IBEW = Invisible Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

April 18, 2016

And CWA = Communications Wankers of America.

At least that’s how it looks in the local dailies. For the past week Verizon has been running this one-two punch of full-page ads in the Boston Globe (but, of course, not the Herald).

 

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Actually, there’s plenty to strike about according to two labor unions involved (and this Verizon worker – the Dickensian-named Jazmin Sypher – in a Guardian op-ed) but you’d never know it from the Communications Workers of America or the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.

Hey, nudniks: At least run a couple of ads in the Boston Herald, eh? Those are your peeps at the thirsty local tabloid.

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Seamus on the Boston Herald! STILL No Heaney Obit

September 2, 2013

Today marks the third edition of the Boston Herald to ignore the death of the great Seamus Heaney.

It’s not like anyone at the dicey local tabloid would have to actually read some of Heaney’s poetry. They could just run a wire story, they way they did today with David Frost’s obituary.

 

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Better yet, they could pick up this appreciation by Roy Foster in The Guardian:

Obs New Review this weekend Please leave !!!Seamus Heaney remembered

Seamus Heaney, who has died at the age of 74, was a poet of immense power, a brilliant intellect, an inspiration to others – and the best of company

My first thought on hearing the immeasurably sad news of Seamus Heaney‘s death was a sensation of a great tree having fallen: that sense of empty space, desolation, uprooting. Heaney’s place in Irish culture – not just in Irish poetry – was often compared to that of WB Yeats, particularly after he followed Yeats in winning the Nobel prize in 1995. He possessed what he himself ascribed to Yeats, “the gift of establishing authority within a culture”. But whereas Yeats’s shadow was seen, by some of his younger contemporaries at least, as blotting out the sun and stunting the growth of the surrounding forest, Heaney’s great presence let in the light. Part of this was bound up in his own abundant personality. Generosity, amplitude and sympathy characterised his dealings with people at every level, and he was the stellar best of company. It was as if he had learned the lesson prescribed (though not really followed) by Yeats: that the creative soul, “all hatred driven hence”, might recover “radical innocence” in being “self-delighting, self-appeasing, self-affrighting”.

For God’s sake, Heraldniks – just run something.

London (Marathon) Calling

April 22, 2013

Boston was on the mind of everyone who ran the London Marathon yesterday, as Page One of The Guardian attests (via the Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages).

 

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And London was on the mind of the Boston dailies – especially the Globe, which sent sportswriter Shira Springer over there to cover the event.

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Boston firmly in the thoughts of Londoners

LONDON — Moments after finishing the London Marathon, Harry Neynens struggled with his emotions. He started to describe crossing the finish line Sunday amid cheering crowds, then stopped. He needed a moment to collect his thoughts, to choke back tears. He started his story again. This time, the narrative began back on Boylston Street in Boston.

For Neynens, the 2013 London Marathon and 2013 Boston Marathon always will be linked. A week ago, Neynens, who lives in Enfield, Nova Scotia, waited on Boylston Street for his wife, Colleen, to finish Boston. Colleen spotted Harry in the crowd at the 26-mile mark, ran over, and kissed her husband. Then Harry walked down Boylston Street to catch up with Colleen once she crossed the line. She finished as 4 hours 7 minutes 12 seconds flashed on the race clock. He found himself 100 yards away from the bomb explosions and he saw some of the critically injured victims.

“I had a hard day out here,” said Neynens, who wore a 2013 Boston Marathon hat during his London run and finished in 2:48:09. “I was hurting, but obviously I was not hurting near as much as the injuries that I saw, people who lost their legs. I finished for all those people who were hurt and those people who couldn’t finish last Monday.

“There was a banner we passed around Mile 25 that said, ‘Run if you can. Walk if you must. But finish for Boston.’ That meant a lot to everybody. It was great to see the support of everybody out there for the runners and for Boston.”

 

It went beyond moral support, as this Associated Press report in the Boston Herald noted:

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For a day, at least, Boston and London were One as well.