Boston Globe Ad: Seth Moulton Dodging Debates

October 31, 2018

Rising Democratic star Seth Moulton has been criss-crossing the country endorsing veterans for House seats, while double-crossing his Massachusetts constituents by refusing to debate his Sixth District challenger.

At least that’s the premise of Joe Schneider’s full-page ad in yesterday’s Boston Globe.

 

 

Drive-Moulton-nuts graf

 

That’s a legit question.

Four years ago Moulton called out incumbent John Tierney for refusing to debate him in the 2014 Democratic primary.

Now he’s the incumbent ducking debates.

Let’s see if Moulton has a legit answer before November 6th.

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Boston Herald for Sale, Price Is Right for Globe

October 28, 2018

When the costly local tabloid arrived at the Global Worldwide Headquarters this morning, the front page of Sunday Sports blared out this:

STAY ON SCHEDULE

Silverman: Red Sox stick to plan,

save Sale for Game 5

 

Said Michael Silverman piece ran on page 3.

 

 

Except . . . this Peter Abraham piece is more like it.

 

 

(To be sure graf goes here)

To be sure, the Herald got it all sorted out eventually, as the paper’s website and E-Edition indicate. But that sure doesn’t help the lowly home subscriber, now does it?


Herald’s Boston/LA Byline Bakeoff a Big Baseball Bust

October 25, 2018

Taking a cue from the Boston Globe’s Home/Away feature that matches up Globe columnist Christopher Gasper with a columnist from the hometown paper of that week’s Patriots opponent, the Boston Herald ran this on page 2 of Tuesday’s edition.

Good idea, if derivative. Tuesday’s columns were a compare ‘n’ contrast of the respective ballyards of the World’s Serious rivals, with Fenway holding the obvious edge.

But then yesterday Alexander wrote about the Bruins-Kings NHL rivalry, and Pelletier nattered on about Bobby Orr vs. Wayne Gretzky, which seemed more than odd to the headscratching staff.

And today?

 

 

 

Seriously? That’s just idiotic.

Of course, the columnists can’t write about what they should be – namely, last night’s baseball game – because the flimsy local tabloid is printed in East Jesus, Rhode Island around dinnertime the night before.

We’ll say it again.

Boston Herald Subscription: Biggest. Waste.Ever.


Boston TV Dress Coda: Ties Clipped at NECN/NBC10

October 22, 2018

Well the hardreading staff was perusing the Sunday papers yesterday when we came across a startling sartorial item in the Boston Globe’s Names column, which actually recycled the story so we’ll reference Kevin Slane’s original piece on Boston.com.

A local TV station just got a new dress code

If you’ve been watching NECN recently, you may have noticed something missing. Male anchors in the studio have done away with the tie, a longtime staple of business attire.

The new dress code, implemented by NECN news director Ben Dobson, officially went into effect last week. Other NBC-owned stations in the region, including NBC10 Boston and Telemundo, plan to adopt the tie-less look, too.

 

Loosen the knot graf:

“Dobson said the move to ditch the neckwear is an effort to mirror its viewers, whom he believes are less likely to wear ties on a daily basis thanks to evolving workplace dress codes.”

Seriously? So maybe doctors should wear jeans and Patriots jerseys? Or lawyers could wear Lululemon to court? What the hell.

Back in the 1920s and ’30s, the BBC made radio announcers wear dinner jackets. In the U.S. at that time, announcers and performers wore tuxedos and gowns. It was a sign of respect for the listeners, even though they couldn’t see the broadcasters.

But that’s so old school. It’s clearly better to be personable than professional now, according to Audrey Mansfield, visual stylist for NBC-owned stations. She told Slane, “On set, they’ll still be wearing a nice shirt and full suit. They’ll still have a very nice collar, and be very well-groomed. It is one piece of clothing we are taking away.”

Except it’s more than just a necktie. At least to some of us old fogies.


Boston Herald Advertises Result of Its Brutal Layoffs

October 7, 2018

Our kissin’ cousins at One-Daily Town noted this the other day, but it bears repeating in this space: Since Digital Fist – sorry, First – Media bought the shaky local tabloid, the paper has gone from 225 employees to roughly 100, with the newsroom barely able to field a softball team.

And the lost jobs are not being outsourced as much as insourced – moved to other parts of the Digital First conglomerate.

So, for instance, the Herald’s copy editing is now done in Denver, as the Boston Globe’s Jon Chesto noted on Friday.

Much of the copy editing work heads to DFM employees in Denver, and ad sales increasingly will be handled out of Lowell, where DFM owns the Lowell Sun.

 

Some of the ad sales, however, are migrating to another DFM division – Denver-based Adtaxi – as this house ad indicates.

 

 

Adtaxi is a clearinghouse for ad placement and describes itself with gobbledygook like this:

“Taking an omnichannel approach, Adtaxi offers a true full-funnel solution powered by our intelligent optimization technology, Quantum, that drives performance to the conversion metrics that matter most to your business.”

 

As the sadreading staff at One-Daily Town said, “A Herald sales rep wouldn’t be caught dead talking like that. But a dead paper walking? Sure.”

Two postscripts:

1) From our Irony Deficient Herald desk

Yesterday’s shrinky local tabloid not only ran the Adtaxi ad, but also featured this AP story: “Jobless rate lowest since ’69.”

Except at the Herald, of course.

2) Also from our Irony Deficient Herald desk

The sketchy local tabloid has been running this small house ad almost every day for the past few weeks.

 

 

Except at the Herald, of course.


Columbia Gas: No One in Lawrence Reads the Herald

October 4, 2018

Columbia Gas, which oversaw the destruction of roughly 80 homes; the death of Leonel Rondon, a student at Phoenix Charter Academy; over two dozen injuries; and the disruption of thousands of other lives, promises to restore service to Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover by November 19th.

But . . .

The company is also hedging its bets, as yesterday’s full-page Boston Globe ad from Columbia Gasbag Joe Hamrock indicates.

 

 

Nuts to deadlines graf.

 

 

Notice first that Columbia Gas is outsourcing part of its responsibility for the recovery to “local, state and federal officials and other dedicated people and organizations.”

Also notice that there’s no mention of the November 19th deadline.

Also also notice that the ad did not run in the Boston Herald, yet another example of Boston institutions overlooking the thirsty local tabloid.

No wonder we’re destined to be a One-Daily Town.

P.S. It’s entirely coincidental that this is the front page of today’s Herald

 

 

and this is Metro Page One of the Globe.

 

 

 

Entirely.


Hark! The Herald! (Trusted? Better Verify Edition)

September 28, 2018

Latest in our endless series from the selfie local tabloid

As the hardreading staff was leafing through our New! Costlier! Boston Herald this morning, we came across this small house ad on page 9.

 

 

Who knew, right?

(To be sure graf goes here.)

To be sure, we have, on occasion, been wary of trusting the pluggy local tabloid regarding such matters, so we decided to check out that Brand Keys outfit, and here’s what we found.

A recent Brand Keys study measured “trust” among readers of their newspapers-of-choice.

Sure, ideology self-defines selection when it comes to subscribing to a newspaper (in print or digital), but “Trust” accounts for 41% of actual newspaper brand engagement.

The remaining 59% is accounted for by content and values addressing “entertainment listings and sports,” “an ability to educate and inform via news reporting, columnists, and editorial,” and providing insights into the “economy and local events and markets.”

 

The study asked 3800 readers – either print subscribers or regular digital readers (3+ times a week) – to evaluate their newspapers.

Drumroll, please.

 

 

Given its perhaps unlikely presence on the list, you can understand the chants of “We’re Number Twelve!” echoing around Fargo Street.

But when you think about it, 18% of regular Herald readers don’t trust the paper; of course, that’s also true of 14% of Boston Globe readers.

Maybe they should crisscross.