104 Bay State Groups Call Out Boston Calling Verdict

September 16, 2019

Last month Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan – former aides to Boston Mayor Marty Walsh – were convicted in federal court on charges of extortion and conspiracy to commit extortion (both for Brissette, the latter for Sullivan) for their 2014 arm-twisting of the Boston Calling music festival to hire union workers.

Those verdicts led to a flurry of hand-wringing, as a quick search of the Googletron reveals.

 

 

Now comes this two-page ad that a gaggle of advocacy groups ranging from the A. Philip Randolph Institute to the Worcester Interfaith Coalition ran in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

 

 

(The same spread ran in yesterday’s Boston Herald just harder to read.)

Anyway, here’s the nut graf.

 

 

The hardreading staff is the first to admit that our legal knowledge comes entirely from the Jerry Orbach School of Law, but aren’t gender, race, and religion sort of protected classes in Massachusetts? And aren’t unions, well, not?

Regardless, back to that Google search above. Look closely and you’ll see one dissenting voice among the pearl-clutchers: Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi, who filed this piece in the wake of the Boston Calling verdicts.

Democracy chilled by campaign against Boston Calling verdict

You know what has a chilling effect on democracy?

Telling concert organizers if they don’t hire union workers they don’t need or want, the City of Boston won’t give them a permit for their event.

That’s what a federal jury found Kenneth Brissette and Timothy Sullivan, two city hall officials, guilty of doing. But in a bizarre twist of logic, some 70 nonprofit organizations, representing environmental, LGBTQ, housing, senior, education, and civil rights advocates, are calling out the verdict as a democracy slayer. Ten Boston city councilors also signed a statement, decrying the case as a “grievous misuse of limited prosecutorial resources in service of a misguided political agenda” and “a terrible precedent.”

Really?

 

Read the whole piece. It’s an effective chaser to the shot taken in yesterday’s double-trucks.


Local Union’s Ad Falls in Herald, Doesn’t Make Sound

September 4, 2019

Memo to IBEW Local 103: Next time, just set your money on fire.

Because this time, the local chapter of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers spent its dough promoting, well, womanhood with this full-page ad in today’s Boston Herald.

 

 

Body copy:

 

 

This disclaimer appeared at the bottom of the ad: “Paid for by IBEW Local 103. We are not asking any individual to stop performing any work or services, or to refuse to pick up, deliver, handle, or transport any goods.”

Don’t want to get confused with the recent labor-related mishegas at Boston City Hall, now do we?

Either way, here’s the thing: Does anyone at Wellesley College actually read the Herald?

Our educated guess is . . . no.

As for #WhatAboutMeWellesley, a search of that hashtag yields exactly four tweets, the most recent one from June 8.

New memo to IBEW Local 103: If you include a hashtag in your full-page newspaper ad, at least put something there yourselves.

Y’know?

 


Boston Herald Emauls Globe on Brissette Extort Story

May 29, 2016

From our No Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

For the second straight day the Boston Herald has stiffed the Boston Globe in reporting about the Kenneth Brissette shakedown story.

Let’s start at the beginning, with yesterday’s Page One story in the Globe.

E-mails link Walsh aide to union deal

Stagehands passed festival proposal through Sullivan

A contract requiring the Boston Calling music festival to hire union stagehands in 2014 was submitted for review to a close aide to Mayor Martin J. Walsh during a time when federal prosecutors allege city officials illegally forced the concert organizers to hire unneeded union workers, according to city e-mails released Friday.

The stagehands passed the contract proposal to Boston Calling, a private entity, through Walsh aide Tim Sullivan, according to the e-mails, which were acquired by the Globe through a public records request. In an Aug. 20, 2014 e-mail, the union’s business manager lays out the terms of the agreement and thanks the administration for its assistance.

 

But here’s how yesterday’s Herald handled the story.

INCHES CLOSER TO MARTY

Communications reveal meetings between mayor’s advisers, Boston Calling, BrissetteScreen Shot 2016-05-29 at 1.18.27 PM

A top adviser and close confidante of Mayor Martin J. Walsh was looped into discussions about labor unions with Boston Calling organizers and tourism chief Kenneth Brissette at the same time federal prosecutors say Brissette was strong-arming festival officials to hire union workers, according to newly released emails.

 

“Newly released emails,” eh? Like out of the goodness of Walsh’s heart?

Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld also refers to them as “the newly released emails.” Just dropped out of the sky.

And so we get to today’s edition of the Herald, which features this follow-up referring to – wait for it – “newly released emails.”

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, the Herald got its own set of City Hall emails released the other day, in this case over the Top Chef rumpus, as yesterday’s edition reported.

A livid TV production staffer warned a city tourism official that Boston was at risk of being blacklisted over heavy-handed union tactics, according to newly released emails.

The scores of emails, obtained by the Herald in a public records request, show the inner workings of the Boston Office of Tourism, Sports and Entertainment that was headed by Kenneth Brissette.

 

The Globe, as far as we can tell (because the Globe’s search engine is worse than useless), did not pick up on that story. Let’s hope if the lately local broadsheet does, it’ll show better manners than the dodgy local tabloid.