Columbia Gas: No One in Lawrence Reads the Herald

October 4, 2018

Columbia Gas, which oversaw the destruction of roughly 80 homes; the death of Leonel Rondon, a student at Phoenix Charter Academy; over two dozen injuries; and the disruption of thousands of other lives, promises to restore service to Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover by November 19th.

But . . .

The company is also hedging its bets, as yesterday’s full-page Boston Globe ad from Columbia Gasbag Joe Hamrock indicates.

 

 

Nuts to deadlines graf.

 

 

Notice first that Columbia Gas is outsourcing part of its responsibility for the recovery to “local, state and federal officials and other dedicated people and organizations.”

Also notice that there’s no mention of the November 19th deadline.

Also also notice that the ad did not run in the Boston Herald, yet another example of Boston institutions overlooking the thirsty local tabloid.

No wonder we’re destined to be a One-Daily Town.

P.S. It’s entirely coincidental that this is the front page of today’s Herald

 

 

and this is Metro Page One of the Globe.

 

 

 

Entirely.

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Globe Steals Herald Front Page

November 18, 2013

Today’s Boston daily double features a rarity: The Boston Globe front-pages what should have been the Boston Herald’s Page One.

First, here’s what the feisty local tabloid actually ran:

 

Picture 1

 

That’s fine – gotta do the Pats when it’s Monday Night Football and Coakley’s jumping on the junkets is good (and it beat the Globe). But the Health-Connector-Is-Worse-Than-Obamacare story is thrice-told news at this point. It doesn’t really merit another front page hit.

Crosstown, the Globe’s Page One has the story the Herald should have had.

Boston police officers wary of GPS for cruisers

Fear too much scrutiny of police under city’s plan

The pending use of GPS tracking devices, slated to be installed in Boston police cruisers, has many officers worried that commanders will monitor their every move while supervisors insist the system will improve their response to emergencies.davis-big-10025

The change, a result of contract negotiations between the city and the patrol officers union, puts Boston in league with small-town departments across the state and big-city agencies across the country that have installed global positioning systems in cruisers.

Boston police administrators say the system gives dispatchers the ability to see where officers are, rather than wait for a radio response. Using GPS, they say, accelerates their response to a call for a shooting or an armed robbery.

 

Just think how that translates to the Herald’s front page, all donuts and dozing off. Can’t you see it?

Well, there’s always tomorrow.