Boston Globe Ad: German Reunification Is Wunderbar Boston Globe News: Not So Fast

October 5, 2020

Interesting juxtaposition in yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe.

Item One: This half-page Wunderbar Together ad on A12.

 

 

Body copy:

 

Wunderbar!

Item Two: This pickup on A15 from the New York Times piece by Katrin Bennhold.

 

 

Neo-Nazis go nuts graf:

“Reunification was a huge boost for the far right,” said [Ingo] Hasselbach, who left the neo-Nazi scene years ago and now helps others to do the same. “The neo-Nazis were the first ones to be reunified. We laid the foundation for a party like [Alternative for Germany]. There are things we used to say that have become mainstream today.”

 

Your headscratch goes here.


Boston Globe Whiffs Again on Alex Verdugo’s Past

September 7, 2020

In his Sunday Baseball Notes column, Boston Globe reporter Peter Abraham had this to say in one of his bulleted Red Sox observations.

▪ You can, and should, hate the Betts trade. But Sox fans are clearly warming up to Alex Verdugo.

Verdugo had an .875 OPS through his first 38 games, but it’s much more than that. He plays with passion, and after a few fundamental flubs early in the season has become an excellent outfielder. His seven outfield assists lead the majors. There are 23 teams who don’t have as many.

Verdugo also runs out every ground ball regardless of the score and seems genuinely happy to be playing for the Red Sox. There’s a lot to like.

 

Except, of course, that 2015 business about Verdugo witnessing the assault of a teenage girl by two of his minor league teammates and doing nothing about it. [CORRECTION: It was two women who committed the assault.]

Yesterday’s column was at least the second time that Abraham has put on the pom poms for Verdugo. Here’s what the hardreading staff wrote back in February.

The story has also been all over Twitter this past week. But there was nothing in the stately local broadsheet until this story by Peter Abraham and Alex Speier ran in the Boston Sunday Globe (and was buried on the website).

To call that eyewash is an insult to saline solution everywhere.

 

Especially since it omitted some significant facts, as Jessica Quiroli – who has chronicled the incident in chilling detail on her blog All Heels on Deck – noted on Twitter at the time.

It’s curious that neither one of those pieces by Abraham disclosed John Henry’s dual ownership of the Boston GlobeSox. In fact, very few Globe pieces on the Red Sox include disclosure these days. Even the normally fastidious Dan Shaughnessy, while trashing Red Sox ownership in this piece just up on the web, has dropped disclosure.

And as we’ve previously stated, before you bother pelting us with tweets, a) No, everyone does not know that Henry owns them both, and b) Even if everyone did know, the disclosure should still be in there.

Yes – every single time.


Mass. Senate Wannabe Joe K 3.0 Is a Total Weenie

August 10, 2020

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Joseph P. Kennedy III’s primary challenge to Sen. Ed Markey (D-Dad Sneakers) is grounded in nothing but naked ambition.

That, however, has not kept the Kennedy campaign from whining about non-existent attacks from the Markey campaign.

From Danny McDonald’s piece in the Boston Sunday Globe about a pro-Kennedy super PAC ad attacking Markey and the back-and-forth between the campaigns.

[Emily] Kaufman, the Kennedy campaign spokeswoman, said, “None of us have experienced anything like the vitriol, misinformation, and personal attacks launched at Joe and his supporters by Senator Markey’s network over the past several months. It has been horrific. And we think the Senator needs to take responsibility for the tone and tenor of the people supporting him in this race.”

 

Seriously? As the estimable Dan Kennedy (no relation to Joe) tweeted:

 

 

Our conclusion: Joe K 3.0 is a Chapstick snowflake who has run a thoroughly unpersuasive challenge to a sitting senator when there’s not a dime’s worth of difference between the two on policy issues.

Your conclusion goes here.


Boston Herald: Local News in Danger, Please Send $

August 7, 2020

Well the hardreading staff opened up the old mailbag yesterday and what should pour out but this email from the Boston Herald.

 

How you can help the local business of delivering local news

Local news is in danger.

Coronavirus and stay-at-home orders have forced many local businesses to close. If a business closes, it’s not likely to advertise. The result has been a dramatic decline in the advertising revenue that supports local news organizations like ours.

To offset the losses, we have furloughed staff, cut back on the size of the newspaper to save newsprint costs and reduced other expenses. We don’t want to do any more of that. Deeper cuts jeopardize our ability to deliver a comprehensive daily report that keeps you up to date on the latest developments in your community . . .

The only way local news like ours will survive is through the support of readers like you.

 

That’s rich coming from a newspaper whose hedge fund owners at Alden Global Capital have stripped it like a car left overnight on the Cross Bronx Expressway.

(See our kissin’ cousins at One-Daily Town for further details.)

To recap: The vampire capitalists get to suck the lifeblood out of the scrawny local tabloid and we’re expected to provide a transfusion?

Pass the garlic, please.


Lord + Taylor Retail Chain Takes Bostonians for Idiots

August 4, 2020

Venerable department store chain Lord + Taylor, which recently had the bright idea to sell itself to online clothing rental outfit Le Tote, has now filed for bankruptcy protection.

It also ran this full-page ad in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

 

 

Drive-us-nuts graf.

Nowhere in all that advertising eyewash (which is actually an insult to saline solution everywhere) does L+T reveal that it has closed every one of its stores in the Greater Boston area.

Call the roll.

  • Burlington Mall, 1320 Burlington Mall Road, Burlington, Massachusetts
  • Natick Mall, 1245 Worcester Road Natick, Massachusetts
  • Prudential Center, 760 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts
  • South Shore Plaza, 250 Granite St., Braintree, Massachusetts

 

As the local pearl clutchers might say, O My Lord + Taylor!


Google: ‘Support Local News’ Except Boston Herald

June 14, 2020

Google’s $15 million Support Local News campaign made its Boston debut today with this full-page ad on A5 of the Boston Sunday Globe.

 

 

Here’s the body copy.

 

 

Poynter’s Kristen Hare noted the other day that the campaign’s heart is in the right place, even though its wallet might be a bit slim.

“Support Local News,” from the Google News Initiative, Local Media Consortium and Local Media Association will spend $15 million in ads in local newspapers, their sites, radio, TV and online-only newsrooms in North America for the next six weeks . . .

Google did not say how much each newsroom was getting. But let’s say there are 3,000 of them and they’re each getting an equal amount, that’s about $5,000 each.

That’s likely not enough to prevent layoffs, furloughs, pay cuts or to save a newsroom on the brink of closing. But it does set an example for brands and advertisers to invest directly into local news, Fran Wills, CEO of LMC, told Poynter.

 

So far at least, the Boston Herald is not one of the lucky newsrooms. So the headscratching staff sent this message to the Googleniks:

“[We’re] curious why you ran a full-page ad in the Boston Globe today but nothing in the Boston Herald. Given that this is one of the few two-daily towns left, one would think you’d look to support both local papers. Any particular reason you’re not?”

We will, as always, keep you posted.


Boston Herald Jacks Up Newsstand Price by 40%

June 8, 2020

Sharp-eyed commenter Mark sent this heads-up to the hardreading staff today.

Maybe it’s the lack of ads, but did you notice that the newsstand price of The Herald went up to $3.50 last week? $3.50! More than The NY Times, the Globe, and almost as much as the New York Daily News and the New York Post together! Who is going to be so devoted to Howie Carr, yet so undevoted to home delivery or ipad reading, as to pay that much every morning?

(For the single copy price of 3 months of Heralds, you can get home delivery for a year. For less than 3 weeks of single copy Heralds, you can read the e-edition for a year.)

 

The truth is, we hadn’t noticed. When we checked, though, we discovered that a week ago the newsstand price of the costly local tabloid went from this . . .

 

 

. . . to this.

 

(Newsstand prices for both the Boston Globe and the New York Times are $3 weekdays and $6 Sunday, if you’re keeping score at home.)

While the hike might be startling, it’s hardly surprising. Herald ad revenues are increasingly anemic, and print circulation is deep into its death spiral, as the Boston Business Journal’s redoubtable Don Seiffert reported last month.

The Herald’s print circulation was just under 30,000 as of the first quarter of 2020, with more than half of that from single-copy sales at newsstands around and outside the city. That’s down 46% from four years earlier.

 

Eye-popping chart:

And then there’s this, also from Seiffert’s piece. “The size of the Boston Herald has gone from about 240 employees at the end of 2017, before its purchase by MediaNews Group, to just a few dozen today.”

So to summarize: The value proposition at the skimpy local tabloid seems to be something along the lines of The Boston Herald: You give us more, we’ll give you less.

Law of diminishing returns, anyone?


Editors at New York Times: ‘What’s a Boston Herald?’

May 25, 2020

Yesterday’s jaw-dropping New York Times front page has rightfully been the talk of the media world.

 

 

Also rightfully, the Times cited its sources at the end of the four-page roll call.

 

 

The publications appear in alphabetical order. Here are the B’s.

 

 

You see who’s missing there? That’s right – the Herald.

The hardcounting staff tallied 264 publications nationwide that the Times consulted for biographical details on the 1000 coronavirus victims who peopled yesterday’s list.

But not the Boston Herald (whose print circulation, the Boston Business Journal’s Don Seiffert reported last week, has fallen below 30,000 – down 46% from four years ago).

See our kissin’ cousins at One-Daily Town for further details.


Boston Globe Recycles Work of Other Newsrooms

April 15, 2020

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

Let’s stipulate here that the Boston Globe has done yeoman’s work covering the local coronavirus calamity.

But let’s also acknowledge that the Globeniks have occasionally drafted off the work of other news organizations in the process.

Exhibit A: This Page One Globe story last Saturday.

 

 

Moving piece. No mention, though, of the Boston Herald’s Page One story that ran three days earlier.

 

 

Exhibit B: This piece by Steve Annear in yesterday’s Globe.

Separated by coronavirus, 88-year-old Watertown man uses bucket truck to see wife at nursing home

“They could have lifted me 10 stories and it would not have bothered me,” Nick Avtges said. “As long as I got to see her.”

Up until recently — before everything changed — 88-year-old Nick Avtges would wake up each morning, have his breakfast, and then head out to see his wife, Marion, at the Maristhill Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, where she’s been living for the last year. He would stay with her all day, hardly leaving her side.

“He’s been a very devoted husband,” said James Tracy, president and administrator of the Waltham center. “He never missed a day.”

But in March, as the novel coronavirus continued to spread, posing a critical threat to residents at facilities like the one where Marion, 85, is staying, the center went from reducing its visitations to not allowing visitors at all.

 

Once again, no credit to the original story by Joanna Tzouvelis six days ago in the MetroWest Daily News.

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, lots of other news outlets drafted off the MetroWest story without attribution.

But you’d think the Boston Globe – five days later – would be better than that.

Unfortunately, you’d think wrong.


Boston Herald Quarantined From Full-Page COVADS

April 5, 2020

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff has noted numerous times, the Boston Herald has long been the wallflower at the local advertising dance.

And so it remains in the time of coronavirus.

To be sure, Kappy’s Fine Wine & Spirits has been a loyal customer lately with full-page ads like this one.

 

 

And Stop & Shop ran this thank you ad today.

 

 

But that’s pretty much it for the thirsty local tabloid.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, though (wait – that doesn’t work any more since the Globe moved to State Street and the Herald moved to Braintree and anyway everyone’s working remotely so the hell with it) – the full-page ads are coming fast and furious.

Yesterday there was this ad from the Veterans Cannabis Project urging Gov. Charlie Baker (R-Bogart) to designate all adult-use Massachusetts cannabis dispensaries as essential services.

 

 

Auto magnate Herb Chambers also went full-page yesterday.

 

 

Today is even better for the stately local broadsheet. It got the Chambers ad again and the Stop & Shop thank you ad. But today’s edition also features this Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts ad.

 

 

Body copy:

And this Uber ad.

 

 

Body copy:

 

 

Memo to Blue Cross and Uber: Maybe next time send some of that love to the Herald as well.