Fifty Million Bucks Seems to Be the Going Rate for University Naming Rights

March 31, 2015

Chasing big money donors is a three-part process: first the begging, then the bagging, then the bragging.

That last is what two institutions of higher education are doing via full-page ads in today’s Boston Globe.

Let’s take them in numerical order. From page 7:

 

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A closer look at the copy:

 

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The hardreading staff isn’t quite sure why the ad ran in the Globe, and this USC puff piece doesn’t provide much of an answer, except that Mark Stevens got an MBA at Harvard. That’s probably enough, eh?

The connection to Boston is obvious in the ad two pages later.

 

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Close-up:

 

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Here’s a BU puff piece.

Eric Randall has a smart piece on Boston Magazine’s website about the $50 million Questrom. He writes, “Back in 2006, Bloomberg Businessweek sounded prophetic in reporting on the business school naming rights trend.”

And it doesn’t have to be just business schools. We’re about to put the Global Worldwide Headquarters up for grabs. Bidding starts at $50. Don’t delay!

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Hark! The Herald! (Whole in Their Head Edition)

January 12, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid seems determined to run a Whole Foods/Herald story as often as possible.

It started with this piece last Wednesday.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

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In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

(Boston Magazine’s Eric Randall immediately had a smart piece chronicling the Herald’s “screeds against the half of the country that columnist Howie Carr sometimes collectively refers to as ‘Whole Foods nation'” along with a roll call of the Herald’s Whole lotta love.)

Then Saturday’s Herald featured this update from Donna Goodison:

It’s a Whole new story at 
old Herald site

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Whole Foods Market debuted its newest Boston store in the South End Friday — its second largest in the region and considered a flagship for its North Atlantic division — and co-CEO Walter Robb sees room in the Hub for another of its size.

“We’ve seen the city evolving, so we have lots of plans,” the Boston native said. “The opportunity to come in here and get 50,000 square feet — that’s hard to do these days, and I do think there’s another one (in the future pipeline).” . . .

Its South End supermarket is in National Development’s $200 million Ink Block project, the former Boston Herald headquarters site for more than half a century, and it memorializes the newspaper’s history throughout its decor.

 

Of course it does.

Then yesterday, there was this thoroughly readable piece from Peter Gelzinis:

From press to produce

The legendary author Thomas Wolfe was misinformed when he wrote “You Can’t Go Home Again.”117A1228.JPG

I’m here to say you can. But when you do, you’ll discover home has been transformed into the biggest Whole Foods store in Boston.

 

It’s a sweet trip down Memory Lane with Bert McNeil and Mike Bello, Danny and Dennis Messing, and especially Gelzinis himself.

But there’s also a subtext to all that Wholesomeness: “Herald publisher Patrick J. Purcell [is] a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.”

So – a Whole lotta money involved.

And today?

Wholly absent.

But we don’t expect that to last long.


Herald Tells Half the Story on Remy WEEI Interview

March 29, 2014

Today’s Boston Herald features this story about an interview Jerry Remy gave to WEEI’s John Dennis and Gerry Callahan yesterday.

‘Mixed feelings’ for Martel’s father after Remy interview

Jennifer Martel’s father said he has “mixed feelings” about Red Sox icon Jerry Remy’s lengthy and defensive radio interview yesterday, in which the NESN color man admitted he and his wife enabled their alleged killer son but denied coaxing Martel into dropping a China Olympics Beijing Water Cube Bird's Nestrestraining order shortly before her murder . . .

In the interview — Remy’s first extensive comments about his son — the second-baseman turned broadcaster and restaurateur said he never got Jared Remy his Red Sox security job, didn’t know the bodybuilder was using his allowance on steroids, and defended his record as a grandfather to the couple’s 5-year-old daughter, Arianna. A custody settlement reached this week awards the Remys visitation while giving guardianship to Martel’s parents.

 

But the foggy local tabloid left out how Remy “defended his record as a grandparent”  – by attacking Herald columnist Margery Eagan for this piece questioning the wisdom of giving Jerry and wife Phoebe Remy shared custody of their granddaughter Arianna, whose mother, Jennifer Martel, Jared Remy allegedly murdered.

From Eric Randall’s Boston Magazine blog post yesterday:

Jerry Remy Does Not Like To Be Called a Bad Grandparent

Remy shot back at a Herald column that wondered whether he’s fit to see his granddaughter.

NESN Red Sox commentator Jerry Remy gave a fascinating interview to the Dennis & Callahan radio show that shed light on which criticisms gets most under his skin in the wake of his son Jared’s alleged murder.Jerry Remy

Remy won’t be stepping down from his position at NESN, but he acknowledged the calls for him to quit, the accusations that he failed as a parent, and the recent Globe investigation into his son Jared Remy’s criminal history. He only sounded an angry note when seemingly alluding to a Margary Eagan column in the Herald suggesting the Remys shouldn’t have partial custody of their granddaughter.

 

The angry note:

You know I read a column yesterday that comes out and says we’re bad parents and we shouldn’t even be allowed to see our granddaughter because what will we do, have pictures of our son all over the house? I mean we’re not stupid … It’s that kind of reporting that is disgusting to me because what are we going to do, bring our granddaughter into the house, show her pictures of daddy? Give me a break. Have her on the phone with him from the can? Give me a break. Take visitations to jail? Give me a break. I mean, we’re not stupid either. So it’s those kind of things that upset me a bit.

 

Apparently it upset the Herald too, since they left that part out.

 

China Olympics Beijing Water Cube Bird's Nest


Celtics ADknowledge Boston Herald’s Existence

July 12, 2013

The hardreading staff has noted two instances lately of tribute ads that ran in the Boston Globe but not in the Boston Herald. And so it was with no little interest that we saw this in today’s stately local broadsheet:

 

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Which sent us scurrying to the Herald to see if it had suffered its accustomed fate.

It had not.

The Celtics gave the feisty local tabloid equal time (and ad space).

 

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But lest the folks at the Herald start feeling they’re on equal footing with the Globe, witness this from Eric Randall at the Boston Daily blog:

The Celtics took out a full-page ad in Friday’s Boston Globe to thank departing stars Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce for “bleeding green” all those years. It’s a nice move that you don’t see teams pull out for just any departing players.

But then, nor is it any surprise that Pierce and Garnett would merit special attention . . .

 

Moral of the story: Someone’s always ignoring the Herald somewhere.


Herald to Globe: Wrong, Baby, Wrong

October 10, 2012

It started out small, the second of two seemingly mundane corrections:

That’s what appeared in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

Here’s what appeared in today’s Boston Herald, compliments of the Track Gals (and Megan!):

Globe won’t ‘Live’ down this blunder

Bestselling Boston writer Dennis Lehane blasted the Globe yesterday, saying the Boring Broadsheet called him racist in a Sunday book review. Trouble is, the “Magical Negro” character that the Globe reviewer claimed Lehane created in his new book is white!

“Accusing a writer of engaging in racial stereotypes is accusing a writer of racism,” Lehane told the Track. “That’s not something you should do casually or without your doing your homework. To call me out for creating a racist stereotype of an African-American character when that character is, in fact, Caucasian is offensive on a multitude of levels.”

The reviewer, Eugenia Williamson, wrote this according to the Globe’s website:

The novel’s flaws converge during a stunningly embarrassing scene in which Joe meets a character named Turner John, a wise yet humble bootlegger and self-described “champeen in the snoring.” Although Joe’s been sent to put a hit on him, instead Turner John tugs at his heart strings with a soliloquy written in dialect: “I had me a fine daddy. Only beat me hard when I had it coming and never when he’d taken to drink,” he says. “You want my money, Mr. Coughlin? Well then you best set to working with me and my boys on the mash and helping us work our farm, till the soil, rotate the crops, milk the cows. You follow?” Does Joe kill Turner John or make his father proud? You decide.

Except that’s not all she wrote. The Globe has removed her references to Turner John as “what Spike Lee would call a magical Negro” and an “African-American bootlegger.”

Except he’s not.

Lehane’s pretty lathered up about this, calling the correction a “pseudo retraction” and  telling the Track “For (Globe editor) Marty Baron, (book editor) Nicole Lamy or the reviewer to then not have the simple decency to contact me and say, ‘Sorry we implied you were a racist, Dennis,’ shows a serious lack of class on their part.”

Eric Randall at Boston magazine’s Boston Daily blog has a smart follow-up:

Dennis Lehane got so angry at a Globe review of his new book Live By Night that accused him of creating a stereotypical “Magical Negro” character, that he learned to use Facebook so he could turn the tables and call the review racist. And not because he says his character isn’t an African American stereotype but because he says his character isn’t an African-American at all. Well played, Lehane.

Randall also includes a link to Lehane’s Facebook page.

Go, baby, go.