Boston Globe Home Delivery Not Yet Gone Chernobyl

June 23, 2017

You splendid readers undoubtedly remember the Great Home Delivery Meltdown from last year when the Boston Globe switched distributors much to the paper’s regret.

This week the Globe not only moved into new downtown digs at 53 State Street, it also switched printing facilities, as Peter Doucette, Chief Consumer Revenue Officer, informed subscribers in an email.

 

 

That was Monday. All went well for three full days. Then came this.

 

 

Indeed, no Globe arrived yesterday at the Global Worldwide Headquarters of Two-Daily Town. When the same email came this morning, the hardreading staff braced itself for more home delivery headaches.

But lo and behold, both papers did arrive today.

So, well done, you former Morrissey Boulevardiers.

And mazel tov on the new home.

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Boston Globe Falls For Trumped Up Aussie Charge

February 3, 2017

From our Just Not the Facts desk

The Morrissey Boulevardiers have nabbed our uncoveted Boo Daily Town award for this item in today’s Capital section.

 

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As numerous fact checkers have pointed out, they’re not “illegal immigrants,” they’re refugees. Here’s Washington Post Fact Checker, Michelle Ye Hee Lee.

Trump is referring to the estimated 1,250 (not “thousands”) refugees and asylum seekers that the United States, under President Barack Obama, agreed to accept from an Australian detention center. Refugees and asylum seekers who arrive illegally by boat in Australia are called “illegal maritime arrivals.” They can apply for two types of temporary visas, and some may qualify to apply for permanent residency.

 

(To be fair graf goes here)

To be fair, Politifact rated Trump’s tweet Half-True. But we sorta expect more than half truths from the Globe, no?


Extra! Boston Herald Credits Globe Twice in One Day!

April 25, 2016

From our Credit Where Credit’s Due desk

In the course of covering local events, the Boston dailies often piggyback on one another’s stories, most often without acknowledging that the rival paper got there first. (See, for example, the Boston Globe’s routine drafting off the Boston Herald’s Grand Prix of Boston coverage.)

But sometimes one of the dailies does the right thing. Spoiler alert: It isn’t the Globe.

Page One of yesterday’s Boston Sunday Globe featured this piece about Mayor Martin J. Wiretap.

Walsh is drawn into federal labor probe

Before he was mayor, when Walsh was a labor leader, he was heard on a wiretap saying he had warned a developer using non-union workers. Walsh denies it.

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A sweeping federal investigation into allegations of strong-arm tactics by unions has triggered a wave of subpoenas to union leaders, developers, and Boston City Hall staff, bringing scrutiny to Mayor Martin J. Walsh’s administration and his work as a labor leader before taking office in 2014, according to people familiar with the inquiry.

At issue in the investigation is whether labor officials threatened developers and business people who hired nonunion workers on their projects. Walsh, though apparently not an early focus of the probe, became drawn into it through wiretaps on which he was recorded in 2012, saying he had told a development company it would face permitting problems on a planned Boston high-rise unless it used union labor at another project in Somerville, according to people familiar with the tapes.

 

Well that’s a big story and you knew right off it would be in the Herald today and sure enough it gets a two-page spread.

 

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Nothing unusual there. But what does stand out are the two times the Globe is credited with breaking the story, first in Hillary Chabot’s piece:

Walsh yesterday shook off suggestions that a federal inquiry into labor strong-arming has any connection to his work as mayor. The Boston Globe reported that Walsh as the head of Boston Building Trades Council was heard on a wiretap in 2012 saying he had warned a developer to get union workers on a Somerville project or risk losing Boston permits.

 

Then a second time in this piece by Jack Encarnacao and Laurel Sweet:

The wiretapped statement was captured during a conversation between Walsh, then-head of the Boston Building and Construction Trades Council, and Laborers Local 22 leader Anthony Perrone, the Boston Globe reported yesterday citing unnamed sources.

 

Good for you, Heraldniks!

And, hey, you Morrissey Boulevardiers: Take a lesson, wouldja?


Boston Dailies Take Turns Beating One Another

January 14, 2016

. . . on the dopey Chandler Jones story, that is.

Yesterday it was all Boston Herald, starting with this Erin Smith/Laurel Sweet story on page two.

Details of Chandler Jones’ ER visit remain murky

Patriots defensive end Chandler Jones was rushed to Norwood Hospital Sunday morning after he showed up at the Foxboro Police Department with a medical Screen Shot 2016-01-14 at 1.11.19 PMemergency, police dispatch records show.

But police officials won’t say what the emergency was and the police chief confirmed information was deleted from dispatch records before they were released to the Herald yesterday.

Dispatch records show Jones arrived at the police station at 7:42 a.m. Sunday and was evaluated by fire and EMS officials before being transported to Norwood Hospital just after 8 a.m.

 

Regardless, Foxboro police Chief 
Edward T. O’Leary did an end run around the Herald’s questions, “[denying] his department and officers had any dealing with Jones over the weekend and 
[adding] the only time he’d ever seen Jones was being interviewed on television.”

That proved to be entirely false. But why get technical about it.

Crosstown, the Boston Globe ate the firsty local tabloid’s dust, running a story on D5 that mentioned the Herald six times in 11 paragraphs.

But today the tables were turned.The Morrissey Boulevardiers have this Jim McBride/Christopher Gasper piece on D1.

Bad drug reaction cited

Source: Jones used synthetic marijuana

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FOXBOROUGH — Chandler Jones had a bad reaction to synthetic marijuana leading to his admittance to Norwood Hospital Sunday, a source familiar with the situation told the Globe Wednesday.

The source said Jones lives near the Foxborough police station and walked there to seek help after he had the reaction.

 

Crosstown the other way, the Fargo Street Gang has a solid follow-up today, but not all the details.

Dispatch records show a Foxboro officer also secured Jones’ residence during the Sunday incident.

“The front door’s open,” the officer says when he arrives at Jones’ home, which is about a block from the station, and later reports: “Yeah, I got his keys off the kitchen table. I was able to lock the front door. If you want to just pass along to the fire he was definitely involved in Class D — Delta — before this happened, just so they know.”

Delta is a police call sign to denote the letter D, while Class D is a category of controlled substances under the state’s drug laws, according to a law enforcement source. Class D drugs include marijuana and some prescription drugs, which can be legal.

 

So there’s more difference between the Boston dailies than how they spell Foxboro(ugh). That’s just swell.