Brownout at the Boston Globe, But Rivers Flows

September 30, 2013

The Boston Herald, which constantly asks itself What can we do for Brown?, scores a hat trick for former Sen. Barn Jacket in today’s edition.

Start with this page-twofer:

 

Picture 1

 

Then Hillary Chabot puts on the pom-poms.

081819brown06Message to Brown: Give N.H. a shot

Be careful what you wish for, Jeanne Shaheen.

The New Hampshire senator and her fellow Democrats have spent the past few days crying wolf about Bay State Republican Scott Brown’s rumored run against Shaheen, blasting out fundraising emails ahead of Brown’s appearance tonight in Hampstead, N.H.

Brown’s former foe, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), chimed in on Friday, and yesterday even failed presidential candidate Howard Dean jumped in, crowing, “New Hampshire deserves a voice, not a Karl Rove pawn.”

 

Dean the Scream mocking you, Scott? That’s bad. So, Chabot says,  “prove ’em wrong.”

Crosstown at the Boston Globe, Brown’s an afterthought sitting at the bottom of Page 3.

 

Picture 3

 

But it’s a whole nother story at the local dailies when it comes to Eugene Rivers. Rather than let him hijack the front page the way the Herald did last week, the Globe actually covers the prattlin’ preacher. From Adrian Walker’s Metro column:

He says vote, but doesn’t

The Rev. Eugene F. Rivers 3d struck such a forceful pose and tone on the cover of the Boston Herald Thursday, in a lament for what he viewed as the black community’s wasted opportunity in last week’s preliminary mayoral election.

In an op-ed column, the cofounder of the Boston TenPoint Coalition castigated black voters for a litany of sins, many of them related to the supposedly unsophisticated failure to coalesce around a single candidate of color.

To Rivers — an energetic advocate for former state representative Charlotte Golar Richie — his community’s failure led to the apparently heartbreaking result that two white Irish men are facing off in the final election for mayor of Boston.

Rivers was especially troubled by the fools who didn’t even bother to vote.

 

The punchline, of course, is that Rivers himself did not vote. Hasn’t for more than 10 years.

So who’s foolin’ who?

 


Mayoral Race Black-and-White in Local Dailies

September 26, 2013

Same town, different places.

The Boston dailies have very – wait for it – different takes on how candidates of color fared in Tuesday’s mayoral preliminary. Start with the front page of today’s Boston Herald.

 

Picture 1

 

Inside story, with Rivers’ byline:

CE1_4373.JPGFractured minority bloc defeated itself

Of the Irish it has jokingly been said by members of their own community that they love to fight and hate to win. And of the Palestinians it is frequently observed, again by their own, that they never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity.

My experience in this mayoral contest has confirmed the belief that we blacks appear to be a combination of the two observations above.

 

(Just wondering: how is it that Eugene Rivers winds up in the news pages of the Herald when his piece clearly belongs on the op-ed page? The paper should be covering the guy, not embedding him in the newshole.)

After establishing that he was a “very public and outspoken” supporter of Charlotte Golar Richie (although, he writes, “this is not a brief for Richie”), Rivers proceeds to blame the absence of a black candidate in the general election on the black community’s failure to unite behind one candidate. “[W]e could have rallied around the individual who was most likely to survive the preliminary election and have a shot at becoming the first minority leader of the city.

That individual, of course, would have been Charlotte Golar Richie. Not to get technical about it.

Crosstown, the Boston Globe didn’t consider it a total loss.

kreiter_richie3_metIn loss, city’s diverse candidates made a mark

They had come this far.

Each had slogged through countless handshakes, participated in numerous debates, and struggled to raise money, while trying to make history as the first minority mayor.

When polls closed and ballots were counted Tuesday, the six candidates of color had collectively garnered 34.7 percent of the votes.

But none of those candidates made the final cut.

 

According to one political observer, the race was a success in “[showing] that these diverse candidates are qualified to be mayor and can get nearly 40,000 votes in the primary.”  But it was a failure in terms of actual political power.

The Globe piece called it a “solid showing” and added this:

More people are engaged in conversations about affordable housing, educational achievement, and jobs for at-risk youths, and the mayoral contenders attribute that to having a diverse pool of candidates in the race, political observers said.

 

Cold comfort, no?

Interestingly, there’s no specific mention of the too-many-candidates-of-color issue, but Darnell Williams, president of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts,  promised a “come-to-Jesus meeting . . . to put the needs of the community before individual interests.” And, he added, that called for “trustworthy ambassadors.”

Your conclusion goes here.

 


That’s What You Get Living In Mayberry

January 30, 2013

Boston residents got a big helping of more of the same following last night’s State of the City address by Mayor-for-Life Thomas M. Menino.

Boston Globe report:

Optimistic Menino makes return to public stage

In a speech by turns sentimental and unabashedly bullish, Mayor Thomas M. Menino returned to the public stage Tuesday night after a lengthy illness and offered a buoyant vision of Boston, celebrating accom plishments and outlining initiatives for the future.

Menino entered Faneuil Hall to thunderous applause from a crowd of 800 that included Governor Deval Patrick, members of Congress, and scores of other elected officials and dignitaries gathered for the mayor’s State of the City address. Waving to the audience, Menino — serenaded by a Kelly Clarkson pop anthem with the lyric, “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” — used a cane to help navigate the 50-foot walk to the stage.

 

Boston Globe editorial:

chin012913menino_met03With a warm speech, Menino shows his rejuvenated spirit

THE HIGHLIGHT of Mayor Menino’s State of the City speech wasn’t its admirable theme of enhancing human potential. It wasn’t in the genuinely impressive progress in city development, with 2,000 units of housing now under construction. And it wasn’t in Menino’s trademark medium-sized initiatives, like his networking plan for women-owned businesses.

Rather, the highlight was Menino himself. In his proud, steady walk to the podium, with only the help of a cane, Menino sent a strong signal that he is back of the job after nearly six weeks in the hospital for a range of ailments, followed by another month of rehab. The mutual affection between Menino and the city was visible in his interaction with the crowd, which whooped and applauded at even corny lines like a joke about Mitt Romney’s “binders full of women.” For his part, Menino offered his sincere thanks to all who helped him and stood by him during his rehabilitation. And he showed his graciousness in other ways, too, such as with a comradely tribute to retiring State Senator Jack Hart.

 

Time to edit Tip O’Neill’s classic “All politics is local.”

Nowadays in Boston, all politics is cozy.

Exhibit Umpteen from Peter Gelzinis’ Boston Herald column:

STU_7922.JPGWalk the walk & talk the talk? Yes, he can!

In the end, it was the irrepressible Rev. Eugene Rivers who captured the most important 50-foot stroll of Thomas Michael Menino’s public life.

“That dude didn’t just walk into this hall tonight, you understand,” Rivers said, of the mayor’s unassisted entrance into Faneuil Hall, “Tommy, man, he gangsta-walked in here, you hear what I’m sayin’?

“The message the man sent out to all those pretenders to the throne was, ‘Any of you wanna piece of this?’ ”

 

Not to get technical about it, but Eugene Rivers is the Hub’s fraud di tutti fraudi. And the ultimate Menino toady.

Any of you wanna piece of that?