Globe Tracy Miner Update Missing Bryon Hefner Link

February 27, 2019

From our Late to the Party of the First Part desk

Nice cameo in yesterday’s Boston Globe of legal eagle Tracy Miner’s flight from her old law firm to her own.

Lawyer ‘energized’ with starting own firm

Tracy Miner would tell you that there aren’t many woman-owned law firms that specialize in criminal work.

That’s probably true. But you know what’s also rare? Lawyers who start their own firms while they’re in the midst of one of the city’s biggest white-collar criminal trials.

Miner can claim both honors. She launched Miner Orkand Siddall LP earlier this month, just as the Insys Therapeutics trial was getting underway. The racketeering case revolves around federal prosecutors’ claims that Insys executives improperly marketed the painkiller Subsys to doctors. Miner represents Mike Gurry, a former vice president at the drug company and one of the defendants in the case.

 

Jon Chesto’s Bold Types piece also mentions Miner’s defense counseling for “state lawmaker Vincent Piro, who had been accused of attempted extortion involving two liquor licenses that a developer sought for the Assembly Square Mall in Somerville” and “John Connolly, who was charged with taking bribes and tipping off James ‘Whitey’ Bulger to a secret federal indictment that enabled him to flee and remain on the run for 16 years.” (Piro got off; Connolly obviously did not.)

But the normally buttoned-down Chesto inexplicably fails to mention Miner’s highest profile current client: Bryon Hefner, the estranged husband of former State Senate President Stan Rosenberg. Last we saw, Hefner – who’s been accused by several men of sexual assault – goes on trial March 25.

Not exactly a minor omission. Considering Chesto’s track record, though, give him a mulligan, eh?

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Boston Herald Gets Props From Boston Globe & NYT!

July 8, 2018

Stop the presses! The feisty local tabloid was totally legit yesterday!

Start with the Boston Globe, where correspondent Matt Stout (formerly of the Boston Herald) filed this report.

Judge overseeing Hefner lawsuit steps down

The Superior Court judge who approved a request to shield the name of the man suing former Senate president Stanley C. Rosenberg and his husband, Bryon Hefner, abruptly stepped down from the civil case Friday, shortly after the two filed paperwork opposing it.

Judge Debra A. Squires-Lee did not say why she recused herself from the case against Hefner and Rosenberg, which alleges that Hefner sexually assaulted a then-State House aide and that Rosenberg “knew or was aware” that Hefner posed a risk to others.

The aide, identified as John Doe in court filings, said Hefner sexually assaulted him at least three times in 2015 and 2016.

 

Make Joe Sciacca go nuts (bad division) tenth graf:

The Boston Herald first reported Rosenberg and Hefner’s filings.

 

Then again, Jennifer Schuessler’s New York Times piece yesterday about BSO flutist Elizabeth Rowe’s equal-pay lawsuit quite likely eased the pain.

Star Flutist Sues Boston Symphony Over Pay Equity

The top flutist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra has filed a gender pay discrimination suit against the ensemble, claiming that her compensation is only about 75 percent that of her closest comparable colleague, the orchestra’s principal oboist, who is a man.

The suit, which was filed on Monday by Elizabeth Rowe, the orchestra’s principal flutist and one of its most prominent musicians, appears to be the first under a new law in Massachusetts that requires equal pay for “comparable work.” The law was passed in 2016, but it did not go into effect until Sunday, after employers had two years to rectify disparities.

 

Make Joe Sciacca go nuts (good division) fifth graf:

[A]ccording to Ms. Rowe’s lawsuit, which seeks $200,000 in unpaid wages, pay disparities can be significant. Ms. Rowe, 44, is paid about $70,000 less each year than John Ferrillo, 62, the principal oboist, based on data in the lawsuit and tax records. That is despite the fact that they play next to each other and are both “leaders of the orchestra in similarly demanding artistic roles,” according to the lawsuit, which was first reported by The Boston Herald.

 

That, my friends, is music to the hungry local tabloid’s ears.


Globe Completes Defenestration of Bryon Hefner

December 23, 2014

The coup de grâce came, fittingly, on Page One of today’s Boston Globe.

State senator’s partner to leave his PR job

Blames Globe for departure

rosenberg-big[1]

In a sudden shift from an announcement over the weekend, the domestic partner of presumptive Senate president Stanley C. Rosenberg abruptly resigned Monday from his position at a politically connected Boston communications firm.

Bryon Hefner, in an e-mailed statement to the Globe, blamed the newspaper for driving him out of his job working as a public relations staff member for Regan Communications.

Late Saturday the Regan firm, which offers potential clients Beacon Hill connections and help with lobbying, had said it was reassigning Hefner from its Boston headquarters to its Florida office.

 

Hefner, who has been absolutely sandblasted by the stately local broadsheet for the past three weeks, wrote in his email to the paper, “The Boston Globe has rejected my transfer to Florida, identifying it as ‘not being far enough away’ if I am still in a relationship with my partner of over six years . . . The Boston Globe has forced me, just days before Christmas, to choose between my personal and professional life.’’

Globe reporter Frank Phillips, who (along with Jim O’Sullivan) has played Javert to Hefner’s Jean Valjean, wrote this in response:

It was not immediately clear what Hefner was referring to when he wrote that the newspaper had “rejected” the Florida move. Neither Hefner nor Rosenberg responded to requests for comment.

 

Not immediately clear? Probably never gonna be clear – because it’s most likely some crybaby concoction from a kid who got too big for his britches, as my old man used to say. (Here’s the Globe story on Regan’s dispatching of Hefner to Florida. No hint of it “not being far enough away,” so it’s still not clear where Hefner’s quotation marks came from. Unless the Globe is holding out on us.)

Regardless: Bryon, we hardly knew ye. But that was more than enough for most.