Gov. Baker Flags S.C. Gaffe for Globe, Not Herald

June 19, 2015

As the hardreading staff has repeatedly noted, the Boston Herald is pretty much the wallflower at the advertising dance in the local dailies. (This week too!) But today the Herald plays second fiddle on Beacon Hill as well.

Gov. Charlie Baker (R-Mulligan, Please) tried to get out in front of some ill-advised remarks on the radio yesterday by contacting the Boston Globe to take it all back.

Metro Page One:

Baker apologizes for flag remarks

Says Confederate symbol should not fly in capitols

Governor Charlie Baker apologized on Thursday for remarks he made earlier in the day defending the rights of state capitols to fly the Confederate flag, initially calling it a matter of “tradition.”03homelesspic02

Baker said in an early-afternoon radio interview that states should be entitled to decide whether to fly the Confederate flag at their capitols, laying out a brief argument for local government. But he later backtracked and said he believed the controversial symbol should be removed.

In a telephone interview on Thursday evening, Baker said he had “heard from some friends of mine.” Their message, he said: “Basically: What were you thinking?”


Indeed. What Baker wasn’t thinking was to call the Boston Herald after the “Thursday evening call [to Globe reporter Jim O’Sullivan] arranged hastily by aides.”

One would think the fringey local tabloid would at least have played catch-up on its website today, but one would be wrong.

So, to recap:

By all appearances Charlie Baker came to his senses about whether the Confederate flag should fly in state capitols and wanted to walk back his comments from earlier in the day. So he contacted the Globe but not the Herald. Bad news for the Heraldniks.

(We just sent an email to Jim O’ Sullivan asking him if that’s an accurate summary. We will, as always, keep you posted.)

UPDATE: Jim O’Sullivan tells us that he offered to talk to Baker if the governor wanted to revise or amend his comments, then aides set up the phone call. So, to re-recap: Just sharper reporting at the Boston Globe. That is all.


Globe Completes Defenestration of Bryon Hefner

December 23, 2014

The coup de grâce came, fittingly, on Page One of today’s Boston Globe.

State senator’s partner to leave his PR job

Blames Globe for departure


In a sudden shift from an announcement over the weekend, the domestic partner of presumptive Senate president Stanley C. Rosenberg abruptly resigned Monday from his position at a politically connected Boston communications firm.

Bryon Hefner, in an e-mailed statement to the Globe, blamed the newspaper for driving him out of his job working as a public relations staff member for Regan Communications.

Late Saturday the Regan firm, which offers potential clients Beacon Hill connections and help with lobbying, had said it was reassigning Hefner from its Boston headquarters to its Florida office.


Hefner, who has been absolutely sandblasted by the stately local broadsheet for the past three weeks, wrote in his email to the paper, “The Boston Globe has rejected my transfer to Florida, identifying it as ‘not being far enough away’ if I am still in a relationship with my partner of over six years . . . The Boston Globe has forced me, just days before Christmas, to choose between my personal and professional life.’’

Globe reporter Frank Phillips, who (along with Jim O’Sullivan) has played Javert to Hefner’s Jean Valjean, wrote this in response:

It was not immediately clear what Hefner was referring to when he wrote that the newspaper had “rejected” the Florida move. Neither Hefner nor Rosenberg responded to requests for comment.


Not immediately clear? Probably never gonna be clear – because it’s most likely some crybaby concoction from a kid who got too big for his britches, as my old man used to say. (Here’s the Globe story on Regan’s dispatching of Hefner to Florida. No hint of it “not being far enough away,” so it’s still not clear where Hefner’s quotation marks came from. Unless the Globe is holding out on us.)

Regardless: Bryon, we hardly knew ye. But that was more than enough for most.