Local Union’s Ad Falls in Herald, Doesn’t Make Sound

September 4, 2019

Memo to IBEW Local 103: Next time, just set your money on fire.

Because this time, the local chapter of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers spent its dough promoting, well, womanhood with this full-page ad in today’s Boston Herald.

 

 

Body copy:

 

 

This disclaimer appeared at the bottom of the ad: “Paid for by IBEW Local 103. We are not asking any individual to stop performing any work or services, or to refuse to pick up, deliver, handle, or transport any goods.”

Don’t want to get confused with the recent labor-related mishegas at Boston City Hall, now do we?

Either way, here’s the thing: Does anyone at Wellesley College actually read the Herald?

Our educated guess is . . . no.

As for #WhatAboutMeWellesley, a search of that hashtag yields exactly four tweets, the most recent one from June 8.

New memo to IBEW Local 103: If you include a hashtag in your full-page newspaper ad, at least put something there yourselves.

Y’know?

 


Boston Globe Red Lines Boston Herald on China Cars

October 22, 2014

Start at the start:

Last Saturday’s Boston Herald featured this front page:

 

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The story inside (as the hardreading staff noted at the time):

Activists want T bid derailed

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Human rights and labor activists are voicing outrage that the Patrick administration could soon award a staggering $1.3 billion subway contract to a rail enterprise owned by the repressive Communist Chinese government, saying the deal would be a “terrible disgrace.”

“If the left-leaning Massachusetts blue staters love to boycott things that break the wrong way on issues of rights, why does China get a pass on all of that?” said Tom Cushman, a human rights activist and professor at Wellesley College.

“If this were an entity that was known to be hostile toward transgendered people or gay people or who violated the rights of minorities, people would be up in arms over a contract like this. But (they) do all those things. They are hostile toward all those people, but China doesn’t register on the screen of the morally outraged.”

 

Now comes the Boston Globe with this front page piece in yesterday’s edition.

T job’s top bid is from China

Subway car plan draws concerns on human rights

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A railcar and locomotive manufacturer controlled by China’s government has emerged as the top bidder for a $566.6 million contract to supply the MBTA with new cars for the Red and Orange lines.

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation board of directors is scheduled to vote Wednesday on the contract for CNR MA Corporation, which is a venture of China CNR Corporation Limited and CNR Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., according to the board’s agenda.

The contract for 284 subway cars will include the construction of an assembly plant in Springfield, according to a person with knowledge of the contract. The MBTA said last year it expected to begin delivering Orange Line cars in the winter of 2018, and the Red Line cars in the fall of 2019.

 

The Globe piece has a number of new details, but nowhere does it credit the Herald for catching this train first.

Bad form, Globeniks. Bad form.


China Dole in Boston Dailies

October 18, 2014

Money and the People’s Republic get front-page headlines in today’s local dailies. Start with this colorful one in the Boston Herald.

 

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Nice. The story inside:

Activists want T bid derailed

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Human rights and labor activists are voicing outrage that the Patrick administration could soon award a staggering $1.3 billion subway contract to a rail enterprise owned by the repressive Communist Chinese government, saying the deal would be a “terrible disgrace.”

“If the left-leaning Massachusetts blue staters love to boycott things that break the wrong way on issues of rights, why does China get a pass on all of that?” said Tom Cushman, a human rights activist and professor at Wellesley College.

“If this were an entity that was known to be hostile toward transgendered people or gay people or who violated the rights of minorities, people would be up in arms over a contract like this. But (they) do all those things. They are hostile toward all those people, but China doesn’t register on the screen of the morally outraged.”

 

Well, it does at the railsy local tabloid.

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, it’s an entirely different business on Page One.

MGH in talks for hospital in China

massgen

Massachusetts General Hospital is in early discussions with two partners to build a full-service hospital with 500 to 1,000 beds in China, a country that is struggling to meet growing demand from its 1.4 billion citizens for top-quality medical care.

Mass. General signed a “framework agreement’’ last week with a Chinese hospital that specializes in traditional medicine and a Chinese investment firm, allowing the three parties to exchange financial information and work on developing a definitive agreement to open a facility in an island city close to Hong Kong.

Mass. General executives called the talks preliminary and said they have not made a final decision about whether to participate in the project, but that they hope to do so by next summer.

 

So both these deals are still up in the air. Plenty of opportunity for the Chinese checkers to do their damnedest.


Dear Boston Globe: Meet Rick Berman

March 12, 2014

Chalk up another win for Dr. Evil.

From yesterday’s Boston Globe:

Ad attacks ‘radical’ backers of minimum-pay hike

In wage fight, echoes of the Cold War

 

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Wellesley College economics professor Julie Matthaei is a Marxist living in a modern-day commune in Cambridge who has carved out an academic niche questioning the status quo. She is unapologetic about her beliefs, describing herself on her Wellesley Web page as a “Marxist-feminist-anti-racist-ecological-economist.”

But she was stunned recently when this description was used against her in a full-page advertisement in The New York Times by a murky pro-business group opposed to raising the minimum wage. Matthaei was among 600 academic economists who signed a petition supporting a minimum-wage increase, which the ad tried to discredit.

 

The Times ad:

 

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The Globe piece noted that “[t]he Times ad, taken out by the nonprofit Employment Policies Institute in Washington, had a distinctly 1950s flavor, employing excerpts from quotes that used derivatives of ‘Marx’ four times, praised Soviet-style socialism, and questioned official accounts of the Sept. 11 attacks.”

It also noted this:

It is unclear who is funding the Employment Policies Institute; research director Michael Saltsman declined to name the businesses, foundations, and individuals who are major donors.

 

It might be hard to name “the businesses, foundations, and individuals who are major donors” of the Employment Policies Institute, but it’s totally clear who’s behind it: the Berman-industrial complex detailed here.

Hey, Globeniks: Get hip – Rick Berman is the King of Potemkin non-profits.

Helpful cheat sheet:

 

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You’re welcome.