So Far #StopThePipelineTax Is Totally Out of Gas

May 3, 2016

As the hardreading staff noted yesterday, a cabal of tree-huggers called Consumers for Sensible Energy has been running this ad in the Boston Globe.

 

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The objective is to derail Spectra Energy’s Access Northeast project, “which would expand and add new pipeline from West Boylston to Weymouth and down to Acushnet. It calls for the construction of a massive liquefied natural gas facility and new compressor station on the South Coast and South Shore.”

But #StopThePipelineTax has so far been a bust, drawing “No Results” a day after the group’s first ad ran, and only this a day (and another ad) later.

 

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So, to recap: One-half of the responses to this six-figure ad campaign have come from . . . us.

Consumers for (All Those Dollars and No) Sensible Energy has scheduled a State House rally at 11:30 today.

We’ll let you know how it goes.

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Is #StopThePipelineTax Already Out of Gas?

May 2, 2016

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

An outfit called Consumers for Sensible Energy ran this ad in the Boston Sunday Globe yesterday (but not the Boston Herald).

 

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The body copy:

 

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CFSE appears to be a consortium of every local non-profit that’s ever hugged a tree. From their Allies page:

 

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Here’s the issue, according to the group’s website:

Last Week, Kinder Morgan announced that it has suspended its Northeast Energy Direct pipeline project to import fracked gas from Pennsylvania to New England and to connect to export terminals in Canada for shipment overseas.

That was great news, but it is only half the story. There is a second pipeline company proposing to import more fracked gas. And, once again consumers would pay for the $3 billion cost, with a monthly pipeline tax on their bills.

Spectra Energy has proposed its Access Northeast project, which would expand and add new pipeline from West Boylston to Weymouth and down to Acushnet. It calls for the construction of a massive liquefied natural gas facility and new compressor station on the South Coast and South Shore.

 

Among the Bad News Bearers about the other half of the story was this Globe piece last week.

Weymouth mayor continues talks with Spectra Energy despite local objection

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Mayor Robert Hedlund says he’s talking to Spectra Energy about a mitigation package involving millions of dollars for the town if the company builds a natural-gas compressor station near the Fore River Bridge — despite his opposition to the project and calls from local residents to stop the talks.

“It would be irresponsible not to talk with them,” Hedlund said in a phone interview Tuesday. “We’re backed into a corner.”

The offer calls for a $12 million payment in the fall of 2016, followed by another $1 million annually for the next 14 years, and potentially more in property tax adjustments, according to Hedlund’s office.

Hedlund said attorneys for the town advised him that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission did not appear to be swayed by Weymouth’s concerns that the compressor station posed a safety threat — and would probably approve Spectra’s plans soon. The federal agency has ultimate authority over the project.

 

Understandably, Consumers for Sensible Energy wants to mobilize the opposition quickly, so its website billboarded this.

 

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Ever diligent, the hardtweeting staff checked #StopThePipelineTax on Twitter and here’s what we found at 12 o’clock this morning.

 

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Just to be clear: 18 hours after their five-figure Boston Globe ad hit the front doors of 220,000 Greater Bostonians, Consumers for (Dollars But No) Sensible Energy had generated up to zero responses on social media.

All due respect, but what the frack?


SaveTheFood Campaign Now on Boston Herald’s Plate

May 1, 2016

As the hardreading staff recently noted, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Ad Council have teamed up to run an ad campaign with the theme Save the Food, urging people to reduce food waste.

The partnership has run newspaper ads such as this one . . .

 

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. . . and this one . . .

 

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. . . both of which ran in the Boston Globe last week.

But not the Boston Herald.

So we sent this email to the Ad Council:

Dear Sir or Madam,

[We] noted with interest the ads you’ve run the past two days in the Boston Globe. But not the Boston Herald.

[We] know the ads you produce virtually always run pro bono, so just wondering: Did you not ask the Herald to run them, or did you ask and the paper decline?

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
[The hardreading staff]

 

No reply.

Then, suddenly, this half-page ad ran in yesterday’s hungry local tabloid.

 

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So: Either the Ad Council finally asked, or the Herald finally agreed to run the ad pro bono.

Coincidence?

We defer to Leroy Jethro Gibbs’s Rule 39  (at 1:52) to answer that.

 

 


Boston Herald Knows Where IndyCar Is Driving Next

May 1, 2016

Or maybe it doesn’t.

When the Not So Grand Prix of Boston crashed and burned on Friday, the Globe’s Mark Arsenault reported this in Saturday’s edition:

IndyCar race in Boston screeches to a halt

Labor Day event scratched, as promoters criticize city’s ‘ridiculous’ demands

Promoters of an IndyCar race in the Seaport this September are peeling out of Boston and will not race in the Screen Shot 2016-05-01 at 2.16.30 AMcity.

“The relationship between us and the city is not working,” said John Casey, president of what had been called the Grand Prix of Boston, in a Globe interview Friday. “The relationship is untenable.” . . .

Instead, the promoters will turn to Plan B and try to hold a Labor Day race in a backup city in the Northeast, Casey said. The promoters have had contact with two other cities, he said, one of which is in New England.

“They are both willing to do it without the headaches of Boston,” he said, declining to name the cities.

 

Cut to: Saturday’s Boston Herald, where the totally Grand Prix driven Joe Battenfeld reported this:

Mayor crashes and burns as IndyCar waves red flag

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Mayor Martin J. Walsh was behind the wheel of the Grand Prix of Boston and got burned by its fiery crash, ignoring a series of repeated wrong turns and warning signs that the race would never get off the starting line.

Walsh’s administration spent a year pushing an idea that seemed ludicrous to many Bostonians: hosting a high-speed IndyCar race in a city that can’t even fill potholes or sync up its traffic lights.

 

No kidding – it’s like Joe Cocker has timed the traffic lights in Boston.

Regardless, here’s Battenfeld’s money quote:

Casey gave all the race vendors, consultants and attorneys a similar brusque sendoff, writing: “Thank you for your work. Pencils down” — another way of saying: I’m not paying you any more.

Then Casey let it be known he was taking his speedy race cars to a city that really wanted them: Providence.

 

Chalk up one more checkered flag for the racy local tabloid.

Except . . .

Today’s Herald spins out a bit.

Casey and his group now will look for another city to host the race. Providence has for years been rumored to be on the verge of an agreement to host an IndyCar race.

Though Emily Crowell, spokeswoman for Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza, said nothing has been finalized.

“IndyCar has not applied for any permits or made arrangements to relocate the race yet,” Crowell said, “but we’re open to having a conversation to see if Providence is the right fit for 
their event.”

 

Sounds like Providence is about to have a Hub of a time with the Little Indy That Couldn’t, eh?