Boston Herald Pitches Purcell Property

February 21, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

Call him Pat Pursell.

Boston Herald publisher Pat Purcell is a minority investor in National Development’s $200 million Ink Block project on the South End site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

As the hardreading staff has noted, the selfie local tabloid relentlessly heralded last month’s opening of a new Whole Foods market on the site, which will also include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants. One of those pieces disclosed Purcell’s financial stake in the development, but we’re not sure the others did (we tried to check, but they’re archived at $3.95 a pop).

Regardless, now comes yesterday’s full-page pitch (in article form) for the next Ink Block phase – two apartment complexes.

 

Screen Shot 2015-02-21 at 1.36.23 AM

 

Pitch-perfect graf:

Rents in the three buildings range from $2,529 to $2,804 for studios, $3,234 to $4,304 for one bedrooms, $4,104 to $4,704 for two bedrooms and $5,404-$5,804 for three bedrooms. Garage parking costs $325 a month.

 

Disclosure of Purcell’s financial interest in the project is conveniently buried in the middle of the piece.

Perfect.

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Hark! The Herald! (Whole in Their Head Edition)

January 12, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid seems determined to run a Whole Foods/Herald story as often as possible.

It started with this piece last Wednesday.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

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In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

(Boston Magazine’s Eric Randall immediately had a smart piece chronicling the Herald’s “screeds against the half of the country that columnist Howie Carr sometimes collectively refers to as ‘Whole Foods nation'” along with a roll call of the Herald’s Whole lotta love.)

Then Saturday’s Herald featured this update from Donna Goodison:

It’s a Whole new story at 
old Herald site

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Whole Foods Market debuted its newest Boston store in the South End Friday — its second largest in the region and considered a flagship for its North Atlantic division — and co-CEO Walter Robb sees room in the Hub for another of its size.

“We’ve seen the city evolving, so we have lots of plans,” the Boston native said. “The opportunity to come in here and get 50,000 square feet — that’s hard to do these days, and I do think there’s another one (in the future pipeline).” . . .

Its South End supermarket is in National Development’s $200 million Ink Block project, the former Boston Herald headquarters site for more than half a century, and it memorializes the newspaper’s history throughout its decor.

 

Of course it does.

Then yesterday, there was this thoroughly readable piece from Peter Gelzinis:

From press to produce

The legendary author Thomas Wolfe was misinformed when he wrote “You Can’t Go Home Again.”117A1228.JPG

I’m here to say you can. But when you do, you’ll discover home has been transformed into the biggest Whole Foods store in Boston.

 

It’s a sweet trip down Memory Lane with Bert McNeil and Mike Bello, Danny and Dennis Messing, and especially Gelzinis himself.

But there’s also a subtext to all that Wholesomeness: “Herald publisher Patrick J. Purcell [is] a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.”

So – a Whole lotta money involved.

And today?

Wholly absent.

But we don’t expect that to last long.


Hark! The Herald! (Whole Foods Edition)

January 7, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The selfie local tabloid has a good one in today’s edition.

Whole Foods design honors Herald legacy

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In the South End landmark where ink once flowed and the Boston Herald’s presses roared, shoppers will now enjoy frangipane tarts, cooked-to-order ramen and a milk + honey spa at Boston’s newest and most innovative Whole Foods.

The 50,000-square-foot gourmet supermarket is part of National Development’s Ink Block project on the site that was home to the Herald for 53 years.

 

Whole Foods spokeswoman Heather McCready told the Herald’s Donna Goodison, “We really held on to a lot of the Herald. We were happy to take it, frame it and keep it as a time capsule for our store.”

Sweet.

And a sweet deal for Herald publisher Pat Purcell, “a minority investor in the $200 million Ink Block project, which also will include luxury condos and apartments, retail shops and restaurants.” Not to mention (and the Herald piece doesn’t) that the land itself belonged – belongs? – to Purcell.

That’s a lot of frangipane tarts, yeah?

 


Hark! The Herald . . . Ignores Itself! (Wingo Square Edition)

April 8, 2013

Some of the Boston Herald staffers got together yesterday at the feisty local tabloid’s former South End headquarters to kiss the old dump goodbye. It’s slated for the wrecking ball this week, so about 30 current and former staffers gathered and reminisced at what was once known as Wingo Square, named after the incessant numbers games the Herald ran back in the ’80s to goose circulation.

Surprisingly, today’s Herald has no story about the reunion. But crosstown rival Boston Globe does.

07heraldphotos03Boston Herald veterans salute building’s passing

The old Boston Herald headquarters in the South End will stand for just a few more days, but memories of the colorful characters and feisty spirit that filled the squat brick building on Harrison Avenue for five decades will have a much longer shelf life.

That was the message from about 30 former Herald staffers who met across the street from the building on Sunday afternoon to reminisce before demolition begins on Friday to make way for an apartment and retail development called the Ink Block .

“The esprit de corps here was extraordinary,” said David Weber, a Herald reporter for 17 years who left in 2005. “We were a powerful underdog. That’s the way we felt.”

 

That seems to be the way Heraldniks still feel, except in a nicer building.

Regardless, the Globe reports that “[a] formal farewell is planned for Thursday, when speakers, including Herald columnist Joe Fitzgerald, will pay tribute to the site.” Hard to believe the Herald won’t cover that one.

Tip o’ the pixel to Dan Kennedy’s Facebook post.