Equifax to Boston Herald Readers: Fax You!

September 25, 2017

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As you splendid readers no doubt know, the credit-monitoring firm Equifax has faxed up in a major way, both in letting sensitive information about 143 million users get hacked, then in its response to the breach, as Wired’s Lily Hay Newman has reported.

ALL THE WAYS EQUIFAX EPICALLY BUNGLED ITS BREACH RESPONSE

THE BREACH OF the credit monitoring firm Equifax, which exposed extensive personal data for 143 million people, is the worst corporate data breach to date. But, incredibly, the mistakes and the superlatives don’t end there. Three weeks since the company first publicly disclosed the situation, a steady stream of gaffes and revelations paint a picture of Equifax’s deeply lacking response to catastrophe.

 

Part of that “deeply lacking response” is this full-page ad that ran in yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe.

 

 

There’s all kinds of lawyered-up corporate speak in the ad which we won’t bore you with because, well, it’s lawyered-up corporate speak.

But what we will say is this: Hey, Equifax – where’s your “Notice of Breach” to Boston Herald readers?

You think they don’t care about their credit scores? You think they don’t worry about identity theft?

That’s faxed up, yo.

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Boston Herald Printing Woes Come Closer to Home

September 15, 2017

For much of the past week, the Boston Herald has been running this Notice to our readers that whacks the Boston Globe – which prints the feisty local tabloid – for, well, not printing the feisty local tabloid.

 

 

As of Wednesday, the S.S. Globe was still listing to port, a fact Globe editor Brian McGrory conceded to WGBH’s Boston Public Radio in a rather roundabout manner (round about 1:41;00).

We’ve been on a difficult run over over here. We’ve had many many good nights putting out the newspaper; we’ve had some bad nights too. This all stems from we opened up a new production plant in the city of Taunton back in the spring; we had to leave Morrissey Boulevard because we’re in the process of selling that property, and it’s proven more difficult than we anticipated to get quality newspapers out in a timely way, and it’s gone on for quite a while.

Decisions were made over here this week to try to get new leadership in place in production and the result is some very very good high quality people are no longer here at the Globe. And that doesn’t mean they didn’t have a major contribution to this place over many many years – they should be proud of what they’ve done. But the decision was made by people at a higher pay grade than me that we needed new leadership. I expect that’s gonna work out well.

 

Uh-huh. Asked whether the Globe is making progress toward fixing the snafus, McGrory said this:

“We think we’re making progress, yeah. We’ve had some very very good stretches – a week, two weeks at a time with some improving quality but then we’ll have significant setbacks. We did this past weekend on Saturday night. A lot of papers didn’t get to our subscribers on Sunday, which is obviously a really important day for us, and, you know, amid the progress there are setbacks and it’s really really frustrating.

“But the overall trendiness are showing improvement, but we need it to come faster and we need to be more consistent. We owe it to our most loyal readers, who are the most sophisticated newspaper readers in this country.”

That’s it – not a word, or a question, about the damage inflicted on the Herald. Just 10 pounds of baloney in a five-pound bag.

Meanwhile, how’s the Good Ship Lollygag doing at the end of the week?

Well, the hardreading staff didn’t get its copy of the Herald this morning. So you tell us.


Lobsters on a Roll in Boston Dailies

September 5, 2017

It was a virtual crustacean collision in the local papers yesterday, as stories about oddly colored lobsters appeared in both.

Start with this piece in the Boston Globe’s Metro section.

Rare-colored lobsters keep turning up

On Wednesday, the New England Aquarium in Boston announced it had received a donation of a rare yellow lobster, a “one in 30 million” catch from the coast of Marblehead.

That same day, the Bangor Daily News reported a Maine man had caught a “one in 100 million” white lobster last week.

Those were just the latest examples of what seem to be increasing reports of good-fortuned lobstermen hauling in crustaceans with exceedingly rare hues.

 

Globe reporter Matt Rocheleau even played oddsmaker, listing a color wheel of rare lobsters.

Other uncommon colors include:

■ Blue: which is said to be a one in 2 million find;

■ Orange: one in 10 million;

■ Red: one in 10 million;

■ Calico: one in 30 million;

■ Split-colored: one in 50 million.

 

But . . .

What are the odds that a lobster of a different color would turn up in the Boston Herald (via the Associated Press) the same day?

 

 

Here’s the ghostly guy himself.

 

 

So, happy ending: One went to the Marian Manor of crustaceans, while the other returned to the briny deep.

Obviously – and mercifully – hold the drawn butter.