No Credit Where Credit’s Due from Boston Herald

April 1, 2016

From time to time the hardreading staff issues credit reports on the stories the Boston dailies appropriate from one another. For example, yesterday we noted that Boston Globe reporter Joshua Miller’s Political Happy Hour gave a credit and a link to Herald columnist Joe Battenfeld’s scoop on the latest dustup between Suffolk University trustees and President Margaret McKenna.

We’re dismayed to report, however, that the frosty local tabloid declined to return the favor today in Donna Goodison’s piece about the redevelopment of the Seaport District’s Pier 4.

Pier 4’s peerless design

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Tishman Speyer released new renderings for its Pier 4 project in the Seaport District that will include a nine-story, 100-unit luxury condo building and 13-story office building, both with ground-floor retail and restaurant space.

The New York company plans to demolish the former Anthony’s Pier 4 restaurant next week to make room for a one-acre park and half-acre public plaza as part of its development on the South Boston waterfront.

 

That piece comes in the wake of Tim Logan’s far superior one that appeared in Wednesday’s Globe.

 

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No mention of the Globe’s piece in today’s stingy local tabloid, though.

C’mon, Heraldniks: Be a mensch, eh?

P.S. Boston Magazine’s Kyle Scott Clauss also picked up on the story today, but – to his credit – he did give credit to the Globe.


Red Sox Presidential Pitches Are High and Wide

February 17, 2016

The Boston Red Sox are suddenly players in the 2016 presidential race, but at least two of them aren’t exactly on the same team.

Start with Kyle Clauss’s Boston Magazine piece yesterday.

Billionaire John Henry Wants Billionaire Mike Bloomberg to Run for President

The two-party system is broken, so why not an oligarchy?

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Red Sox principal owner John Henry celebrated Presidents Day by urging former three-term New York mayor Michael Bloomberg to make a run for the White House. Keeping in line with the first law of online media—”Tweets with pictures get more attention than those without”—the Boston Globe attached a photo of some avant garde carpeting, for good measure.

 

Here’s what Henry posted on his Twitter feed:

 

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Yeah – we have no idea what the graphic means either.

But that’s not the end of Billionaires Row for the Olde Towne Team. Here’s Nick Cafardo’s campaign coverage in today’s Boston Globe:

Buchholz has a ringing endorsement for Trump

Add matchmaker to Donald Trump’s list of successful endeavors.

Trump introduced model/actress Lindsay Clubine to Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz.Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 12.10.50 PM

“It was 2008 in Anaheim,” Buchholz recalled. “It was Sean Casey, myself, probably like eight or nine guys, and we went to a UFC fight after one game and then we went to the after party.

“It was ‘Affliction: Banned’ fighting, and [Trump] owned the whole circuit. My wife knew him prior, from ‘Deal or No Deal’ when he came on the show as a celebrity banker.

“She was helping him host this event in Anaheim. So when we all walked in, he was there, and he saw us and he introduced Lindsey to me.”

 

Isn’t that sweet?

Now if we can just get Big Papi to endorse Bernie Sanders, we’ll have a real ballgame.

Memo to Boston Herald owner Pat Purcell: Still time to play – have you considered drafting Mitt Romney?


Herald Leaves Globe in Grand Prix Dust

September 30, 2015

Man, that’s some serious road rage over at the Boston Herald.

Yesterday’s front page (with Inexplicable Little Green Number!):

 

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Today the revvy local tabloid is back at it.

Race critics cry foul on taxpayer funds saying . . .

IT’S ANOTHER RUNAROUND

Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.15.42 PMThe type of Grand Prix racing poised to roar through Boston’s streets next year has forced other host cities to inject taxpayer money to keep the motors running — in one case up to $4 million — spotlighting the challenges the Hub faces in avoiding a big public tab for the event, the Herald has found.

“These events do require capital, like any other type of sporting event or facility, and the onus is on the event promoter to be able to make the event work … from a promotional aspect, from an operational standpoint and also as a neighbor,” said Tim Frost, a Chicago-based motorsports business consultant.

“There is a really big economic event in there,” Frost said, and how they’ll avoid tapping public funds is “a very valid question.”

 

The Herald piece details some of the taxpayer liability in IndyCar cities San Jose, Baltimore, and St. Petersburg, Fla. The filmy local tabloid also provides this helpful video:

 

 

Crosstown, meanwhile, the Boston Globe is stuck in first gear, lamely running this piece on today’s C3.

Indy race riles condo owners

S. Boston group’s letter cites safety, noise issues

updatedmap

Residents of a condo complex on the South Boston Waterfront are challenging efforts to turn their street into part of Boston’s first IndyCar race.

In a 14-page letter sent to Mayor Martin J. Walsh on Tuesday, a lawyer representing the Seaport Lofts Condominium Association raised a number of legal issues with the race.

Among them: the allegation that the city improperly negotiated a contract with event organizer Grand Prix of Boston without going through the proper public review.

The condo residents’ goals include blocking the race, scheduled to take place during Labor Day weekend next year, or forcing it to be moved.

 

But nothing about the hosing taxpayers might get from the five-year event.

Both local dailies, however, are drafting on David Bernstein’s major takeout in Boston magazine three months ago.

Is the Grand Prix Taking Boston for a Ride?

Since Boston is already mired in a mud fight over whether or not the city can afford to host the 2024 Olympics, you might think Mayor Marty Walsh would be reluctant to take on any big, new, public sporting events. Not so. In mid-May, without public hearings, Walsh signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Grand Prix of Boston, clearing the way for the city to host five annual IndyCar road races on the South Boston waterfront, each Labor Day weekend from 2016 to 2020. Speaking by phone on Tuesday, Walsh compared the Grand Prix to the Tall Ships display, which returns to Boston in 2017. “The economic opportunity is something that made me interested in it,” he says.

It’s an interesting comparison, given Boston’s wild, sometimes comical, occasionally acrimonious disagreements about the economic value of the Tall Ships over the past 25 years. Those events either brought close to $1 billion to greater Boston, or were a net loss, or anywhere in between, depending on whom you ask.

 

Bernstein proceeds to chronicle, in eye-popping detail, the financial burdens the Grand Prix has imposed on other IndyCar cities. If it’s not the definitive piece on this topic, it’ll do until something better comes along.

Take a victory lap, David.


Boston 2024: The Grift That Keeps on Giving

June 11, 2015

As you splendid readers well know, the Boston news media – from the Boston Business Journal to WGBH to Boston Magazine to WBUR to the Boston Globe – are on Store 2024 like Brown on Williamson.

But not the Boston Herald.

Sure, the feisty local tabloid has provided some basic coverage of the five-ring monte Olympic bid, but it’s not breaking news the way other local outlets have. The Herald these days is more about Deval Patrick’s financial shenanigans.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Exhibit A: Yesterday’s Joe Battenfeld column.

Patrick Secretly Diverted Junket Cash

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Former Gov. Deval Patrick’s administration secretly diverted nearly $27 million in public money to off-budget accounts that paid for a $1.35 million trade junket tab, bloated advertising contracts, and a deal with a federally subsidized tourism venture backed by U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, a Herald investigation has found.

The maneuver to fatten the hidden “trust” 

accounts with millions from state quasi-public agencies allowed Patrick to skirt the state Legislature and evade state budget cutbacks during the recession, the Herald found.

 

Elsewhere in the piece, the number seems to be over $37 million. Helpful chart:

 

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Whatever.

Exhibit B: Today’s Herald page 5 (with bonus Inexplicable Green 1).

 

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See? Even the paper’s Olympic coverage is part of its Devalue Pak.

Meanwhile, the latest Boston NOlympics revelations include this in the BBJ, which suggests that those expecting the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority to “save the Boston Olympics” Must Be Taking Acid. The Boston Globe contributes this front-page piece about Boston 2024 relocating the Widett Circle food wholesalers to the Seaport (one really smart person we know thinks the entire Boston 2024 effort is just a land grab to develop the New Boston Food Market site). The Globe also features this Metro piece about the full-court press on the Boston 2024 organizers to finally get down to specifics.

WBUR also has a couple of new reports today about bigger Olympic footprints, and WGBH tosses in this piece about new venues and public relations.

But the Boston Herald? Call it the shelfie local tabloid.


Fifty Million Bucks Seems to Be the Going Rate for University Naming Rights

March 31, 2015

Chasing big money donors is a three-part process: first the begging, then the bagging, then the bragging.

That last is what two institutions of higher education are doing via full-page ads in today’s Boston Globe.

Let’s take them in numerical order. From page 7:

 

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A closer look at the copy:

 

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The hardreading staff isn’t quite sure why the ad ran in the Globe, and this USC puff piece doesn’t provide much of an answer, except that Mark Stevens got an MBA at Harvard. That’s probably enough, eh?

The connection to Boston is obvious in the ad two pages later.

 

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Close-up:

 

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Here’s a BU puff piece.

Eric Randall has a smart piece on Boston Magazine’s website about the $50 million Questrom. He writes, “Back in 2006, Bloomberg Businessweek sounded prophetic in reporting on the business school naming rights trend.”

And it doesn’t have to be just business schools. We’re about to put the Global Worldwide Headquarters up for grabs. Bidding starts at $50. Don’t delay!


Boston Herald a Day Late, Dolor Short

March 5, 2015

From today’s Boston Globe Names column:

 

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Nothing on this sad story in the Boston Herald, but Boston magazine did have this yesterday:

Boston Marathon Survivors and Newlyweds Announce Split

Rebekah Gregory and Pete DiMartino were married for 10 months.

Pete DiMartino, Rebekah Gregory

Almost a year after walking down the aisle, Rebekah Gregory and Pete DiMartino, Boston Marathon bombing survivors whose romance unfolded in the public eye, have decided to separate.

Gregory and DiMartino’s uplifting story made national headlines last February when TheKnot.com sponsored their dream wedding. They’ve been together since November 2012, and appeared on Ellen last February.

 

No credit to BoMag in the Globe piece. But that’s par for the course. We’ll see what the Herald does when it finally catches up.


Hark! The Herald! (Whole in Their Head Edition)

January 12, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid seems determined to run a Whole Foods/Herald story as often as possible.

It started with this piece last Wednesday.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

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In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

(Boston Magazine’s Eric Randall immediately had a smart piece chronicling the Herald’s “screeds against the half of the country that columnist Howie Carr sometimes collectively refers to as ‘Whole Foods nation'” along with a roll call of the Herald’s Whole lotta love.)

Then Saturday’s Herald featured this update from Donna Goodison:

It’s a Whole new story at 
old Herald site

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Whole Foods Market debuted its newest Boston store in the South End Friday — its second largest in the region and considered a flagship for its North Atlantic division — and co-CEO Walter Robb sees room in the Hub for another of its size.

“We’ve seen the city evolving, so we have lots of plans,” the Boston native said. “The opportunity to come in here and get 50,000 square feet — that’s hard to do these days, and I do think there’s another one (in the future pipeline).” . . .

Its South End supermarket is in National Development’s $200 million Ink Block project, the former Boston Herald headquarters site for more than half a century, and it memorializes the newspaper’s history throughout its decor.

 

Of course it does.

Then yesterday, there was this thoroughly readable piece from Peter Gelzinis:

From press to produce

The legendary author Thomas Wolfe was misinformed when he wrote “You Can’t Go Home Again.”117A1228.JPG

I’m here to say you can. But when you do, you’ll discover home has been transformed into the biggest Whole Foods store in Boston.

 

It’s a sweet trip down Memory Lane with Bert McNeil and Mike Bello, Danny and Dennis Messing, and especially Gelzinis himself.

But there’s also a subtext to all that Wholesomeness: “Herald publisher Patrick J. Purcell [is] a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.”

So – a Whole lotta money involved.

And today?

Wholly absent.

But we don’t expect that to last long.


Hark! The Herald! (Gingerbread House Edition)

December 3, 2014

From our Walt Whitman desk

Question: When is a Gingerbread House Decorating Competition more than just flinging some frosting around?

Answer: When a Boston Herald scribe is one of the judges!

First, here’s how the Boston Globe’s Namesniks name-dropped the story:

Local celebs support Home for Little Wanderers

Home_GingerBread-5

There was some fierce competition at The Home for Little Wanderers’ annual Gingerbread House Decorating Competition, held Tuesday at Showcase Cinema de Lux at Legacy Place in Dedham. Among those constructing homes worthy of Hansel and Gretel were former TV anchor Bianca de la Garza, “American Hustle” actresses Erica McDermott and Melissa McMeekin, actress-producer Christy Scott Cashman, Magic 106.7’s Candy O’Terry, Summer Shack’s Jasper White, and baseball scribe Peter Gammons. The event raised $30,000 for The Home for Little Wanderers, which is one of New England’s largest child welfare agencies.

 

That’s okay, but the frosting local tabloid gave a clinic on how to hit the sweet spot.

For starters, give it the top of Page One.

 

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Then give it all of page 16.

 

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Holiday nut graf:

I was lucky enough to judge the competition with Joan Wallace-Benjamin, the president of the Home, our very own Kerry Byrne, Celtics mascot Lucky, Boston Magazine’s Leah Mennies and Magic 106.7’s Chris Shine.

 

And that, my friends, is how it’s done.


Boston Herald Thinks NAACP = Not Accepting Any Critical Provisions

October 6, 2014

Call it the Watermelon Summit.

The editorial cartoon rumpus at the Boston Herald has arrived at its inevitable destination: A sitdown between Herald editors and the local chapter of the NAACP.

From Sunday’s edition of the flavory local tabloid.

Herald vows to work with Boston NAACP

Curry: Obama cartoon ‘perpetuates stereotype’

The Boston Herald will work with the Boston chapter of the NAACP to address the issues raised by the publication of an editorial page cartoon last week.

The cartoon, focusing on security breaches at the White House, depicted President Obama brushing his teeth as an intruder suggested he try watermelon-flavored toothpaste. Cartoonist Jerry Holbert said he intended no racial overtones and apologized as did the newspaper.

The NAACP yesterday called the Herald apologies “inadequate” and said the publication of the cartoon on the paper’s opinion page “reopened the wounds of race” in Boston. It requested a series of remedies including a community meeting to discuss the editorial page cartoon.

 

That would be Boston NAACP president Michael Curry in the subhead, who got this response from a Herald statement:

​”The Herald has made it clear that this editorial page cartoon was unacceptable in its insensitivity and racial overtones . . .  We look forward to continuing our partnership with the NAACP and meeting with them to address the concerns that arose as a result.”

 

But crosstown at the Boston Globe, the Herald seemed to have a very different message for the NAACP.

Curry said that Herald executives told him they were ready to hear from the black community but had not yet committed to pursuing any action beyond a meeting.

“They said to me that they’re willing to do whatever and they’re expecting to hear from the community at this forum,” he said. “I think what’s important here is they’ve said no to nothing at this point.”

 

Then again, they’ve also said yes to nothing, yes?

Yes.


Whoopi Goldberg Defends Herald Watermelon Man

October 3, 2014

From our Late to the Rescue Party desk

So, to recap:

On Wednesday Boston Herald editorial cartoonist Jerry Holbert sparked a watermelon-flavored rumpus with this ill-advised (and ill-supervised) drawing in the clueless local tabloid.

 

 

holberts-10-01-cartoon

 

Much mishegoss ensued.

(The redoubtable Dan Kennedy has a smart recap of the fiasco here.)

And then . . .

Whoopi.

Via Mediabistro’s FishbowlDC:

Whoopi Goldberg Defends Boston Herald Cartoonist on ‘The View’

In response to a controversial cartoon that appeared in yesterday’s Boston Herald, ”The View” co-host Whoopi Goldberg defended the cartoonist on today’s show.

Following information that the Sept. 19 White House fence-jumper made it to the East Room of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue rather than just past the North Portico doors as earlier reported, Jerry Holbert‘s cartoon contribution in yesterday’s print edition portrayed President Barack Obama brushing his teeth with a man behind him asking, “Have you tried the watermelon toothpaste?” and the caption “White House Invader Got Farther Than Previously Thought.”

[Thursday] morning, Goldberg addressed the controversy on “The View,” saying “I don’t believe he did it on purpose. I don’t think he was thinking about it.”

 

Here’s the clip:

 

 

Just for the record: Rosie Perez was having none of it.

Regardless, this is likely the end of it:

 

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Of course, taste was never the Herald’s strong suit, was it?