No Drag: It’s Stoned Driving Day in the Boston Rags!

August 9, 2018

It will come as no surprise to alert readers of the local dailies that the two could attend the same event – yesterday’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over – and emerge with radically different angles on the drugged driving initiative. For the Boston Globe, the story is prevention; for the Boston Herald, it’s enforcement. Who woulda thunk?

Start with the State Street Sobriety Squad, for whom Dan Adams filed this report.

Mass. rolls out new ad warning of danger of driving stoned

 

With the debut of recreational marijuana sales imminent, Massachusetts safety officials on Wednesday unveiled a new television ad warning consumers against driving under the drug’s influence.

The 30-second spot, dubbed “The Roads You Take,” is meant to discourage driving while stoned, drunk, or impaired by other drugs.

It features a diverse group of people walking toward the camera and solemnly intoning fragmentary phrases: “There are roads — the ones you take, the ones you don’t. There are laws. There are rules. And there’s you — you driving; you drunk driving; you driving high; you stoned and driving; you spinning, crashing; you arrested; you killing,” before concluding, “there are roads, and then there are just dead ends.”

 

Here’s the TV spot in the $280,000 ad buy.

 

 

Meanwhile, crosstown on Fargo Street Mary Markos filed this (police) report.

STATIES SWAB VS. STONERS

Authorities seek Breathalyzer equivalent for pot

State police — expecting a surge in drugged driving now that pot is legal, and looking for a way to prove a driver is high — are finalizing a test of swabs they administered on about 170 people at roadside sobriety checks and a drug treatment center.

The Massachusetts State Police assessment is part of a nationwide effort by police to deal with the lack of chemical tests for drug intoxication comparable to Breathalyzers that are used to measure drunkenness. Legal experts say any chemical test is likely to face challenges in court.

 

They’re both good, informative pieces that reflect the beauty of a two-paper town: The safely local broadsheet vs. the tokey local tabloid.

Read ’em and beep.

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Text-book Case of Boston Herald’s Appeal

February 25, 2014

Remember those two knuckleheads who had the bright idea of scamming the One Fund Boston out of $2.2 million by claiming an aunt had been maimed in the Marathon bombings?

Last we heard from them, Branden Mattier had filed suit against the State Police and FedEx in December for “[violating] his constitutional rights when he was arrested in July after allegedly signing for a bogus $2.2 million check from One Fund Boston.”

Well, they’re back.

And knuckleheaded as ever, which Laurel Sweet’s Boston Herald report confirms.

‘Real Tears of Joy, Dawg’

Texts show alleged scammers rejoicing over cash

A South End rapper texted his brother he was moved to “real tears of joy, dawg,” upon learning The One Fund Boston had approved them for a $2.2 070213onefundmillion payday based on their bogus claim that a long-dead aunt had lost both her legs to last year’s deadly Boston Marathon bombings, according to grand jury testimony their lawyers have filed in the case.

Branden “The Real SouljaBoy” Mattier, 23, told Domunique Grice, 28, the pair would be moving to “a place where only royalty lives” courtesy of their newfound wealth and the black Mercedes-Benzes they’d soon be driving.

 

Those are just a few of the roughly “40,000 texts between them police said they recovered from Mattier’s iPhone, according to voluminous documents filed Friday in Suffolk Superior Court.”

Here are a few more:

 

Screen Shot 2014-02-25 at 10.49.13 AM

 

According to Sweet, “[t]he brothers were due to face a jury next month on charges of conspiracy, identity fraud and attempting to commit a crime, but the trial has been postponed indefinitely.”

But SouljaBoy will be in court on Thursday hoping to suppress recorded statements he made to police last July.

Maybe the Boston Globe will cover that. Because right now this one is all the Herald’s.