The Fur Flies in Opposite Directions at Boston Dailies

May 17, 2021

The professional provocateurs at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals took out a full-page ad in yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe accusing researchers at UMass-Amherst of animal abuse.

 

 

According to PETA’s website, Taxpayer-Funded Lab Torments Imprisoned Monkeys, Drives Them Mad.

The University of Massachusetts–Amherst (UMass) tried to keep you from seeing this video. PETA sued, and we won. But before we even got the footage, the experimenter retired!

Now you can see what the school was trying to hide: Experimenters at four National Primate Research CentersOregon National Primate Research Center, Southwest National Primate Research Center, Washington National Primate Research Center, and the now-shuttered New England National Primate Research Center—were paid for two decades to study how being caged in laboratories affects monkeys. Our government dumped tens of millions of dollars into these atrocities—and has never even acted on what it learned.

This dustup has been going on for like forever.

Crosstown at the Boston Herald (not really – neither local daily actually resides in Boston right now), the fur was more filing than flying in this half-page ad.

 

 

Not to be mean but, c’mon – how many of the 22,000 surviving daily Herald readers do you think actually own fur coats? Then again, that package deal looks pretty good, no?


Stop & Shop Ad Feeds the Public a Bunch of Baloney

April 23, 2019

During the 10-day strike by roughly 31,000 Stop & Shop workers the past couple of weeks, the supermarket chain ran a series of ads like this one in the Boston dailies.

 

Last Friday the five locals of the United Food and Commercial Workers responded with this clearly superior ad in the Boston Globe.

 

 

The UFCW won not only the ad battle, but the contract skirmish as well, as Globe reporter Katie Johnston details on Page One of today’s edition.

If members of the five union locals approve — voting starts later this week — new part-time workers would get lower pension contributions and would not be guaranteed time-and-a-half pay on Sundays and holidays during their first three years, as other workers are, according to the union. In a workforce largely made up of part-timers, this is not an insignificant change.

But the union succeeded in beating back a raft of other proposals. And if the contract is approved, current workers would get raises and the company would boost pension contributions for full-timers and maintain its current contributions for part-timers. That prompted the president of one of the five union locals to declare a “major victory.”

 

UMass Amherst labor studies professor Tom Juravich agreed, noting that 75% of loyal shoppers stayed away during the strike and the company lost $2 million a day. “That kind of leverage is unprecedented since the golden years of auto and steel,” he told Johnston.

So it was, well, interesting to see this ad also run in today’s Globe.

 

Sorry, fellas. Your customers were neither patient nor understanding. And they definitely did not stick with you.

You got your ads kicked.