Manor of crustaceans, while the other returned to the briny deep.

Obviously – and mercifully – hold the drawn butter.


Boston Globe Finally Runs Wayne Woodlief Obituary

August 28, 2017

For the past two weeks the hardtsking staff has been on the Boston Globe like Brown on Williamson over the paper’s failure to publish an obituary for Boston Herald stalwart Wayne Woodlief, who died on August 12.

Yesterday the wait ended with this piece in the Boston Sunday Globe.

Wayne Woodlief, 82; longtime Boston Herald political reporter, columnist

With the future of the Boston Herald at stake in 1988, political reporter Wayne Woodlief spent days stalking Senator Edward M. Kennedy, posing the same question wherever he went: “Senator, why are you trying to kill the Herald?” . . . 

“Kennedy’s Vendetta,” the paper’s headlines declared amid revelations that the senator had quietly maneuvered legislation into a catch-all spending bill that would prevent regulators from reconsidering rules preventing [Herald owner Rupert] Murdoch from owning a newspaper and a TV station in the same market.

Mr. Woodlief’s dogged, yet gentlemanly, pursuit of the senator epitomized his devotion to freedom of the press and his character, friends said.

 

Nice lede, nice tribute overall by Globe correspondent J.M. Lawrence.

Last word to Herald editorial page editor Rachelle Cohen: “Wayne Woodlief had a kind word for everyone he met . . . He brought civility and even grace to a highly competitive profession and to the often uncivil world of politics that he covered.”

Amen.