Boston Herald Knows Where IndyCar Is Driving Next

May 1, 2016

Or maybe it doesn’t.

When the Not So Grand Prix of Boston crashed and burned on Friday, the Globe’s Mark Arsenault reported this in Saturday’s edition:

IndyCar race in Boston screeches to a halt

Labor Day event scratched, as promoters criticize city’s ‘ridiculous’ demands

Promoters of an IndyCar race in the Seaport this September are peeling out of Boston and will not race in the Screen Shot 2016-05-01 at 2.16.30 AMcity.

“The relationship between us and the city is not working,” said John Casey, president of what had been called the Grand Prix of Boston, in a Globe interview Friday. “The relationship is untenable.” . . .

Instead, the promoters will turn to Plan B and try to hold a Labor Day race in a backup city in the Northeast, Casey said. The promoters have had contact with two other cities, he said, one of which is in New England.

“They are both willing to do it without the headaches of Boston,” he said, declining to name the cities.


Cut to: Saturday’s Boston Herald, where the totally Grand Prix driven Joe Battenfeld reported this:

Mayor crashes and burns as IndyCar waves red flag

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Mayor Martin J. Walsh was behind the wheel of the Grand Prix of Boston and got burned by its fiery crash, ignoring a series of repeated wrong turns and warning signs that the race would never get off the starting line.

Walsh’s administration spent a year pushing an idea that seemed ludicrous to many Bostonians: hosting a high-speed IndyCar race in a city that can’t even fill potholes or sync up its traffic lights.


No kidding – it’s like Joe Cocker has timed the traffic lights in Boston.

Regardless, here’s Battenfeld’s money quote:

Casey gave all the race vendors, consultants and attorneys a similar brusque sendoff, writing: “Thank you for your work. Pencils down” — another way of saying: I’m not paying you any more.

Then Casey let it be known he was taking his speedy race cars to a city that really wanted them: Providence.


Chalk up one more checkered flag for the racy local tabloid.

Except . . .

Today’s Herald spins out a bit.

Casey and his group now will look for another city to host the race. Providence has for years been rumored to be on the verge of an agreement to host an IndyCar race.

Though Emily Crowell, spokeswoman for Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza, said nothing has been finalized.

“IndyCar has not applied for any permits or made arrangements to relocate the race yet,” Crowell said, “but we’re open to having a conversation to see if Providence is the right fit for 
their event.”


Sounds like Providence is about to have a Hub of a time with the Little Indy That Couldn’t, eh?


Olympicgeddon at Boston Herald!

July 27, 2015

From our Five-Ring Monte desk

According to Joe Dwinell’s piece in Sunday’s Boston Herald, it’s all over but the pouting for the Store 2024 Olympic bid.

Bid at Breaking Point

USOC could vote tomorrow

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The USOC will meet tomorrow on Boston’s shaky bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics, where one board member told the Herald she won’t be surprised if the 17-day, $4.6 billion plan comes up for a fateful vote.

“We need to know how (Boston) is doing and if the people of the city are interested in hosting the games,” said Anita L. DeFrantz, a member of both the United States Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee.

“We need to get a report. I need to know,” DeFrantz told the Herald yesterday, voicing doubt about support for the games in the Hub . . .

As for speculation Los Angeles is poised to step in if the USOC backs away from Boston, DeFrantz said “L.A. is perpetually ready. It can host with only two years’ notice.”



Crosstown at the Boston Sunday Globe, Mark Arsenault’s story was of course more nuanced.

USOC prods Baker, Walsh to help lift Olympic bid

The US Olympic Committee is pressing Governor Charlie Baker and Mayor Martin J. Walsh to put more of their political capital behind Boston’s struggling bid for the 2024 Olympic Games, but neither politician appears ready to satisfy the USOC, according to a person close to the bid process.

With USOC members set to discuss Boston’s status at a board meeting Monday, the standoff raises new questions about the fate of a bid already in peril due to low poll numbers.

USOC members want the popular governor to endorse the bid, the person close to the process said, which could breathe new life and credibility into the city’s effort.

The board is also pressuring Walsh, an Olympic backer, to announce that he will sign the host city contract required by the International Olympic Committee, which would put city taxpayers on the hook if the Games ran short of money or suffered cost overruns, the person said.


Not gonna happen, according to Arsenault’s report.

More to come, obviously, today.

Five-Ring Monte: Boston Herald Is on the Money in Olympic Salary Flap

March 10, 2015

The local dailies are currently on Boston 2024, the high-rolling Olympic wannabe outfit, like Brown on Williamson – especially in the matter of who’s getting paid what.

Today Boston hits the Dailies Double, with both papers front-paging the buckraking at the Olympic trough.

Boston Globe:

Olympic bid panel offers salary data

Patrick to earn $7,500 per day during travels

Former governor Deval Patrick will earn $7,500 a day for occasional travel as a global ambassador for Boston’s Olympic bid, selling the city and its vision for the Games to the International Olympic Committee, according to salary data released Monday by local 0109patrickOlympic planners, who say they do not know how often Patrick would be on the job.

The local Olympic bid committee, Boston 2024, which is funded by private donations, is also paying $1,390,500 in annual staff salary, with six of 10 salaried employees making more than $100,000 a year. Chief executive Rich Davey topped the list at $300,000.


Mark Arsenault’s piece features other hauls as well: “Boston 2024 is paying $44,000 a month to communications consultants, including $15,000 each to Northwind Strategies — overseen by former Patrick aide Doug Rubin — and Keyser Public Strategies, whose president, Will Keyser, was a key strategist in Governor Charlie Baker’s winning campaign.”

And: “The committee also has monthly contracts, for $10,000 each, with William Coyne Jr. and Jack Hart — well-connected lobbyists with South Boston ties.”

And: “Nikko Mendoza, who was Patrick’s director of operations, is vice president for engagement and external affairs, making $120,000 a year, according to Boston 2024.”

That’s a lotta dough-re-mi, eh?

Crosstown at the Boston Herald, it gets even worse.


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Inside, the fiscally local tabloid features this handy clip ‘n’ save pay sheet:


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Do we see a pattern emerging here? Boston 2024 operates clandestinely, local media force the issue on some issue, Boston 2024 forks over some information. Time to stock up on crowbars.