Where’s the Boston Globe’s Wayne Woodlief Obit?

August 16, 2017

The redoubtable Wayne Woodlief – a gentleman journalist if there ever was one – died last week at the age of 82.

His Boston Herald colleague Rachelle Cohen wrote a lovely tribute to Wayne this past weekend.

This gentle man, still with a trace of a southern drawl — a legacy of his Virginia roots — always had time to answer a question, to share a bit of political history, to put a harried day into perspective for those who thought they would never make it through to deadline.

There was no “crisis” that the man couldn’t talk you through.

Alzheimer’s robbed us first of the man we all knew — the man who could list all the possible Democratic candidates in the 8th Congressional District race of 1986. Then early yesterday morning, it claimed the rest of him, when he died peacefully in his sleep.

 

Joe Fitzgerald, a Herald columnist who rarely agreed with Wayne politically, also had kind words for him.

We ribbed and teased each other so mercilessly that our friendship began to resemble a comedy routine, especially after this column left its longtime home in sports and moved onto Wayne’s turf, which was politics.

That offered a mother lode of conversational ammunition, since he regarded this writer as something to the right of Attila the Hun while he was seen here as slightly to the left of whatever passes for normal these days.

But you don’t poke fun at someone you don’t like, and Wayne was more than liked here. Indeed, he was admired, so much so that there was no better feeling than knowing you had earned his approval.

 

But . . .

Not a word yet from the Boston Globe.

C’mon, Globeniks – you were quick enough to eulogize WBZ legal eagle Neil Chayet, another local media stalwart who passed away last week.

Do the write thing and give Wayne Woodlief his due.

Advertisements

Boston Globe Lets Local Roofer Rip Off NE Patriots

August 14, 2017

As the hardreading staff perused Saturday’s local dailies, we came across this ad on page 3 of the Boston Globe.

 

 

Upon closer inspection, we noted the wardrobe choices of the Roof Bros.

 

 

Except . . .

There’s nothing in the ad that indicates any affiliation between Northeast Home & Energy and the New England Patriots. Nor is there any mention of the Roof Bros when you plug NE Patriots Official Roofers into the Googletron.

It’s not like the Globe doesn’t know what’s kosher – this ad for an Officially Licensed Product ran in yesterday’s edition.

 

 

So . . .

What’s next, Globeniks?

Burlington Red SocksCeltic sweatersBruin Brew?

Seriously, are you willing to let anyone with a certified check hijack the local sports teams?

Damn.

P.S. The ad also appears in today’s Globe.


Boston Globe Printing Press Just Crushing Things

July 18, 2017

With the departure of Doug Franklin as Boston Globe CEO after only six months on the job, we now have our second casualty of the paper’s new Taunton printing facility. (Tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation.)

The first casualty? The daily baseball scores.

Earlier this month, the Globe ran this note on Page One of the Sports section for over a week.

 

 

Fair enough. But here’s the baseball scoreboard from one of the print editions right before the All Star break..

 

 

Seriously? A ballgame in Philadelphia or New York is a “late game score”?

As for being resolved by mid-July, here’s the scoreboard from today’s print edition:

 

 

Meanwhile, the Boston Herald, which the Globe also prints at its Taunton facility, is suffering the same fate, but has a different solution. The tardy local tabloid just doesn’t list the games whose scores are missing.

 

 

That is so Boston Herald, no?

UPDATE: Sharp-eyed (and -tongued) reader Paul sent this:

Um, the Herald splits the AL and NL scores in print. All the games they “didn’t list” are on the other side of the page.

But I suppose that doesn’t fit your pithy little quip, does it?

 

The hardlyreading staff apologizes for the brain freeze.


Ads ‘n’ Ends From Yesterday’s Boston Dailies

July 13, 2017

Wednesday wasn’t hump day for the local daily newspapers – it was Exceedingly Strange Advertisement Day.

Start with this ad that ran in the Boston Globe Sports section.

Kind of odd, eh? Especially the placement. Sure, divorce is a contact sport, but Globe Sports still seems a bit of a stretch.

Then again, that ad seems downright normal compared to this earlier Globe ad from Pro Vobis (translation: For You, as opposed apparently to For Themselves, which is comforting, at least theoretically).

Now that’s truly bizarre. But, as it happens, not nearly as bizarre as this ad in yesterday’s Boston Herald.

In a former life, the hardreading staff worked at a local ad agency and the above is what we used to call a concept with a capital K.

Here’s the genesis of the problem: Diamonds are priced on the basis of the 4 Cs (Carat, Color, Clarity, and Cut) that were brilliantly invented by the De Beers Group in one of the greatest ad campaigns of all time.

But dental implants don’t slip on as easily as diamond rings. (The hardwincing staff can painfully attest to that.)

So that ad is a bit like turning a kidney stone into a necklace.

Ouch.

Finally, the headscratching staff has seen nine or ten full-page ads in the Herald like this one over the past couple of months.

Music Drives Us describes itself as “a registered 501(c)(3), New England nonprofit organization supplying grants to music programs designed to effect positive change for people of all ages. We seek out organizations and individuals interested in using music as a tool to better the lives of people in all segments of society.”

The driving force behind the group is Ernie Boch Jr., who presumably has spent a lot of money running those ads in the Herald (but not, as far as we can tell, the Globe). Let’s hope those bracelets are selling as well as Boch’s cars do.


Boston Globe Home Delivery Not Yet Gone Chernobyl

June 23, 2017

You splendid readers undoubtedly remember the Great Home Delivery Meltdown from last year when the Boston Globe switched distributors much to the paper’s regret.

This week the Globe not only moved into new downtown digs at 53 State Street, it also switched printing facilities, as Peter Doucette, Chief Consumer Revenue Officer, informed subscribers in an email.

 

 

That was Monday. All went well for three full days. Then came this.

 

 

Indeed, no Globe arrived yesterday at the Global Worldwide Headquarters of Two-Daily Town. When the same email came this morning, the hardreading staff braced itself for more home delivery headaches.

But lo and behold, both papers did arrive today.

So, well done, you former Morrissey Boulevardiers.

And mazel tov on the new home.


Is Sebastian Smee Jumping to the NYT (Part 2)

June 15, 2017

As you splendid readers might recall, the other day we noted this New York Times piece by Boston Globe art critic Sebastian Smee.

 

And we wondered whether Smee – whose Twitter profile describes him as “Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic for the Boston Globe, on leave in Australia for all of 2017” – was just having a summer fling with the Good Grey Lady or was perhaps setting up housekeeping with her.

So we tweeted him thusly:

 

 

We have yet to hear back from the redoubtable Mr. Smee, but we hasten to point out that his Twitter feed conspicuously features the New York Times review of his book, The Art of Rivalry.

 

 

Not Michael Upchurch’s Boston Globe review.

Draw, as it were, your own conclusions.


Is Sebastian Smee Jumping to the New York Times?

June 14, 2017

As the hardreading staff perused our costly print version of the New York Times yesterday, we came across this piece on Page One of the Arts section.

Wait – is that the byline of the Hub’s own Sebastian Smee, Boston Globe Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic?

Indeed it is.

Which got us to wondering: 1) where in the world is Sebastian Smee, given that his last byline in the Globe was back in December; and 2) has he abandoned Boston for the Big Town.

Smee’s Twitter profile seems to answer both questions.

 

 

Regardless, we’ve tweeted the redoubtable Mr. Smee to ask if he has permanently fallen under the spell of the Good Grey Lady.

We will, as always, keep you posted.