Trump Coat Holder Howie Carr Join$ Mar-a-Lago

February 7, 2017

As the hardreading staff has noted, smaller-all-the-time radio personality Howie Carr has been a dedicated Trumpkin from the very start.

(Exhibit A: Carr’s groveling appearance at the Bochanalia that the autoheirotic Ernie Boch Jr. threw for Trump back in 2015.)

Later, there was this fanboy wet kiss in Carr’s Boston Herald column.

Living large at Mar-a-Lago

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-12-13-36-am

PALM BEACH, Fla. — So here was President-elect Donald Trump, in a tuxedo, talking to 800 or so formally dressed guests in the ballroom at his Mar-a-Lago Club here on New Year’s Eve.

“Again, I want to thank my members,” he said. “I don’t really care too much about their guests because the ones I really care about are the members. I don’t give a (bleep) about their guests. I just love my members.”

 

Of which Howie Carr is now one, according to Politico Playbook.

MORE NEW MAR-A-LAGO MEMBERS: Daniel Bouaziz and Sophia Baratashvili, Howie and Kathy Carr, Gil Cohen and Paul Gervais, Jean Doyen De Montaillou and Michael Kovner, Robert and Susan Falk, Diane Lokey Farb, Carol . . .

 

Two questions:

1) Did Carr get the Coat Holder Discount for the newly calibrated $200,000 Mar-a-Lago membership fee?

2) Which local daily will be the first to pick up on Carr’s quantum leap in social status?

We’re guessing the Herald.

But you never know.


Boston Globe Jumps on Price-Gouging Bandwagon

November 27, 2014

Well the hardreading staff was checking out Politico Playbook (yes, Mike Allen is crazy enough to post on Thanksgiving and, yes, we’re crazy enough to read it on Thanksgiving) when we came across this:

TODAY’S PLEASINGLY PLUMP WashPost has 34 Black Friday circulars in the blue bag (and doubles the usual weekday cover price to $2.50). The Raleigh News & Observer, with 43 inserts, triples the normal price to $3. The garish cover of the Richmond Times-Dispatch promises “up to 900 pages of savings” (and profit for the paper), and raises the price from $1.25 to $3.50 (even gouging subscribers with a surcharge). The Dallas Morning News bills today’s paper as “Biggest issue, biggest deals of the year … SPECIAL PRICE $3” – twice the usual price for a weekday issue.

 

Hmmm, we bethought ourselves – wonder what the locals did on the pricing front. So we went to the front pages.

Today’s Boston Globe:

 

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Regular weekday Globe:

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-27 at 2.09.25 PM

 

Notice that the snowbirds get the same price both days, likely because they didn’t get the umpteen Doorbuster! inserts.

Crosstown at today’s Boston Herald:

 

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Yesterday’s Herald:

 

 

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In case you’re wondering, the catchpenny local tabloid was chockablock with inserts. But it was no Pursebuster! The stately local broadsheet should take notice.


It’s Good to Live in a Two-Times Co. Town (Paywall Edition)

December 9, 2012

As newspaper revenues continue to go down like the Hindenburg, more and more dailies are looking to erect paywalls to corral new cashflow.

Exhibit Umpteen: The Washington Post.

From David Carr’s post on the New York Times Media Decoder blog (via Politico’s Playbook):

fence-decoder-blog480Pay Wall Push: Why Newspapers Are Hopping Over the Picket Fence

When The Wall Street Journal broke the news that The Washington Post was likely to start charging for online content sometime next year, it should not have come as a surprise, but it did.

The shock had something to do with the certainty that Donald Graham, chairman of the Washington Post Company, has always displayed on the subject. He has long had serious reservations about putting the work of his company’s journalists behind a wall. According to GigaOm, he explained it in the following way to Walter Isaacson at an Aspen Institute event:

The New York Times or Wall Street Journal can say we’re going to charge, but we’re not going to charge you if you subscribe to the newspaper. The Washington Post circulates in print only around Washington, D.C., but way over 90 percent – I think over 95 percent of our Internet audience is outside Washington, D.C. We can’t offer you that print or online choice. So, the pay model would work very differently for us.

But now The Post is contemplating a model in which the homepage and section fronts will be free, but the rest will require a subscription, which is a pretty nifty way to allow for snacking while hoping that people stick around to eat.

 

But some who’ve gone this route aren’t getting all that many bites. Among them is NYT kissin’ cousin the Boston Globe. Here’s what Carr writes about the two:

The New York Times’s positive experience with online subscriptions is probably not one that will scale across the industry. As a national newspaper with international resources, The Times is fishing in a pool of many millions of potential readers, so the fact over a half a million of that audience has opted in is a good sign for the organization, but not necessarily for the industry.

Mr. Graham noted that The Boston Globe, the former home of the incoming Post editor Martin Baron and a high-quality publication, had just 25,000 people sign up. That is a scary low number. But it is a place to begin.

 

Yeah, so’s zero. That don’t make it good news.