Boston Herald Emauls Globe on Brissette Extort Story

May 29, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

For the second straight day the Boston Herald has stiffed the Boston Globe in reporting about the Kenneth Brissette shakedown story.

Let’s start at the beginning, with yesterday’s Page One story in the Globe.

E-mails link Walsh aide to union deal

Stagehands passed festival proposal through Sullivan

A contract requiring the Boston Calling music festival to hire union stagehands in 2014 was submitted for review to a close aide to Mayor Martin J. Walsh during a time when federal prosecutors allege city officials illegally forced the concert organizers to hire unneeded union workers, according to city e-mails released Friday.

The stagehands passed the contract proposal to Boston Calling, a private entity, through Walsh aide Tim Sullivan, according to the e-mails, which were acquired by the Globe through a public records request. In an Aug. 20, 2014 e-mail, the union’s business manager lays out the terms of the agreement and thanks the administration for its assistance.

 

But here’s how yesterday’s Herald handled the story.

INCHES CLOSER TO MARTY

Communications reveal meetings between mayor’s advisers, Boston Calling, BrissetteScreen Shot 2016-05-29 at 1.18.27 PM

A top adviser and close confidante of Mayor Martin J. Walsh was looped into discussions about labor unions with Boston Calling organizers and tourism chief Kenneth Brissette at the same time federal prosecutors say Brissette was strong-arming festival officials to hire union workers, according to newly released emails.

 

“Newly released emails,” eh? Like out of the goodness of Walsh’s heart?

Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld also refers to them as “the newly released emails.” Just dropped out of the sky.

And so we get to today’s edition of the Herald, which features this follow-up referring to – wait for it – “newly released emails.”

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the Herald got its own set of City Hall emails released the other day, in this case over the Top Chef rumpus, as yesterday’s edition reported.

A livid TV production staffer warned a city tourism official that Boston was at risk of being blacklisted over heavy-handed union tactics, according to newly released emails.

The scores of emails, obtained by the Herald in a public records request, show the inner workings of the Boston Office of Tourism, Sports and Entertainment that was headed by Kenneth Brissette.

 

The Globe, as far as we can tell (because the Globe’s search engine is worse than useless), did not pick up on that story. Let’s hope if the lately local broadsheet does, it’ll show better manners than the dodgy local tabloid.


Citgo Throws a Few Pennies at the Boston Herald

May 15, 2016

As the hardreading staff has noted on numerous occasions, Citgo has lately been running quarter-page ads in the Boston Globe celebrating its Kenmore Square sign, whose future is uncertain now that Boston University is looking to sell the buildings beneath it.

Representative sample:

 

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We’ve asked Citgo’s public affairs manager Fernando Garay why the company doesn’t run ads in the Boston Herald, but he’s been a private affairs manager to us, not deigning to respond to multiple inquiries.

However . . .

Splendid reader Sam Doran has sent us this:

The print Herald may be thirsty for Citgo Sign ads, but CyberHerald’s got them. I just noticed a banner at the top of the mobile site. Two screenshots are attached. Tapping the banner led to bostoncitgosign.com (second screenshot).

 

Said screenshots:

 

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Of course, it costs pennies on the (print) dollar for Boston Herald digital ads, but no doubt the thirsty local tabloid is thankful for whatever Citgo sends its way.

Still, Citgo’s sign to the Herald (and Two-Daily Town) remains . . . the middle finger.


Big Power Outage at Boston Herald

May 13, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

Another day, another dolor for the thirsty local tabloid, which once again gets the air – not the ad – in a local public policy tussle.

This time it’s the Environmental League of Massachusetts and the Conservation Law Foundation that have teamed up to run an ad in today’s Boston Globe (but not the Herald) addressing Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo about energy policy in the Bay State.

 

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Memo to George Bachrach and Brad Campbell:

What, it would have killed you to run a half-page ad in the Herald?

Or did you just run out of gas?


Hark! The Herald! (Cohen After WashPost Edition)

May 11, 2016

From our Walt Whitman desk

Call it the fisty local tabloid, ’cause the punches are flyin’ today.

It all started with this Callum Borchers piece in yesterday’s Washington Post.

Pundits achieve cable-news stardom after converting into Donald Trump supporters

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 12.38.41 PM

Last summer, shortly after Donald Trump launched his angry missile of a campaign with that memorable remark about Mexicans and rapists, Kayleigh McEnany sounded like pretty much every other talking head on cable news.

“I think he said something very unartful, very inappropriate,” she told Don Lemon during a June 29 segment on “CNN Tonight.”

“I’m here to tell you, he’s not going to be anywhere near the top five,” McEnany added. “He’s not a serious contender within the Republican Party. And I think he made that pretty clear when the most important thing he said in his speech was, ‘I am rich, I am rich,’ repeatedly.”

Today, McEnany sounds very different — both from her earlier self and from better-known conservative commentators such as Karl Rove and S.E. Cupp, who remain highly critical of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. McEnany is now a staunch Trump supporter, a turnaround that has helped make the newly minted Harvard Law School graduate a rising star on CNN . . .

 

McEnany, Borchers writes, “is one of a small handful of commentators — including Jeffrey Lord, Scottie Nell Hughes, Adriana Cohen and Carl Higbie — who have made defending the real estate mogul their niche and in the process made themselves hot commodities.”

And hot under the collar, in Cohen’s case. The Boston Herald columnist fired back at Borchers in today’s edition.

D.C. hit job ignores facts

Post piece demeans female pundits who back Trump

If you want to see what the war on women looks like, you need look no further than The Washington Post.Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 1.39.38 PM

To be more specific, the war on conservative women.

Because I have dared to write supportive opinion columns on Donald Trump, I was featured along with two other female commentators in a Post story that stated that I have “achieved cable-news stardom after converting” into a Donald Trump supporter, that I, along with the others, “have made defending the real estate mogul their niche and in the process made themselves hot commodities.”

 

Cohen says despite Borchers’ claim that she was an “occasional guest” on CNN, Fox News Channel, and Fox Business Network “before getting behind Trump,” she actually appeared on national TV and radio shows “at least 100 times over the past few years, long before writing columns backing Trump and his positions this February.”

Cohen does not, however, address this part of Borchers’ piece:

On March 25, during a live segment on CNN, [Cohen] brought up a National Enquirer story that alleged multiple extramarital affairs by Cruz — unsubstantiated rumors that the mainstream media had mostly ignored until then. As anchor Kate Bolduan shook her head, Cohen went a step further, asserting on live TV that fellow guest Amanda Carpenter, Cruz’s former communications director, had been identified as one of five mistresses.

 

Ouch.

One last point: As Cohen points out, some of the comments attached to Borchers’ piece are brutally misogynistic. But during this election season, that’s par for the course. Trump supporters or no.


Citgo Sign to Two-Daily Town: The Middle Finger

May 5, 2016

As the hardreading staff has noted over the past week or so, Citgo has been running ads in the Boston Globe (but not the Boston Herald) celebrating the landmark Kenmore Square  Citgo sign, which might be endangered when Boston University sells the buildings beneath it.

Here’s yesterday’s installment of the feel-good ads.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 12.47.28 PM

 

When the ads first appeared, we contacted Citgo’s public affairs manager Fernando Garay, who said he’d be glad to answer a few questions via email. So we sent him this:

Thanks for getting back to [us] so quickly, Mr. Garay.

A few questions:

Are the Boston Globe ads indeed tied to the uncertain future of the Citgo sign?

What kind of response did you get to the ads?

Have you run ads in other media outlets? Did you consider running these two in the Boston Herald?

Do you have plans to run ads in the future or expand your social media efforts beyond #CITGOsign on Twitter?

Thank you [and etc.].

 

No reply.

So we queried again.

No reply.

Finally, we sent this last night:

Dear Mr. Garay,

All due respect, but if you weren’t willing to answer [our] questions about the Citgo sign ads in the Boston Globe, why did you say “Please send me your questions via email and I will get back to you with responses”?

For the third time, [our] questions:

Are the Boston Globe ads indeed tied to the uncertain future of the Citgo sign?

What kind of response have you gotten to the ads?

Have you run ads in other media outlets? Did you consider running any in the Boston Herald?

Do you have plans to run ads in the future or expand your social media efforts beyond #CITGOsign on Twitter?

Sincerely,

[The hardreading staff]

 

Citgo: Proud to touch so many lives. Just not to answer any questions about it.


Boston LNG Pipeline Protest: Little Noise Generated

May 4, 2016

From our What the Frack? desk

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, a tree-hugging consortium called Consumers for Sensible Energy has been insensibly spending tens of thousands of dollars on ads in the Boston Globe to little or no effect.

Here’s the group’s ad opposing a new pipeline and Liquified Natural Gas facility for Eastern Massachusetts.

 

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Yesterday, they took their message to the State House steps in Boston, also to little or no effect. The  protest got some coverage in the Salem News and the Berkshire Eagle,   but a long MassLive story about the Senate’s climate committee hearing yesterday made no mention of the protest. The Boston Globe and Boston Herald had nothing about any of it.

Even worse was the deafening silence on social media: The protest generated exactly one tweet at #StopThePipelineTax, the hashtag the group has spent all that ad money publicizing.

 

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Plug “Consumers for Sensible Energy” into the Twitter search box and you get exactly zero tweets about the protest.

Memo to Consumers for (All Those Dollars and No) Sensible Energy: Next time, just set your money on fire.


Boston Herald Still the Thirsty Local Tabloid for Ads

May 4, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

The Boston Herald has long been the venue of last resort for full-page ads of the advocacy/corporate image/memorial sort.

As it was yesterday, when the Herald was bypassed by two ads that ran in the Boston Globe.

First, this Boston suck-up ad from GE (which in this town stands for Got Everything.)

 

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Then, this Boston Ad Club full-page backpat honoring diversity in a town that has long hampered diversity.

 

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(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, yesterday’s Herald did feature this full-page bank ad.

 

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As well as this half-page Massachusetts tax amnesty ad.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 1.09.25 AM

 

Neither of which ran in yesterday’s Globe.

Still, there’s no question that the Herald is an afterthought in the eyes of local advertisers.

Which makes it all the more interesting that the feisty local tabloid seems to enjoy better fiscal fitness than the stately local broadsheet, which is now desperately downsizing (tip o’ the pixel to the redoubtable Dan Kennedy at Media Nation) as it moves from its sprawling Morrissey Boulevard home to cramped quarters in Boston’s financial district.

So who’s really at a disadvantage, eh?