Brown Out, The Great Mentioner In

February 2, 2013

Now that former Sen. Scott Brown (R-$$$) has dropped out of the running for the upcoming special election for U.S. Senate, the local dailies are putting forth very – wait for it – different lists of potential fill-ins.

The Boston Globe wins the coveted Ya Think? award with this headline on its lead editorial:

Mass. Republicans should move to fill void left by Brown

 

In the Globe’s news section, the Great Mentioner rounds up the usual suspects:

The GOP is suddenly grasping for alternatives, hoping to press into service known figures such as former governor William F. Weld, former lieutenant governor Kerry Healey, or Richard R. Tisei, the former state Senate minority leader.

 

But then the GM tosses in a couple of unusual suspects:

State Representative Daniel Winslow, a Norfolk Republican, said he will also take the next few days to consider a potential run. Gabriel E. Gomez, a wealthy businessman and a former Navy SEAL and fighter pilot from Cohasset, said he is very likely to get into the race.

 

Crosstown at the Herald, meanwhile, they’re living in an entirely different universe, as today’s Page One attests (via The Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages):

MA_BH

 

That inset at the lower right refers to Brown’s first announcing his decision in a text message (“U r the first to know I am not running”) to Herald columnist Howie Carr. The rest of the front page? Yikes.

But the Herald goes all in with a two-page spread:

Picture 1

 

For the feisty local tabloid, what’s the only thing better than Scott Brown running for U.S. Senate?

Scott Brown not running for U.S. Senate.


Baker’s ‘Doesn’t’ in U.S. Senate Speculation

January 26, 2013

Lots of political prognostication in the local dailies today about who might do what in the race to fill the U.S. Senate seat about to be vacated by John Kerry (D-Am I Secretary of State Now?).

Start with the the Boston Herald, which turns half of Page One over to the prospects of Rep. Stephen (Peek-a-Boo) Lynch (via the Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages).

MA_BH

 

Lynch earns a split decision inside: Hillary Chabot’s piece has the headline, “Menino Shaping Up As Ace in Hole for Lynch,” while Joe Battenfeld’s column presents a less-optimistic slant:

MATT0018.JPGBotched report spells trouble for pol

Even by Massachusetts political standards, this was one of the worst non-campaign announcements ever.

U.S. Rep. Stephen F. Lynch’s bungled will-he-or-won’t-he drama over his possible entrance into the U.S. Senate fight left voters confused and Democratic leaders shaking their heads — not a great start for a campaign.

If Lynch does announce he’s getting in the Democratic primary against U.S. Rep. Edward J. Markey — and many Democrats and Lynch supporters are still convinced he will — the first question will be: “When did you decide to run — before or after your advisers prematurely leaked word you were running and you denied it?”

 

Ouch.

Crosstown-rival Boston Globe gives its conjecturing the power position: Page One (via ditto) upper right above the fold:

Picture 1

 

The Frank Phillips/Michael Levenson piece indicates that Scott Brown (R-Show Me the Money) might be leaning toward skipping a third Senate bakeoff in three years and running instead for governor in 2014. Enter the Great Mentioner, starting with former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld:

Weld did not return calls seeking comment. But his associates said it is highly unlikely the former governor, who returned to Boston this fall after living in New York for a dozen years, would plunge back into politics.

“He has no interest,’’ said Stephen Tocco, a partner with Weld at ML Strategies, a public affairs consulting firm. “He is too busy growing his practice and settling into Massachusetts.’’

 

Not to mention Weld has said (as noted by the hardreading staff) that not running for office is a condition of his employment at ML Strategies. Although – yes, yes – contracts are made to be broken.

Regardless, next?

Another high-profile Republican — Kerry Healey, the former lieutenant governor — did not rule out a Senate candidacy, saying only that it is “premature to say’’ if she would be interested in the seat if Brown does not run.

 

Conspicuous by his absence was Charlie Baker, who ran a credible if largely uninspired campaign for governor in 2010. It will be interesting to see if in the next round of chinstroking, Baker is part of the mix.


‘Binder’ Blinders at the Boston Herald?

October 18, 2012

The Binders Full of Women rumpus,the latest screaming meme in the flogosphere, has turned the spotlight on Mitt Romney’s hiring record as Massachusetts governor from 2003-2007. The local dailies both take a look at that record today, with differing results (stop the presses, eh?).

From the Boston Herald:

Mitt Romney’s ‘binders of women’ comment is going full clip

The frenzy whipped up by Mitt Romney’s claims of poring over “binders full of woman” to ensure his cabinet wasn’t male-dominated drew a sharp response from both sides of the aisle yesterday — Democrats disputing the notion he actively sought out female candidates and Republicans rushing to defend his Bay State record.

Romney, in Tuesday’s debate, said his administration “took a concerted effort to go out and find women” for his cabinet, adding he turned to women’s groups, who provided “binders full of women” . . .

Kerry Healey, Romney’s former lieutenant governor, noted women in top positions included Chief of Staff Beth Myers and policy adviser Cindy Gillespie.

“He has surrounded himself with talented women’s voices,” Healey said last night. The Herald reported during Romney’s administration that the percentage of women in top jobs rose only slightly, from 30 percent to 31 percent, but MassGAP did not fault him, telling the Herald in 2006 three-fourths of top jobs had holdovers.

The Boston Globe, however, tells a different – and less flattering – tale:

The story behind Mitt Romney’s ‘binders full of women’

WASHINGTON — In the debate on Tuesday night, Mitt Romney said that he made every effort to find qualified women for Cabinet positions when he was governor of Massachusetts.

“Well, gosh,” he said he told his staff who had an abundance of male applicants, “can’t we find some — some women that are also qualified?”

“I went to a number of women’s groups and said, ‘Can you help us find folks?’ ” Romney added. “And they brought us whole binders full of women.”

The awkward turn of phrase — “binders full of women” — immediately took off online and triggered a day of back and forth between Democrats and Republicans over who can best represent concerns of women. A Facebook page, called “Binders Full of Women,” was created and by midday had nearly 300,000 likes. Dan Lacey, an artist known for political parodies, was selling a painting on eBay of Romney holding two binders with female legs coming out of them. A Tumblr page, with spoof images, was created, and President Obama resurrected the line during a campaign stop in Iowa.

That’s not the less flattering part, though. This is:

About midway through Romney’s four-year term, 42 percent of his 33 new appointments were women, according to a study done by the UMass Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy using some of the data collected by MassGAP.

But over the next two years, women made up only 25 percent of the 64 new appointments Romney made. By the end of his term, women made up 27.6 percent of those in high-ranking positions overall, which was slightly lower than it was before Romney took office.

As always in this post-truth presidential election, pick the numbers that suit you best.