Boston Globe Fares Better with Taxi Butterfinger$

July 6, 2016

Very good (samaritan) story in today’s local dailies.

Start with the Boston Herald piece by Jordan Graham and O’Ryan Johnson.

Cops hail cabbie after turning in nearly $200G

Bundles of bills found in bag

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A Boston cabbie is being praised as a good Samaritan after finding and returning a passenger’s inheritance — nearly $200,000 in cold hard cash — accidentally left in the back of his taxi.

“Fifty percent of people say, ‘Yeah, you should have done that.’ The other 50 percent say, ‘You should have took it,’ but I’m not a crook,” said Raymond MacCausland, who found the green backpack filled with approximately $187,000 in cash in his cab on Saturday. “I always return things.”

 

Even the really big ones, apparently.

As for the absent-minded passenger, who told MacCausland he was homeless and moving into a motel, he wasn’t talking – at least to the Herald.

Reached by phone after the money was returned, the passenger declined to comment.

“I’m all set, I’m all set,” he said.

 

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, however, it was a slightly different story in Nestor Ramos’s hands.

[W]hile MacCausland was driving around Back Bay with a small fortune in a tattered backpack, the man to whom the money belonged wasn’t worried.

“I knew he’d find me,” the man said. “I didn’t panic at all.”

 

Beyond that, Ramos also generated this gem:

Standing outside his hotel on Tuesday, the heir said he was going to take a year to recover from many months of homelessness and decades of hard living. He checked into a hotel and was still getting used to not having to hide his meager things from overnight thieves.

After that, he wasn’t sure: He’d been trying to find an apartment, but his credit is disastrous. He says he has more inheritance money coming in the years ahead, but was unsure of the terms.

Eventually, he said, “I’m going to do what I always said I’m going to do: Die in Prague.”

 

Note to Mr. Butterfingers: If you need a taxicab in Prague, check here.


GE Brings No Things (or Ads) to Life at Boston Herald

July 5, 2016

From our bottomless Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff has noted, when General Electric decided to move its corporate headquarters to Boston last April, GE celebrated its migration with this full-page ad in the Boston Globe.

 

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But, as we also noted, GE ignored the Boston Herald.

The [ad’s] small type: “GE and Boston are the perfect combination to usher in a new digital industrial revolution. We’re proud to call the city that never stops making history our new home.”

But, apparently, not proud enough to run its ad in the Boston Herald.

Hey, GEniks: You’re moving to a two-daily town. Show the thirsty local tabloid some love, eh?

 

Since then GE – totally ignoring us – has run a series of full-page ads in the Globe but not the Herald, such as this one in May:

 

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And, in yesterday’s Globe, yet another full-page suck-up.

 

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We’ll say it again:

Hey, GEniks: You’re moving to a two-daily town. Show the thirsty local tabloid some love, eh?


The Boston Globe’s Citgo Sign Conflict of Interest

July 1, 2016

From our Late to the Rescue Party desk

The $tately local broadsheet really needs to get better at full disclosure.

Wednesday’s Boston Globe featured this piece about the impending sale of the Kenmore Square building that the fabled Citgo sign sits upon.

Push to protect the Citgo sign

Commission to consider bid for landmark status

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Despite the Citgo sign’s storied spot on the Boston skyline, there are no city protections to keep it there.

Now, there’s a growing push to change that.

The Boston Landmarks Commission next month will take up a measure that could grant official landmark status to the sign above Kenmore Square. And an online petition supporting that plan received nearly 1,100 signatures in its first four days.

 

Back story: As the hardreading staff has dutifully noted, Boston University plans to sell 660 Beacon Street and several other adjoining buildings, but has has not made keeping the Citgo sign a condition of the sale. So, as the Globe piece reported, the Boston Preservation Alliance has launched a Change.org campaign to save the landmark sign.

But what the Globe piece did not report is that Citgo has run a series of Globe ads extolling the virtues of its sign.

Representative samples:

 

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Rough estimate: At least eight quarter-page ads costing maybe $20,000.

So you say – $20,000? That’s lunch money at the Boston Globe.

True. But it’s lunch money the Globe should mention whenever it covers the Citgo sign rumpus.

Or is that just us.


Globe Relocates Comics Pages Willy-Nilly

June 30, 2016

The hardreading staff is a longtime devotee of Boston Globe comic strips such as Dan Piraro’s Bizarro, Bill Griffith’s Zippy the Pinhead, and Darby Conley’s Get Fuzzy, and we’ve long had a morning routine of reading the Globe Sports section, then turning to the back of the Metro section to read the funny pages.

Until yesterday.

When suddenly – magically! – the comics pages appeared at the back of the Sports section. (D6 and D7 for those of you keeping score at home.)

 

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No advance warning.

No Editor’s note.

No nothing.

And then today – poof! – the comics pages are back at the rear of Metro.

Hey, Globeniks: Some respek, eh?


Why Is AARP Hatin’ on the Boston Herald?

June 29, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

Once again, the thirsty local tabloid gets no love from the full-page-ad set.

Today’s Boston Globe features this costly advertisement from the Massachusetts chapter of AARP.

 

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But nothing in the Boston Herald.

Hey, AARPniks: Old people read the Herald too! (We should know – we’re one of them.)


Politico’s Jack Shafer Cheap-Shots Globe Writers

June 28, 2016

The hardreading staff generally admires media criticism from the peripatetic Jack Shafer, but his latest Politico piece is a little low-hanging-fruitish.

Uh-Oh. Here Come the Brexperts.

Reporters: Don’t know much about Brexit? Don’t let that stop you.

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Who could have predicted that the press harbored so many experts on the repercussions of Brexit? Following Thursday’s vote by the British electorate to leave the European Union, these whizzes crowded the airwaves, clogged the newspapers and swamped their websites with assessments of the breakup’s meaning.

Obviously, some outlets that specialize in finance and cover the Eurozone—like the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal and CNBC—have a handle on the subject; they’d been covering it long before Thursday. But as you stray from these specialists for the generalists, whose job it is to report on whatever Topic A might be that day (weather, politics, infectious disease, baseball), the more the Brexit coverage begins to resemble one long amateur hour.

 

Yeah, except most of journalism is amateur hour: generalists interviewing specialists to cobble together something that sounds vaguely reasonable. And, very often, reasonably vague.

Regardless, here’s Shafer’s Boston Globe nuts-to-you graf:

At the Boston Globe, for example, reporter James Pindell dug deeply into his bag of journalistic clichés last week to deduced that the Brexit vote was “about the economy, stupid” and that if Brexit caused a recession it would “dramatically change the conversation of the presidential race.” No kidding! Michael A. Cohen, a regular on the Globe op-ed page, concluded that it was not David Cameron’s fault Brexit passed, nor was it Jeremy Corbyn’s, nor could it be blamed on the EU elites who pushed immigration. It was “actual voters.” Another astonishing finding.

 

C’mon, Jack – you can do better than to beat up on what’s essentially beat reporting (in every sense of that phrase). Besides, you’re always a lot more interesting when you go after the high-hanging fruit.


AP Corrects Michael Herr Obit; Boston Globe Doesn’t

June 26, 2016

As the hardreading staff has noted, yesterday’s Boston Globe ran this Associated Press obituary of the great Vietnam War chronicler Michael Herr.

 

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As we also noted, Dispatches is not a novel – it’s a splendid example of the literary non-fiction/New Journalism of the ’60s and ’70s. The AP has apparently recognized that, because here’s their obit as picked up by today’s Boston Herald.

 

 

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Oddest thing, though: The Herald’s online version has it both ways.

 

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“Non-fiction novel,” eh? That’s new.

Meanwhile, the Globe still hasn’t amended its online version of the obit.  A novel approach to corrections, eh?


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