Boston Herald for Sale, Price Is Right for Globe

October 28, 2018

When the costly local tabloid arrived at the Global Worldwide Headquarters this morning, the front page of Sunday Sports blared out this:

STAY ON SCHEDULE

Silverman: Red Sox stick to plan,

save Sale for Game 5

 

Said Michael Silverman piece ran on page 3.

 

 

Except . . . this Peter Abraham piece is more like it.

 

 

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, the Herald got it all sorted out eventually, as the paper’s website and E-Edition indicate. But that sure doesn’t help the lowly home subscriber, now does it?

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John Henry Flirts with Boston Herald – Again!

August 11, 2014

As the hardreading staff noted a couple of weeks ago, Boston GlobeSox owner John Henry is having a fling with his crosstown rival in a series of email exchanges with Herald sports scribe Michael Silverman.

First he used the frisky local tabloid to dopeslap his star sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy over his dismissal of Red Sox Nation’s unswerving devotion to the Olde Towne Team.

Yesterday, Henry opened the kimono a bit more in Silverman’s Baseball Notes column. About meddling with the Globe’s sports coverage, Henry said this:

“I don’t get involved at all with baseball coverage,” Henry said. “That would be completely inappropriate. I did get involved in pushing for Score, which was a standalone NFL section we created, and they did a terrific job on that. I’d like to see more coverage of the IN4Z7200.JPGRevolution because I think they are becoming a more important part of the community. Soccer is becoming more important as evidenced by the reception Liverpool [the soccer club Henry owns]  received here (at Fenway) this year. But I haven’t said anything to our editor or sports editor . . .

“I have not initiated a single discussion on the Sox, Liverpool or baseball. There are other areas I attend to; it’s a complicated, diverse business that is radically changing. It’s an important asset of the community.”

 

Translation: I don’t want to control sports coverage – I want to control sports coverage advertising.

Silverman’s Globe-go-nuts grafs:

Boston remains a two-newspaper town, a vanishing species around the country. The healthy competition between the Globe and the Herald, including but not limited to local and regional news and sports, is a boon for readers. That the Globe now uses its excess printing capacity to print the Herald highlights the changing economic realities of the two newspapers. Each strives to give its readers the best coverage possible, from the Red Sox to Beacon Hill. When it comes to sports coverage, Henry sees ESPN as the Globe’s chief competition — but with a caveat.

“In sports, the Globe competes on the Web with everyone,” Henry said. “You are one click away from the best in the world in every area. ESPN is what we are up against in sports. But you also have the damn Herald.”

You’re welcome.

 

Hey, Globeniks: Flirty local tabloid on Line 1.


John Henry Uses Herald to Whack Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy

July 27, 2014

The Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman got an email interview with Boston GlobeSox owner John Henry, which, of course, was Page One news for the feisty local tabloid.

 

Screen Shot 2014-07-27 at 2.33.48 PM

 

The email exchange between Silverman and Henry was pretty much what you’d expect.

Henry takes stock of perplexing Sox

The Red Sox are genuinely perplexed.

Barely more than two weeks ago, principal owner John Henry was told by his general manager that the Red Sox “are probably the IN4Z7200.JPGbest team in the division. We just aren’t playing like it.”

The reasons behind the team’s incredibly underwhelming and disappointing caliber of play for most of the first four months of the season are not clear to Henry and the front office. With the trade deadline looming Thursday, Henry and his baseball operations people have been trying to get a better handle on what’s gone wrong and discover if there’s time left to fix it.

 

It’s not exactly riveting stuff – when Silverman asks if the Sox are sellers or buyers, Henry replies, “We’ll see what happens (this) week.”

Ya think?

But there is one juicy item in the piece: A not-so-veiled reference to this from Boston Globe scribe (and Henry employee) Dan Shaughnessy last Sunday (reproduced in full for, well, full effect).

When did Boston go so soft on the Red Sox?

At this hour, your Boston Red Sox enjoy a friendlier environment than almost any of the 30 teams in baseball. The Sox have a chance to finish in last place for the second time in three years, win a playoff game in only one of six seasons, and still be perceived by their fans as “perennial contenders.’’ The Sox can play nine games under .500 for the first 95 games and still have a Nation of believers thinking they can win the division, or compete for the phony second wild card. Sox owners can pare payroll ($72.5 million scheduled to come off the books for next year), stay well below the coveted luxury tax threshold, and listen to regional applause while fans pay the highest ticket prices in baseball. The Sox can get folks to buy into the notion that it’s foolish to compete in the open market for the services of their best pitcher. Sox tickets and merchandise are hotter than they were at this time last summer and Pat Moscaritolo, president of a Boston tourist group, says, “For the past 10 years that I’ve been tracking visitor spending and the economic impact of the Red Sox, it’s almost unaffected by the team’s performance.’’

The Sox were positively surging with five wins in six games against terrible/mediocre teams (aggregate 21 games under .500) as they prepped for the Royals Saturday night. The KC-Boston matchup is a good one, since it sometimes sounds like the Sox want to be a middle-market team. Like the Royals of recent decades (29 years since making the playoffs), the Sox now sell the fans on “watching the kids.” Don’t people realize that EVERY team has a farm system stocked with young players who’d love to play in front of sellout crowds in the moribund final months of a season? It amazes me how soft this baseball market has become. In 1978 fans and media crushed the Sox for a 99-win season that concluded with eight consecutive pressure-packed victories. The Boston manager was unmercifully booed on Opening Day the following year. Now everything is awesome because the Boston ballpark is a tourist destination and fans fall in love with the hype of every young player coming through the system. Swell. When did we become St. Louis?

 

Ouch. The only thing Shaughnessy left out? That the principal owner of the GlobeSox etc. etc.

Regardless, how much fun is it that Henry employed his own crosstown rival to dope-slap his wayward minion, saying this:

 “Fans continue to sell out Fenway. They’ve suffered through some really bad games this year, but they continue to show up and the mood at the park among the fans is very positive when I walk through the stands. Before Tom [Werner], Larry [Lucchino] and I arrived I believe fans had less patience.

“A loud curmudgeon I know accuses them of being soft, bad fans — but anyone paying attention knows the mood has changed at Fenway over the years. People expect good things from the Sox and really love being at Fenway. This team accomplished something very special last year therefore the fans aren’t about to not give them the benefit of the doubt.”

 

Love that double negative. Wonder what Mr. Shaughnessy thinks.


Hark! The Herald! (Big Papi Edition)

October 16, 2013

From our Walt Whitman desk

Today’s Boston Herald has a swell time patting itself on the back for yet another mention by “Journalism’s own hall of fame” – that would be The Newseum – in its daily Top Ten Front Pages feature.

Under the headline “Sports Stories” there’s this:

When a sports story makes the front page, it usually gets the best play. Just look at today’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which devoted half of Page One to the Cardinals’ baseball playoff loss. Of course, newspapers aren’t always so keen to promote defeat. The Indianapolis Star found a way to downplay the Colts’ loss in “Monday Night Football” by focusing on the positive. Go team!

 

You don’t have to tell the feisty local tabloid twice.

 

Picture 2

 

And don’t miss that dig at crosstown rival Boston Globe:

The Herald was the only Boston paper featured in the Top 10 list yesterday. The Herald’s front page was even tweeted out by Red Sox owner John W. Henry.

 

You know he’s gonna own the Globe too, right?

It doesn’t get much better than that for the Heraldniks.


Local Dailies Have Mo Sports Coverage

July 22, 2013

The Boston Sunday papers feature – hold on now – very similar takes on New York Yankee immortal Mariano Rivera, who’s been on a unique farewell tour in this his final season.

Peter Abraham piece from the Boston Sunday Globe:

Yankees’ Mariano Rivera ending career in style

Retiring Yankees great Rivera meeting with special groups at every ballpark he visits

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Mariano Rivera played his first game at Fenway Park on July 16, 1996. He was a setup reliever then and pitched two innings against the Red Sox. Joe Girardi, who manages the Yankees now, was the catcher.

John Basmajian can’t remember for sure, but he probably was at the game that day. The guy everybody at Fenway calls “Baz” has been working at the park for 46 years selling tickets.

In the years since, surely their paths crossed. If you count the postseason, Rivera has walked into Fenway Park more than any ballpark other than Yankee Stadium. Baz? He’s as much a part of Fenway as the Pesky Pole.

On Saturday, the two career baseball men finally met.

“Pretty special,” Basmajian said. “I’ve got tears in my eyes.”

 

Rivera is doing something special in his final run through the American League. “[H]e is holding small, informal meetings with people at every park he visits . . . It can be fans, team employees, or some combination of the two.”

Here’s a taste of what the Boston meeting was like:

After a brief introduction from [Yankees media relations director Jason] Zillo, Rivera led a discussion that lasted 40 minutes. He spoke softly at first then a little louder as he encouraged others to join in.

Rivera called all of the participants by name, too. People he had never met before and might never see again were treated with the respect he would show a teammate.

“It’s an honor for me to be here with you guys.” Rivera said. “First of all to say thank you. Thank you for all of you who are a part of baseball. I wanted to do something different. I wanted to be able to hear from people that we don’t see on the field. We see the people in the clubhouse and we see the people who work on the field, but we don’t see everybody who works behind the scenes who make baseball what it is.”

 

Among the group Rivera addressed were Jimmy Fund patients Harry Clark, “a 13-year-old from Wellesley who is visually impaired by an inoperable brain tumor,” and Fernando Morales, “a 19-year-old from Norwood who had to give up his sport, soccer, because of Ewing’s sarcoma.”

Rivera’s tender interactions with the two speak volumes about the man.

Crosstown, Sunday’s Boston Herald front page featured this bromantic swoon:

 

Picture 1

 

Michael Silverman piece:

072013soxmh02Closer to reality

Mariano Rivera brings goodwill tour to Fenway meeting

For one day at least, Mariano Rivera made the whole Red Sox-Yankees rivalry look silly.

Rivera, the most respected player of his generation and the best closer in the history of his sport, spread his brand of love and kindness all over the Red Sox and Fenway Park yesterday . . .

His pregame visit took place in a Fenway suite where fans — young and old, some with cancer, victims of the Boston Marathon bombings — along with longtime Fenway employees sat in a semicircle around the 43-year-old Rivera, who was dressed in his Yankees batting-practice uniform.

His greeting was essentially his thanks to them for being there.

 

As the Globe piece noted, the Boston fans thanked him right back.

The fans at Fenway gave Rivera a standing ovation when he came out of the bullpen to pitch the ninth inning. He picked up the save as the Yankees won, 5-2.

“I appreciate this place,” Rivera said. “To me, there is no rivalry. We all love baseball.”

 

And, clearly, we all love The Great Rivera.


Dan Shaughnessy (Steno Edition)

January 21, 2013

The cover story in the Sunday Boston Globe Magazine features sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy’s promo for his new book  on former Red Sox manager Terry Francona.

Picture 1

 

Set the record straight?

Maybe not so much.

From Shaughnessy’s piece:

Our writing process was simple and structured. Terry and I would meet, usually in a hotel coffee shop or restaurant. I’d record a couple of hours of conversation, then disappear for a few weeks to write. When a chapter was finished, I’d e-mail it to Terry, and he’d call back with corrections, clarifications, and occasionally a deletion.

“Do we have to call Heathcliff Slocumb ‘useless’?” he’d say. “Let’s take that out.”

Gone.

“I know you don’t like Schill, but we’re not going to call him a blowhard in my book.”

Fine. Schill is not a blowhard. Not in this book, anyway.

 

And Shaughnessy was not a journalist. Not in this book, anyway.

Michael Silverman’s Baseball Notes column in the Sunday Boston Herald reinforced that point.

Terry FranconaTito:  Book no hatchet job

Terry Francona did not set out to hurt anybody’s feelings when he co-wrote a book about his eight years with the Red Sox.

If the owners are not happy with their portrayal — and how could they be? — as being more concerned with image than substance and as not loving baseball as much as Francona, the former Sox manager owns up to that.

He felt he was being honest, after all. When he was fired or quit in October 2011, his own feelings were hurt. So, without any malice or forethought on his part, it sounds kind of natural to Francona that not everyone is going to be chuckling about how they are portrayed in the book.

 

Actually, no one but the owners will have anything to complain about. That’s because, according to Silverman, “[a]ny potentially touchy stories about players were vetted, via one-on-ones with Shaughnessy, so that nobody is surprised.” And Francona adds, “I checked with everybody — I didn’t use anything that I thought would make people mad.”

Anyone besides the hardreading staff mad about that?