It’s Mike Sheehan Day in the Herald!

January 14, 2014

Who’s the hottest guy in town? The hardreading staff votes for Mike Sheehan, who does a daily double in today’s Boston Herald.

Sheehan, the former CEO and current part-time chairman of high-octane ad agency Hill Holliday, is first Heralded here.

One Fund organized in mere hours

Menino reached out to Hub leaders day after bombings

The morning after the April 15 marathon bombings, former Mayor Thomas M. Menino started calling local business and community leaders. He told them they had seven hours to create what would become The One Fund before he announced it at 5 p.m. that night.

“There was an immediate understanding of the urgency at hand,” said James Gallagher, executive vice-president of John Hancock, at an advertising conference in Boston yesterday. “We got underway right away.”

“The number one thing we had was a deadline,” Hill Holiday Chairman Mike Sheehan said, adding he has never worked on a project with the scale or urgency of what would become The One Fund.

“It took 15 minutes to design a logo,” Sheehan said — a blue “1” on a yellow background, modeled after a marathon bib.

“Everybody knew how to do their job, and we just did it,” he said.

 

The next day, Sheehan added, they had “a pile of checks 5 feet high, wide and long.”

Since then Sheehan has been hired as a consultant by the Boston Globe to help improve advertising sales. It’s in that capacity that he does his second turn in the feisty local tabloid.

Adviser: Globe no hobby for John Henry

Former Hill Holliday CEO Mike Sheehan said yesterday his new gig as an advertising adviser to Boston Globe owner John Henry is focused on maximizing revenue, and didn’t rule out a rebranding of the broadsheet, while emphasizing Henry is treating his own Mike Sheehan, chairman of Hill Holliday Jim Gallagher, executive vice president at John Hancock Former mayor Thomas M. Meninorole as a “full-time job.”

“The Globe has a very attractive audience,” Sheehan told the Herald. “Like any media operation, they have to be vigilant about making sure their advertisers know that and that they have great opportunities to reach them.”

Sheehan said there’s no set timetable for how long he’ll be advising the broadsheet. “To be perfectly frank, I just want to help where I can help for as long as it takes to really make this place start humming,” said Sheehan, who is chairman of the Hub ad agency.

 

Of course saying the stately local broadsheet is not a Henry hobby only makes people think it is.

Clever those Heraldniks, eh?


Boston Herald: The Fail of the House of Tsarnaev

December 16, 2013

Okay, well not everyone thinks the Boston Globe’s big Sunday takeout – The Fall of the House of Tsarnaev – is Pulitzer prose the way the hardswooning staff at Campaign Outsider does.

From today’s Boston Herald:

‘SICKENING’

Globe’s bomber tales disgust mother of Marathon survivors

The Stoneham mother whose two sons each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing called “sickening” a nine-page special section in yesterday’s Boston Globe that downplayed Islamic extremism, suggesting the Tsarnaev family’s bad luck, poverty and mental issues had more to do with the plot, while legal experts said BI1E1611.JPGthose claims are likely to figure strongly in any effort to spare surviving accused terrorist Dzhokhar Tsarnaev from the death penalty.

“I hope people don’t fall for this. It’s a joke. There’s no excuse for what those terrorists did,” Liz Norden said of Tsarnaev, 20, and his older brother Tamerlan, who was killed in Watertown in a firefight with police after four people had been murdered and more than 260 others wounded — with numerous amputations.

Both Norden’s sons, JP and Paul, lost their right legs as one of two pressure-cooker bombs packed with shrapnel exploded in Copley Square on April 15.

 

The feisty local tabloid notes that “[a] Globe spokeswoman declined to comment.”  Herald readers, by contrast, are staging a regular Who Struck John in the comments section.

Representative sample:

 

Picture 2

 

From there, they were off to the races (123 comments as of this posting).

Check the Herald’s editorial page tomorrow for Chapter Two.


Tsarnaev Photo Finish

July 21, 2013

Saturday’s local dailies had – wait for it – very different takes on the State Police photos of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s April 19 apprehension by law enforcement officials after a “massive manhunt.”

From the Boston Globe:

Some praise officer for bloody images

Sergeant with State Police faces hearing on action

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The State Police sergeant who released dramatic photos of the capture of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev without the agency’s permission received enthusiastic support Friday from an array of backers.

“The department received dozens upon dozens of calls and e-mails today from citizens around the country supporting Sergeant Murphy and what he did,” State Police spokesman David Procopio said Friday.

Sergeant Sean Murphy, who released the images of a bloody Tsarnaev to Boston Magazine Thursday, also drew praise on social media, including Twitter. He said he released the photos in response to Rolling Stone magazine’s putting Tsarnaev on its cover with an image that critics said made him look glamorous.

“Great photos,” one person wrote of Murphy’s images. “I support your decision.”

 

But not everyone felt the same way, as the Boston Herald’s front page noted:

 

Picture 1

 

The inside scoop:

Dzhokhar TsarnaevDzhokhar’s dream photos?

Cop pics could help defense

The leaked state police photos of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s bloody, woozy capture and surrender in Watertown may be exactly the evidence the Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s legal team needs to help him talk his way out of the death chamber, a former federal prosecutor said yesterday.

“I absolutely think they’re going to be using these in terms of mitigation — that he’s been injured enough, that he suffered, that he was fired upon without firing upon the others,” attorney R. Bradford Bailey told the Herald. “These are the precise types of facts that make a persuasive argument against imposing the death penalty.

“This is certainly material for Judith Clarke and her experience with capital punishment cases,” he added, referring to the San Diego death-penalty specialist who has been appointed to Tsarnaev’s case.

 

This one is, as they say in the betting line, pick ’em.


Being Ed Davis

June 28, 2013

Police Commissioner Ed Davis has officially become a litmus test in Boston’s mayoral race.

It started with this piece in Wednesday’s Boston Herald:

STON1329.JPGConley promises to retain top cop

Puts feud with Davis behind him

Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley yesterday vowed to keep Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis if elected mayor, as a rift between the two men appears to have ended.

“Commissioner Davis and I have had a very close working relationship for many years now. We are in constant communication anytime there are issues involving the public safety in Boston,” Conley told the Herald.

In the past, the DA and Davis have clashed over jurisdictional issues and strategies for dealing with Boston’s homicide rate.

 

That triggered this piece in Thursday’s Boston Globe (which credited the Herald for raising the subject):

Boghosian_11menino3_METHalf of hopefuls for mayor would retain Davis

Following the Boston Marathon bombings in April, Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis was praised for his steady presence during the ordeal and regaled with an honorary degree. His name was even bandied about as a possible candidate for mayor.

Davis decided to sit it out, but his name has remained part of the race, with questions arising about whether he would keep his post under a new leader at City Hall.

Half of the 12 mayoral candidates contacted by the Globe Wednesday said they would ask him to stay on. Five would not commit to keeping him. One did not respond to the question.

 

(Interesting foreground/background contrast in the photos, yeah?)

Related Globe piece on the mayoral candidate breakdown:

Yes: Felix Arroyo, John Barros, Bill Walczak, Robert Consalvo, Martin Walsh, Dan Conley.

Still deciding: Charles Clemons Jr., John Connolly, Charlotte Golar Richie, Michael Ross, David James Wyatt.

Did not respond: Charles Yancey.

Yet to comment: Ed Davis.

Stay tuned.


Marathon Bombing Memorial Advertisers Get More and More Obscure

April 29, 2013

In the two weeks since the tragic Boston Marathon bombings, we’ve seen a goodly number of tribute ads from the likes of Verizon, Bloomingdale’s, even the City of New York Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association. But today’s installments come from, well, out of nowhere.

In the Boston Globe:

 

Picture 1

 

In the Boston Herald:

 

Picture 2

 

Yeah, that’s what we said. Who are these people?

Turns out Flying Cross is “[t]he leading authority in uniform systems with over 170 years’ experience outfitting the best—and toughest—customers. Serving with Distinction since 1842.”

Okaaaay.

And The Produce Connection “[services] over 200 different food service venues throughout New England, many of them for over 20 years now. Many of our customers have become our close friends as we’ve successfully worked to meet their needs every day with the same commitment.”

Okaaaay.

We gotta ask: Are the Marathon bombings turning into just another marketing opportunity? (10% of our next two columns donated to The One Fund Boston!!)

It’s sure starting to feel that way.


Globe Runs Massive Marathon Bombing Tick-Tock; Herald, a Tic

April 28, 2013

From our Compare & Contrast in Clear Idiomatic English desk

Some days – very often Sundays – the difference between the local dailies is starker than usual. Today is one such day.

The Boston Globe has published what, so far at least, is the definitive chronicle of the five days between the bombings at the Boston Marathon finish line and the apprehension of the surviving bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Page One:

 

Picture 4

 

What follows is an eight-page reconstruction of the week’s events “based on more than 100 interviews with police, government officials, and witnesses.”

The extensive timeline included in the special section features extensive infographics like this one (click to enlarge):

 

Picture 5

 

Meanwhile, the Boston Herald tossed off this (click to enlarge):

 

Picture 3

 

No one expects the feisty local tabloid can do the sort of flood-the-zone, Pulitzer-seeking coverage the Globe can. But you’d think it could certainly do better than “Rude awakening.”

Then again, maybe the hardreading staff needs to wake up itself, and lower the bar accordingly.

 


Herald Revising History Again (Bombing Coverage Coverup II)

April 28, 2013

The Boston Herald continues to criticize news organizations that erroneously reported an arrest  two days after the Marathon bombings – without noting that the feisty local tabloid itself did exactly the same thing.

Exhibit A: The Herald’s Press Party webbcast on Friday, which the hardworking staff at Campaign Outsider previously chronicled.

Exhibit B : Today’s op-ed by retired Heraldnik Guy Darst.

Always a new(s) way to blunder

Let’s not be too hard on the unfortunate John King and CNN for erroneously reporting in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing that a suspect had been arrested. The pressures of a 24/7 news cycle are nothing new to a special class of journalists who have worked under them for more than a century, reporters for the wire services. Some of their blunders are legendary — and instructive.

The leading wire service, the Associated Press, also reported an arrest just as King did.

 

Just as numerous news outlets – including the Herald – did. Handy referesher chart from the excellent Chart Girl:

ARREST_900

 

The Herald should grow up and take its lumps for inaccurate reporting, instead of compounding it with even more.