Boston Herald Printing Woes Come Closer to Home

September 15, 2017

For much of the past week, the Boston Herald has been running this Notice to our readers that whacks the Boston Globe – which prints the feisty local tabloid – for, well, not printing the feisty local tabloid.

 

 

As of Wednesday, the S.S. Globe was still listing to port, a fact Globe editor Brian McGrory conceded to WGBH’s Boston Public Radio in a rather roundabout manner (round about 1:41;00).

We’ve been on a difficult run over over here. We’ve had many many good nights putting out the newspaper; we’ve had some bad nights too. This all stems from we opened up a new production plant in the city of Taunton back in the spring; we had to leave Morrissey Boulevard because we’re in the process of selling that property, and it’s proven more difficult than we anticipated to get quality newspapers out in a timely way, and it’s gone on for quite a while.

Decisions were made over here this week to try to get new leadership in place in production and the result is some very very good high quality people are no longer here at the Globe. And that doesn’t mean they didn’t have a major contribution to this place over many many years – they should be proud of what they’ve done. But the decision was made by people at a higher pay grade than me that we needed new leadership. I expect that’s gonna work out well.

 

Uh-huh. Asked whether the Globe is making progress toward fixing the snafus, McGrory said this:

“We think we’re making progress, yeah. We’ve had some very very good stretches – a week, two weeks at a time with some improving quality but then we’ll have significant setbacks. We did this past weekend on Saturday night. A lot of papers didn’t get to our subscribers on Sunday, which is obviously a really important day for us, and, you know, amid the progress there are setbacks and it’s really really frustrating.

“But the overall trendiness are showing improvement, but we need it to come faster and we need to be more consistent. We owe it to our most loyal readers, who are the most sophisticated newspaper readers in this country.”

That’s it – not a word, or a question, about the damage inflicted on the Herald. Just 10 pounds of baloney in a five-pound bag.

Meanwhile, how’s the Good Ship Lollygag doing at the end of the week?

Well, the hardreading staff didn’t get its copy of the Herald this morning. So you tell us.

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Lobsters on a Roll in Boston Dailies

September 5, 2017

It was a virtual crustacean collision in the local papers yesterday, as stories about oddly colored lobsters appeared in both.

Start with this piece in the Boston Globe’s Metro section.

Rare-colored lobsters keep turning up

On Wednesday, the New England Aquarium in Boston announced it had received a donation of a rare yellow lobster, a “one in 30 million” catch from the coast of Marblehead.

That same day, the Bangor Daily News reported a Maine man had caught a “one in 100 million” white lobster last week.

Those were just the latest examples of what seem to be increasing reports of good-fortuned lobstermen hauling in crustaceans with exceedingly rare hues.

 

Globe reporter Matt Rocheleau even played oddsmaker, listing a color wheel of rare lobsters.

Other uncommon colors include:

■ Blue: which is said to be a one in 2 million find;

■ Orange: one in 10 million;

■ Red: one in 10 million;

■ Calico: one in 30 million;

■ Split-colored: one in 50 million.

 

But . . .

What are the odds that a lobster of a different color would turn up in the Boston Herald (via the Associated Press) the same day?

 

 

Here’s the ghostly guy himself.

 

 

So, happy ending: One went to the Marian Manor of crustaceans, while the other returned to the briny deep.

Obviously – and mercifully – hold the drawn butter.


Boston Globe Finally Runs Wayne Woodlief Obituary

August 28, 2017

For the past two weeks the hardtsking staff has been on the Boston Globe like Brown on Williamson over the paper’s failure to publish an obituary for Boston Herald stalwart Wayne Woodlief, who died on August 12.

Yesterday the wait ended with this piece in the Boston Sunday Globe.

Wayne Woodlief, 82; longtime Boston Herald political reporter, columnist

With the future of the Boston Herald at stake in 1988, political reporter Wayne Woodlief spent days stalking Senator Edward M. Kennedy, posing the same question wherever he went: “Senator, why are you trying to kill the Herald?” . . . 

“Kennedy’s Vendetta,” the paper’s headlines declared amid revelations that the senator had quietly maneuvered legislation into a catch-all spending bill that would prevent regulators from reconsidering rules preventing [Herald owner Rupert] Murdoch from owning a newspaper and a TV station in the same market.

Mr. Woodlief’s dogged, yet gentlemanly, pursuit of the senator epitomized his devotion to freedom of the press and his character, friends said.

 

Nice lede, nice tribute overall by Globe correspondent J.M. Lawrence.

Last word to Herald editorial page editor Rachelle Cohen: “Wayne Woodlief had a kind word for everyone he met . . . He brought civility and even grace to a highly competitive profession and to the often uncivil world of politics that he covered.”

Amen.


3rd Time: Where’s the Globe’s Wayne Woodlief Obit?

August 23, 2017

From our Are You Kidding? desk

As the headscratching staff has been asking for two weeks now, why has the Boston Globe failed to run an obituary for Boston Herald reporter/columnist Wayne Woodlief, who died at the age of 82 on August 12?

The Herald, of course, memorialized Wayne right away. As did the Nieman Foundation.

Wayne Woodlief, NF ’66 and former political columnist, dies at 82

Longtime Boston Herald political columnist and 1966 Nieman Fellow Wayne Woodlief died on Aug. 12 at the age of 82.

A graduate of Duke University, he began his journalism career as a sportswriter and later a city politics reporter for the Ledger-Star in Norfolk, Va. He then moved on to join The Virginian-Pilot/Ledger-Star’s Washington, D.C., bureau.

In 1974, Woodlief became the Boston Herald-American’s Washington correspondent. He was promoted as the newspaper’s political editor in 1977 but missed the beat and returned to reporting.

 

But still nothing from the Globe.

Bad form, Globeniks. Bad form.


Seriously, Where’s the Globe’s Wayne Woodlief Obit?

August 21, 2017

As the hardtsking staff has previously noted, the Boston Globe, for reasons known only to itself, has failed to run an obituary for the Boston Herald’s redoubtable Wayne Woodlief, who died on August 12.

Plug his name into the Globe search engine and you get this.

 

 

That one link leads to a 2011 Globe obit for Wayne’s late wife, Norine G. Johnson. But nothing for him.

Coincidentally, today’s Herald features this item.

Wayne Woodlief memorial service set for September

A memorial service to celebrate the life and memory of former Boston Herald columnist and political reporter Wayne Woodlief will be held Sept. 23 at 11 a.m. at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.

A reception will follow at a location to be announced.

Mr. Woodlief died Aug. 12 at the age of 82.

 

Maybe by then the Globe will have done the right thing and run a proper remembrance of a fellow journalist.


Where’s the Boston Globe’s Wayne Woodlief Obit?

August 16, 2017

The redoubtable Wayne Woodlief – a gentleman journalist if there ever was one – died last week at the age of 82.

His Boston Herald colleague Rachelle Cohen wrote a lovely tribute to Wayne this past weekend.

This gentle man, still with a trace of a southern drawl — a legacy of his Virginia roots — always had time to answer a question, to share a bit of political history, to put a harried day into perspective for those who thought they would never make it through to deadline.

There was no “crisis” that the man couldn’t talk you through.

Alzheimer’s robbed us first of the man we all knew — the man who could list all the possible Democratic candidates in the 8th Congressional District race of 1986. Then early yesterday morning, it claimed the rest of him, when he died peacefully in his sleep.

 

Joe Fitzgerald, a Herald columnist who rarely agreed with Wayne politically, also had kind words for him.

We ribbed and teased each other so mercilessly that our friendship began to resemble a comedy routine, especially after this column left its longtime home in sports and moved onto Wayne’s turf, which was politics.

That offered a mother lode of conversational ammunition, since he regarded this writer as something to the right of Attila the Hun while he was seen here as slightly to the left of whatever passes for normal these days.

But you don’t poke fun at someone you don’t like, and Wayne was more than liked here. Indeed, he was admired, so much so that there was no better feeling than knowing you had earned his approval.

 

But . . .

Not a word yet from the Boston Globe.

C’mon, Globeniks – you were quick enough to eulogize WBZ legal eagle Neil Chayet, another local media stalwart who passed away last week.

Do the write thing and give Wayne Woodlief his due.


Boston Globe Printing Press Just Crushing Things

July 18, 2017

With the departure of Doug Franklin as Boston Globe CEO after only six months on the job, we now have our second casualty of the paper’s new Taunton printing facility. (Tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation.)

The first casualty? The daily baseball scores.

Earlier this month, the Globe ran this note on Page One of the Sports section for over a week.

 

 

Fair enough. But here’s the baseball scoreboard from one of the print editions right before the All Star break..

 

 

Seriously? A ballgame in Philadelphia or New York is a “late game score”?

As for being resolved by mid-July, here’s the scoreboard from today’s print edition:

 

 

Meanwhile, the Boston Herald, which the Globe also prints at its Taunton facility, is suffering the same fate, but has a different solution. The tardy local tabloid just doesn’t list the games whose scores are missing.

 

 

That is so Boston Herald, no?

UPDATE: Sharp-eyed (and -tongued) reader Paul sent this:

Um, the Herald splits the AL and NL scores in print. All the games they “didn’t list” are on the other side of the page.

But I suppose that doesn’t fit your pithy little quip, does it?

 

The hardlyreading staff apologizes for the brain freeze.