Boston Globe Shows Us the Money in Capital

January 22, 2016

The Great Editorial Bake Sale proceeds apace at the Boston Globe.

As the hardreading staff has previously noted, the $tately local broadsheet is the NASCAR of newsprint, with logos peppered on it every which way. Take, for the latest example, today’s edition of Capital, starting Page One upper left.

 

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That’s bookended by the strip across the bottom of the page.

 

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And echoed in this page 3 ad.

 

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Moving on, we have James Pindell’s Ground Game, brought to you by Steward.

 

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Not coincidentally, Steward Health Care System also bought the back page.

 

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Last, and sort of least, the Globe mortgaged its Politics Cafe to Capital One, a natural fit for this particular section..

 

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So to recap: There are now a myriad of ways to use the pages of the Boston Globe to plug your products or services. Nothing especially egregious in most of the above, except allowing Steward to attach itself to editorial content.  That’s a slippery slope the mately local broadsheet really should stay off.

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Boston Herald Joins Globe in Editorial Bake Sale

December 18, 2015

As the hardreading staff has noted in detail, the Boston Globe has of late been leasing out editorial content to paymates of various stripes, from Rockland Trust to Suffolk University to Steward Health Care System.

And now, not surprisingly, the stealthy local tabloid wants in on the auction – in this case via Boston Herald Radio, the streaming audio service that up to dozens of people listen to.

Today’s Herald, page 17:

 

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Upper right:

 

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The frosty (cashword) local tabloid has often run excerpts from BHR interviews alongside its daily promotional ad. But this is the first time the interview is “Sponsored Content” – that is to say, an ad itself.

We get it that newspapers have to come up with creative ways to generate revenue, which is one reason all this sponsored content is suddenly popping up.

We’re just wondering if there’s any bottom to that well.